Closter, New Jersey

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"Closter" redirects here. For the community in Nebraska, see Closter, Nebraska.
Closter, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Closter
The former station depot of the Erie Railroad's Northern Branch as seen from the crossing of County Route 502 (High Street) in Closter.
The former station depot of the Erie Railroad's Northern Branch as seen from the crossing of County Route 502 (High Street) in Closter.
Nickname(s): "Hub of the Northern Valley"
Map highlighting Closter's location within Bergen County. Inset: Bergen County's location within New Jersey
Map highlighting Closter's location within Bergen County. Inset: Bergen County's location within New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Closter, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Closter, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°58′22″N 73°57′37″W / 40.97289°N 73.960315°W / 40.97289; -73.960315Coordinates: 40°58′22″N 73°57′37″W / 40.97289°N 73.960315°W / 40.97289; -73.960315[1][2]
Country  United States of America
State  New Jersey
County Bergen
Incorporated January 1, 1904
Government[6]
 • Type Borough
 • Mayor Sophie Heymann (R, term ends December 31, 2014)[3]
 • Administrator Richard Sheola[4]
 • Clerk Loretta Castano[5]
Area[2]
 • Total 3.295 sq mi (8.535 km2)
 • Land 3.164 sq mi (8.196 km2)
 • Water 0.131 sq mi (0.339 km2)  3.98%
Area rank 323rd of 566 in state
24th of 70 in county[2]
Elevation[7] 39 ft (12 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10]
 • Total 8,373
 • Estimate (2013)[11] 8,545
 • Rank 273rd of 566 in state
45th of 70 in county[12]
 • Density 2,646.0/sq mi (1,021.6/km2)
 • Density rank 235th of 566 in state
45th of 70 in county[12]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07624[13][14]
Area code(s) 201 exchanges: 750, 767, 768, 784[15]
FIPS code 3400313810[16][2][17]
GNIS feature ID 0885190[18][2]
Website www.closterboro.com

Closter (pronounced [ˈkloːsta] or [ˈkloːstə], with a long o[19]) is a borough in Bergen County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 8,373,[8][9] reflecting a decline of 10 (-0.1%) from the 8,383 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 289 (+3.6%) from the 8,094 counted in the 1990 Census.[20]

Closter, first settled in 1710, was formed by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on January 1, 1904, from portions of Harrington Township. On March 29, 1904, Harrington Park was created from portions of Closter, Harrington Township and Washington Township.[21][22] After the turn of the 20th century, Closter changed from being sprawling estates and farms into an upper middle class suburban town.[23]

Geography[edit]

Closter is located at 40°58′22″N 73°57′37″W / 40.97289°N 73.960315°W / 40.97289; -73.960315 (40.97289,-73.960315). According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 3.295 square miles (8.535 km2), of which, 3.164 square miles (8.196 km2) of it was land and 0.131 square miles (0.339 km2) of it (3.98%) was water.[1][2]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1900 1,057
1910 1,483 40.3%
1920 1,840 24.1%
1930 2,502 36.0%
1940 2,603 4.0%
1950 3,376 29.7%
1960 7,767 130.1%
1970 8,604 10.8%
1980 8,164 −5.1%
1990 8,094 −0.9%
2000 8,383 3.6%
2010 8,373 −0.1%
Est. 2013 8,545 [11] 2.1%
Population sources:
1910-1920[24] 1910[25]
1910-1930[26] 1900-2010[27][28][29]
2000[30][31] 2010[8][9][10]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 8,373 people, 2,747 households, and 2,327 families residing in the borough. The population density was 2,646.0 per square mile (1,021.6 /km2). There were 2,860 housing units at an average density of 903.8 per square mile (349.0 /km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 64.17% (5,373) White, 1.31% (110) Black or African American, 0.05% (4) Native American, 31.65% (2,650) Asian, 0.01% (1) Pacific Islander, 1.54% (129) from other races, and 1.27% (106) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 5.98% (501) of the population.[8]

There were 2,747 households, of which 43.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 73.2% were married couples living together, 8.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 15.3% were non-families. 12.9% of all households were made up of individuals, and 7.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.02 and the average family size was 3.30.[8]

In the borough, 26.7% of the population were under the age of 18, 6.3% from 18 to 24, 20.5% from 25 to 44, 33.0% from 45 to 64, and 13.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43.2 years. For every 100 females there were 96.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.4 males.[8]

Korean Americans accounted for 21.2% of the population.[8]

