CloudFlare

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CloudFlare
Cloudflare-logo-horizontal.png
Founded July 2009 (2009-07)
Headquarters San Francisco, California, U.S.
Founder(s) Matthew Prince
Lee Holloway
Michelle Zatlyn
Key people Matthew Prince (CEO)
Lee Holloway
Michelle Zatlyn
Industry Internet
Products CloudFlare
Services Website performance,
security-as-a-service
Website www.cloudflare.com
Alexa rank Increase 3,189 (July 2012)

CloudFlare is a content delivery network and distributed domain name server service marketed as improving website performance and speed and providing security.

History[edit]

Matthew Prince, Lee Holloway, and Michelle Zatlyn created CloudFlare in 2009.[1][2] They previously worked on Project Honey Pot.[1][3] CloudFlare was launched at the September 2010 TechCrunch Disrupt conference.[1][2]

CloudFlare received media attention in June 2011, not all of it positive, after providing security to LulzSec's website.[2][4]

In July 2011, CloudFlare announced receiving $20 million in venture funding from New Enterprise Associates, Venrock, and Pelion Venture Partners, after receiving $2 million in earlier funding.[5] It had raised the additional funding in November 2010.[6]

In October 2011, CloudFlare was named as the Most Innovative Network & Internet Technology Company of 2011 by Wall Street Journal.[7] The World Economic Forum (WEF) noted CloudFlare's "innovative algorithms" and ability to adapt in its "Technology Pioneers 2012" report.[8][9] The WEF called LulzSec's use of CloudFlare's services "a vote of confidence in CloudFlare's approach."[8][9]

In June 2012, the hacker group UGNazi attacked CloudFlare partially via flaws in Google's authentication systems, gaining administrative access to CloudFlare and using it to deface 4chan.[10][11]

Products[edit]

CloudFlare has both free and paid services. Its customers have included the Turkish government,[2] Stratfor, and Metallica,[12] with many customers outside the United States.[13]

CloudFlare uses a modified version of Nginx as a key technology.[14] As of April 2013, it had 23 data centers.[15]

CloudFlare offers four types of service plans: Free, Pro, Business and Enterprise.

Product reviews[edit]

While CloudFlare's main business is protecting customers from DoS attacks, they also provide other services like a web application firewall (WAF). A report by Zero Science Lab from 2013 comparing web application firewalls found that CloudFlare's WAF is less effective than ModSecurity and Incapsula.[16]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Our story". CloudFlare. Retrieved 2011-08-15. 
  2. ^ a b c d Henderson, Nicole (2011-06-17). "CloudFlare Gets an Unusual Endorsement from Hacker Group LulzSec". Webhost Industry Review. Retrieved 2011-08-15. 
  3. ^ "CloudFlare Beta". Project Honey Pot. Retrieved 2011-08-15. 
  4. ^ Hesseldahl, Arik (2011-06-10). "Web Security Start-Up Cloudflare Gets Buzz, Courtesy of LulzSec Hackers". All Things Digital. Retrieved 2011-08-15. 
  5. ^ Hesseldahl, Arik (2011-07-12). "Web Security Start-Up CloudFlare Lands $20 Million Funding Round". AllThingsD. Retrieved 2012-07-12. 
  6. ^ Milian, Mark (December 18, 2012). "Why a Fast-Growing Startup Tries to Keep Its Venture Funding Secret". Tech Deals. Bloomberg. Retrieved January 1, 2013. 
  7. ^ "CloudFlare Named Most Innovative Network & Internet Technology Company". CDN-Advisor.com. 2011-10-20. Retrieved 2012-11-13. 
  8. ^ a b "Technology Pioneers 2012". World Economic Forum. September 2011. p. 8. Retrieved 2011-09-06. 
  9. ^ a b Anderson, Nate (2011-09-01). "CloudFlare named "tech pioneer" after protecting LulzSec website". Ars Technica. Retrieved 2011-09-08. 
  10. ^ Simcoe, Luke (2012-06-14). "The 4chan breach: How hackers got a password through voicemail". Maclean's. Retrieved 2012-07-12. 
  11. ^ Ms. Smith (2012-06-03). "Hacktivists UGNazi attack 4chan, CloudFlare and Wounded Warrior Project". Privacy and Security Fanatic. NetworkWorld. Retrieved 2012-07-12. 
  12. ^ Perlroth, Nicole (February 17, 2012). "Preparing for DDoS Attacks or Just Groundhog Day". Bits. New York Times. Retrieved January 1, 2013. 
  13. ^ Denne, Scott (December 26, 2012). "Selling Abroad From the Get-Go". Wall Street Journal. Retrieved January 1, 2013. 
  14. ^ Lardinois, Frederic (June 15, 2012). "Making The Web Faster: CloudFlare Adds Support For Google’s SPDY Protocol". TechCrunch. Retrieved January 1, 2013. 
  15. ^ Matthew, Prince (March 3, 2013). "Today's Outage Post Mortem". CloudFlare. Retrieved March 3, 2013. 
  16. ^ Perez, Tony (9 March 2013). "Protect Your Website Vulnerabilities With a WAF – New Compairson Report – CloudFlare vs Incapsula vs ModSecurity". Tony on Security. Retrieved 14 April 2013. 

External links[edit]