Climate change in the European Union

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The mitigation of anthropogenic climate change in the European Union is being addressed through a number of measures.

Greenhouse gases[edit]

Hydrofluorocarbons[edit]

Trifluoromethane (HFC-23) is generated and emitted as a byproduct during the production of chlorodifluoromethane (HCFC-22). HCFC-22 is used both in emissive applications (primarily air conditioning and refrigeration) and as a feedstock for production of synthetic polymers. Because HCFC-22 depletes stratospheric ozone, its production for non-feedstock uses is scheduled to be phased out under the Montreal Protocol. However, feedstock production is permitted to continue indefinitely.

In the developed world, HFC-23 emissions decreased between 1990 and 2000 due to process optimization and thermal destruction, although there were increased emissions in the intervening years.

The U.S. and the European Union (EU) drove these trends in the developed world.Although emissions increased in the EU between 1990 and 1995 due to increased production of HCFC-22, a combination of process optimization and thermal oxidation led to a sharp decline in EU emissions after 1995, resulting in a net decrease in emissions of 67 percent for this region between 1990 and 2000.

Methane[edit]

The decline in emissions from 1990 to 1995 in the OECD is largely due to non-climate regulatory programs and the collection and flaring or use of landfill methane. In many OECD countries, landfill methane emissions are not expected to grow, despite continued or even increased waste generation, because of non-climate change related regulations that result in mitigation of air emissions, collection of gas, or closure of facilities. A major driver in the OECD is the European Union Landfill Directive, which limits the amount of organic matter that can enter solid waste facilities. Although organic matter is expected to decrease rapidly in the EU, emissions occur as a result of total waste in place. Emissions will have a gradual decline over time.

Mitigation[edit]

Emissions trading[edit]

Energy[edit]

Sectors[edit]

Further information: Electric vehicle

Eradicating greenhouse gases from power stations and cars, trucks and aviation must be Europe's next policy move to tackle climate change, European Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso has said.[1]

By country[edit]

Germany has target of 40% climate gas reduction by year 2020.[2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://planetark.org/wen/52878
  2. ^ Energiayhtiöt pelkäävät asemansa puolesta HS 6.11.2012 C4 Mr Tapio Laakso Greenpeace (Finland)

External links[edit]