Same-sex couples headed 15 households in 2010, an increase from the 10 counted in 2000.[32]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $117,147 (with a margin of error of +/- $14,096) and the median family income was $128,656 (+/- $13,704). Males had a median income of $93,578 (+/- $13,709) versus $64,167 (+/- $13,864) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $50,501 (+/- $4,636). About 3.2% of families and 3.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.2% of those under age 18 and 3.4% of those age 65 or over.[33]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[16] there were 8,383 people, 2,789 households, and 2,320 families residing in the borough. The population density was 2,644.3 people per square mile (1,021.0/km2). There were 2,865 housing units at an average density of 903.7 per square mile (349.0/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 75.32% White, 0.93% African American, 0.10% Native American, 21.56% Asian, 0.81% from other races, and 1.29% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.09% of the population.[30][31]

As of the 2000 Census, 12.75% of Closter's residents identified themselves as being of Korean ancestry, which was the seventh highest in the United States and fifth highest of any municipality in New Jersey, for all places with 1,000 or more residents identifying their ancestry.[34] As of the 2010 Census, 21.2% residents (1,771 people) indicated that they were of Korean ancestry.[8]

There were 2,789 households out of which 43.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 72.9% were married couples living together, 8.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 16.8% were non-families. 14.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.98 and the average family size was 3.30.[30][31]

In the borough the population was spread out with 28.0% under the age of 18, 4.8% from 18 to 24, 28.1% from 25 to 44, 26.0% from 45 to 64, and 13.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 97.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.0 males.[30][31]

The median income for a household in the borough was $83,918, and the median income for a family was $94,543. Males had a median income of $65,848 versus $39,125 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $37,065. About 1.7% of families and 2.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.0% of those under age 18 and 1.8% of those age 65 or over.[30][31]

History[edit]

The Lenni Lenape Native Americans tilled the soil, hunted in the woods, and fished in the rivers and streams before the Dutch arrived in the early 18th Century. The Dutch settlers, though, left an indelible mark on the area. Early records show that after the English takeover of New Netherland, English Governor Philip Carteret in 1669 granted a real estate speculator named Balthaser De Hart a strip of property which extended east and west from the Hudson River to the Tiena Kill, and north and south from today’s Cresskill into Palisades, New York.[35] It is within these geographical boundaries that lies what is now known as Closter. The northern half of this tract of land consisting of 1,030 acres (420 ha) (extending from what is Closter Dock Road northward) was purchased by Barent and Resolvert Nagel on April 25, 1710,[36] who along with the Vervalen family first settled what is now Closter.

The name Closter is of Dutch origin and it first appears in 1745, when Arie Arieaense purchases “A certain tract of land lying on Tappan in Orange County and in the province of New York at a certain place called Klooster”[37] (At that time, Closter, New Jersey was considered part of New York State.). Klooster, means “a quiet place, a monastery or cloister.”[38] This location in 1710 when the Nagel brothers first settled it was a quiet place, with very few people in the immediate area. The topography gave a sense of isolation and protection, tucked behind the highest point of the Palisades and protected by limited access. The original settlers must have felt “cloistered,” as if in a monastery. The name was originally pronounced with a “ow” sound, phonetically, “Klowster.”

Later, just before the American Revolution, these isolated settlers began to feel the imposing hand of the British Crown in their lives – not only in governmental affairs but also by the influx of English culture upon their own language and culture. And as a result the “K” in Klooster was dropped and was replaced with a “C” so the now growing village became known as Clooster.

By 1795, with the emerging new American culture, the second “o” in Clooster was dropped, and the American English “long o” sound was adopted which led to today’s pronunciation of Closter.[19]

Reminders of Closter's early Dutch history abound - with local streets named after some of the early families (Bogert, Demarest, Durie, Naugle, Parsells, Vervalen, Auryansen, Haring, and Westervelt), and a rich collection of unique Jersey Dutch houses.[39]

The arrival of the Northern Branch in 1859,[40] followed by additional train service from what became the West Shore Railroad, brought residents to the community who could commute to Manhattan via the ferry across the Hudson River at the railroad's Weehawken depot.[23] Closter's central location earned it the nickname "Hub of the Northern Valley".[41]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Closter is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The governing body consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[6]

