Clive Wilkinson

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Clive Wilkinson (born 1954, Cape Town, South Africa) is an architect and interior designer.[1] Acknowledged as a pioneer in workplace design,[citation needed] Wilkinson is best known for designing the Googleplex, the headquarters of Google in Silicon Valley.[2] He has also designed several top global advertising agencies, including JWT in New York City,[3] and Mother Advertising in London.[4] Wilkinson's introduction of urban planning concepts to organize and animate large office projects began with the design of TBWA\Chiat\Day's Los Angeles headquarters in 1998.

Education and early career[edit]

Completing his first architectural degree at the University of Cape Town in South Africa, Wilkinson finished his professional schooling in 1980 at the Architectural Association School of Architecture (AA) in London, studying under Rem Koolhaas and Zaha Hadid. He went on to work for Arup and then Terry Farrell, where he became a Design Director and collaborated on such urban renewal projects as TVAM Studios and Alban Gate.[citation needed]

In 1990, after working in Sydney, Australia for six months, Wilkinson relocated from London to Los Angeles to work for Frank Gehry as a Project Manager on the Disney Concert Hall and Chiat/Day’s Venice, Los Angeles offices. By 1991, Wilkinson had established his own firm in Los Angeles. His first project to win international acclaim was the headquarters for the world-renowned advertising agency TBWA\Chiat\Day. Wilkinson transformed an empty warehouse in Los Angeles into an Advertising City where open offices co-exist with a basketball court and Main Street. The outwardly plain-looking structure was made visually dynamic by an addition of a yellow gatehouse entrance with tubular bridge structures.[5]

Clive Wilkinson Architects[edit]

With a practice in Los Angeles, California, Clive Wilkinson's eponymous firm, Clive Wilkinson Architects (CWa), completed a 330,000 Square Foot office in Sydney, Australia for Macquarie Group, One Shelley Street,[6] the recipient of multiple architectural awards. After being named a Finalist in both 2010 and 2011, Clive Wilkinson Architects was awarded the 2012 Cooper–Hewitt, National Design Museum's National Design Award for "Excellence in Interior Design".[7]

Current projects include the design of new offices for radio station and NPR affiliate, KCRW[8] in Santa Monica, including a new facility for Santa Monica College's Academy of Entertainment Technology campus[9] and designing new buildings for the UCLA School of Theater, Film and Television.

Accolades[edit]

In 2005, Wilkinson was inducted into Interior Design Magazine's Hall of Fame,[10][11] and selected as a "Master of Design" by Fast Company (magazine)[12] in 2006. In 2008 The New York Times featured an article about Wilkinson and the Norwich Drive Residence, a home he built for himself in West Hollywood.[13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Clive Wilkinson Architects". Haworth, Inc. 2011. Retrieved 2011-09-27. 
  2. ^ Jade Chang (2006-06-19). "Behind the Glass Curtain". Metropolis Magazine. Retrieved 2011-09-27. 
  3. ^ Deborah Wilk (2008-12-01). "Clive Wilkinson Architects JWT, NEW YORK". Interior Design Magazine. Retrieved 2011-09-27. 
  4. ^ Edie Cohen (2005-06-01). "Big Mama". Interior Design Magazine. Retrieved 2011-09-28. 
  5. ^ TBWA\Chiat\Day Los Angeles, YouTube Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Vzp3O8wYF8
  6. ^ Katie Gerfen (2010-07-08). "One Shelley Street Sydney/Clive Wilkinson Architects". Architect Magazine. Retrieved 2011-09-28. 
  7. ^ National Design Award
  8. ^ Sam Lubell (2008-08-08). "Making Radio Waves". The Architect's Newspaper. Retrieved 2011-09-26. 
  9. ^ "Closer Look at Clive Wilkinson's Plans for KCRW and Santa Monica College*". Curbed Los Angeles. Retrieved 2011-09-27. 
  10. ^ "National Design Awards". Smithsonian, Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum. Retrieved 2011-09-29. 
  11. ^ "Clive Wilkinson". Interior Design. 2010-11-23. Retrieved 2011-09-26. 
  12. ^ Aric Chen (2006-10-01). "The Builder". Fast Company. Retrieved 2011-09-26. 
  13. ^ Barbara Graustark (2008-8-). "Clubhouse Living". The New York Times. Retrieved 2011-09-28. 

External links[edit]