As of 2013, the Mayor of Closter Borough is Republican Sophie Heymann, whose term of office ends December 31, 2014. Members of the Closter Borough Council are Council President John C. Glidden, Jr. (R, 2013), Victoria R. Amitai (R, 2013), David Barad (R, 2014), Arthur B. Dolson (R, 2015), John W. Kashwick, Jr. (R, 2014) and Alissa J. Latner (R, 2015).[42][43][44][45][46][47][48]

In the 2011 general election, incumbent Councilmembers John Kashwick and David Barad were re-elected to three-year terms of office after running unopposed.[49]

In the 2010 general election, incumbent Mayor Sophie Heymann (1386 votes) was re-elected to a new, four-year term over former Councilwoman Linda Albelli (913 votes) while Councilman John C. Glidden, Jr. (1402 votes) and Councilwoman Victoria R. Amitai (1401 votes) were elected to new, three-years terms over former Councilman Michael "Jack" Kelly.[50]

In the 2009 election incumbents Tom Hennessey and Cynthia Tutoli dropped out of the race in September and were replaced by former Councilman Arthur Dolson and newcomer Alissa Latner. On November 3, Dolson (1,183 votes) and Latner (1,119) defeated former Councilwoman Linda Albelli (1,093 votes) and former Councilman Michael "Jack" Kelly (1,032).[51]

In the 2008 General Election, Republican incumbents David H. Barad (1,616 votes) and John Kashwick (1,590) won re-election to new, three-year terms in office, fending off Democratic challengers Leonard J. Asch (1,541) and running mate Michael "Jack" Kelly (1,453).[52]

Emergency services[edit]

Closter has its own fire department that formed in 1893. The department responds to an average of 275 calls a year.[53]

The Closter Volunteer Ambulance and Rescue Corps was formed in 1936, and serves Closter and the neighboring borough of Alpine.[54]

Closter also has its own police department.[55] Led by Chief Dennis Kaine, the department includes a lieutenant, five sergeants, two detectives and ten patrol officers.[56]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Closter is located in the 5th Congressional District[57] and is part of New Jersey's 39th state legislative district.[9][58][59]

New Jersey's Fifth Congressional District is represented by Scott Garrett (R, Wantage Township).[60] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[61][62] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[63][64]

The 39th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Gerald Cardinale (R, Demarest) and in the General Assembly by Holly Schepisi (R, River Vale) and Bob Schroeder (R, Washington Township, Bergen County).[65] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[66] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[67]

Bergen County is governed by a directly elected County Executive, with legislative functions performed by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders.[68] The County Executive is Kathleen Donovan (R, Rutherford; term ends December 31, 2014).[69] The seven freeholders are elected at-large in partisan elections on a staggered basis, with two or three seats coming up for election each year, with a Chairman, Vice Chairman and Chairman Pro Tempore selected from among its members at a reorganization meeting held each January.[70] As of 2014, Bergen County's Freeholders are Freeholder Chairman David L. Ganz (D, 2014; Fair Lawn),[71] Vice Chairwoman Joan Voss (D, 2014; Fort Lee),[72] Chairman Pro Tempore John A. Felice (R, 2016; River Edge),[73] Maura R. DeNicola (R, 2016; Franklin Lakes),[74] Steve Tanelli (D, 2015; North Arlington)[75] James J. Tedesco, III (D, 2015; Paramus)[76] and Tracy Silna Zur (D, 2015; Franklin Lakes).[77][78] Countywide constitutional officials are County Clerk John S. Hogan (D, Northvale),[79] Sheriff Michael Saudino (R),[80] Surrogate Michael R. Dressler (D, Cresskill)[81][82][68]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 4,930 registered voters in Closter, of which 1,348 (27.3% vs. 31.7% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 1,060 (21.5% vs. 21.1%) were registered as Republicans and 2,519 (51.1% vs. 47.1%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 3 voters registered to other parties.[83] Among the borough's 2010 Census population, 58.9% (vs. 57.1% in Bergen County) were registered to vote, including 80.4% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 73.7% countywide).[83][84]

In the 2012 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 1,857 votes here (52.3% vs. 54.8% countywide), ahead of Republican Mitt Romney with 1,639 votes (46.2% vs. 43.5%) and other candidates with 30 votes (0.8% vs. 0.9%), among the 3,550 ballots cast by the borough's 5,136 registered voters, for a turnout of 69.1% (vs. 70.4% in Bergen County).[85][86] In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 2,184 votes here (55.2% vs. 53.9% countywide), ahead of Republican John McCain with 1,715 votes (43.4% vs. 44.5%) and other candidates with 28 votes (0.7% vs. 0.8%), among the 3,955 ballots cast by the borough's 5,187 registered voters, for a turnout of 76.2% (vs. 76.8% in Bergen County).[87][88] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 2,100 votes here (52.6% vs. 51.7% countywide), ahead of Republican George W. Bush with 1,860 votes (46.5% vs. 47.2%) and other candidates with 27 votes (0.7% vs. 0.7%), among the 3,996 ballots cast by the borough's 5,086 registered voters, for a turnout of 78.6% (vs. 76.9% in the whole county).[89]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Democrat Jon Corzine received 1,238 ballots cast (48.7% vs. 48.0% countywide), ahead of Republican Chris Christie with 1,156 votes (45.5% vs. 45.8%), Independent Chris Daggett with 112 votes (4.4% vs. 4.7%) and other candidates with 7 votes (0.3% vs. 0.5%), among the 2,543 ballots cast by the borough's 5,064 registered voters, yielding a 50.2% turnout (vs. 50.0% in the county).[90]

Education[edit]

The Closter Public Schools serve students in Kindergarten through eighth grade. Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[91]) are Hillside Elementary School[92] (with 558 students in grades K-4) and Tenakill Middle School[93] (with 551 students in grades 5-8).[94]

Public school students in ninth through twelfth grades attend Northern Valley Regional High School at Demarest in Demarest, together with students from Demarest and Haworth.[95] The high school is part of the Northern Valley Regional High School District, which also serves students from Harrington Park, Northvale, Norwood, Old Tappan and Rockleigh. Local students had attended Closter High School until Northern Valley Regional High School at Demarest opened in 1955, whereupon the Closter school was closed.[41]

Public school students from the borough, and all of Bergen County, are eligible to attend the secondary education programs offered by the Bergen County Technical Schools, which include the Bergen County Academies in Hackensack, and the Bergen Tech campus in Teterboro or Paramus. The district offers programs on a shared-time or full-time basis, with admission based on a selective application process and tuition covered by the student's home school district.[96][97]

Transportation[edit]

The borough had a total of 43.34 miles (69.75 km) of roadways, of which 33.48 miles (53.88 km) are maintained by the municipality and 9.86 miles (15.87 km) by Bergen County.[98]

County Route 501, County Route 502 and County Route 505 travel through Closter.

The New Jersey Transit 167 and 177 bus routes provide service along Schraalenburgh Road to the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan.[99] Coach USA's Red and Tan Lines also provides service from Closter to the Port Authority Bus Terminal via the 20 and 14E bus routes, with limited service to the George Washington Bridge Bus Station offered on the 84 route.[100]

Shopping and entertainment[edit]

Closter has an outdoor mall called Closter Plaza. It has stores (including a Kmart), restaurants, and a movie theater.

The Closter Golf Center includes a two-story driving range and a mini golf course.

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Closter include:

Sources[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 14, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 12, 2013.
  4. ^ Directory, Borough of Closter. Accessed July 13, 2012.
  5. ^ Borough Clerk, Borough of Closter. Accessed July 13, 2012.
  6. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 165.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Closter, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 5, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Closter borough, Bergen County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 15, 2011.
  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 15. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  10. ^ a b Table DP-1. Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Closter borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed May 17, 2012.
  11. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 - 2013 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2014.
  12. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 11, 2012.
  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Closter, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed September 12, 2011.
  14. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed October 8, 2013.
  15. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Closter, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed October 8, 2013.
  16. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  17. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed May 17, 2012.
  18. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  19. ^ a b Westergaard, Barbara. "Closter: Bergen", New Jersey: A Guide to the State, p. 78. Rutgers University Press, 2006. ISBN 0-8135-3685-5. Accessed July 22, 2011. "Known locally as the "hub of the Northern Valley," Closter (pronounced with a long o) was an early settlement - the first individual purchases in the records date to 1701 - and many of its Dutch houses remain (try Hickory La. and Piermont Rd.)"
  20. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed June 25, 2012.
  21. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 76. Accessed May 17, 2012.
  22. ^ "History of Bergen County" p. 343 has the date as April 13, 1903 for the formation of Closter.
  23. ^ a b DePalma, Anthony. "Closter", The New York Times, February 27, 1983. Accessed July 22, 2011.
  24. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed October 8, 2013.
  25. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 335. Accessed May 17, 2012. Population is not listed for 1900.
  26. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 714. Accessed December 15, 2011.
  27. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network. Accessed May 17, 2012.
  28. ^ Bergen County Data Book 2003, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 26, 2013. Data for 1900, prior to the formation of the borough, was extrapolated by the County based on census data.
  29. ^ Historical Population Trends in Bergen County (1900-2010), Bergen County Department of Planning & Economic Development, 2011. Accessed December 4, 2013. Data for years prior to the borough's formation were extrapolated by county analysts.
  30. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Closter borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 5, 2013.
  31. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Closter borough, Bergen County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 5, 2013.
  32. ^ Lipman, Harvy; and Sheingold, Dave. "North Jersey sees 30% growth in same-sex couples", The Record (Bergen County), August 14, 2011. Accessed July 26, 2013.
  33. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Closter borough, Bergen County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 17, 2012.
  34. ^ Korean Communities, EPodunk. Accessed March 2, 2011.
  35. ^ Budke, George H., Abstracts of early deeds, patents, mortgages and other instruments affecting the land titles of Rockland County, NY. (New City, New York : Library Association of Rockland County, 1975), pp. 165-167.
  36. ^ April 25, 1710 Deed between Lancaster Symes and Barent and Resolvert Nagel (Early Orange County Deeds, Orange County Court House, Goshen, New York), p. 68
  37. ^ August 7, 1745 Deed between Coenradus Rouger of Tappan in Orange County, Province of New York (grantor) & Arie Arieaense of the same place (grantee), original document in the Auryansen Family Document Collection
  38. ^ http://www.interglot.com/dictionary/nl/en/translate/klooster
  39. ^ Historic Sites, Borough of Closter. Accessed June 3, 2014.
  40. ^ of the Northern Rail Road of New Jersey, Library of Congress. Accessed June 3, 2014.
  41. ^ a b History, Borough of Closter. Accessed July 22, 2011.
  42. ^ Mayor & Council, Borough of Closter. Accessed December 4, 2013.
  43. ^ 2013 Municipal Data Sheet, Borough of Closter. Accessed December 4, 2013.
  44. ^ Reorganization Meeting Minutes, January 2, 2013, Borough of Closter. Accessed July 26, 2013. "1: ALISSA J. LATNER – Municipal Court Judge Thomas Betancourt administered the Oath of Office to Councilwoman Alissa J. Latner. 2: ARTHUR BRAUN DOLSON – Municipal Court Judge Thomas Betancourt administered the Oath of Office to Councilman Arthur Braun Dolson.... Council President John Glidden"
  45. ^ Bergen County Directory 2012-2013, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed December 4, 2013.
  46. ^ Bergen County Statement of Vote General Election 2012, Bergen County Clerk, November 6, 2012. Accessed December 4, 2013.
  47. ^ Bergen County Statement of Vote General Election 2011, Bergen County Clerk, November 17, 2011. Accessed December 4, 2013.
  48. ^ Bergen County Statement of Vote General Election 2010, Bergen County Clerk, November 10, 2010. Accessed December 4, 2013.
  49. ^ Baskind, Amanda. "Kashwick and Barad retain seats in unopposed Closter election", Northern Valley Suburbanite, November 8, 2011. Accessed December 11, 2011. "Republican Incumbents John Kashwick and David Barad, were elected to serve on the council for another three years in an uncontested race."
  50. ^ Baskind, Amanda. "Heymann elected to second term in Closter", The Record (Bergen County), November 3, 2010. Accessed March 2, 2011.
  51. ^ Sudol, Karen. Election 2009: Closter, The Record (Bergen County), November 3, 2009. Accessed March 2, 2011.
  52. ^ Staff. "County, town races across Bergen County", The Record (Bergen County), November 5, 2008. Accessed November 6, 2008.
  53. ^ Fire Department, Borough of Closter. Accessed December 19, 2013.
  54. ^ Ambulance Corps, Borough of Closter. Accessed December 19, 2013.
  55. ^ Police Department, Borough of Closter. Accessed December 19, 2013.
  56. ^ Police Department Personnel Roster, Borough of Closter. Accessed December 19, 2013.
  57. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  58. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 56, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  59. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  60. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  61. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  62. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  63. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  64. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  65. ^ Legislative Roster 2012-2013 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 11, 2012.
  66. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  67. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  68. ^ a b 2014 County and Municipal Directory, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 15, 2014.
  69. ^ County Executive, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 15, 2014
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