Club Brugge K.V.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Club Brugge)
Jump to: navigation, search
Club Brugge
Logo
Full name Club Brugge Koninklijke Voetbalvereniging (Club Bruges Royal Football association)
Nickname(s) Blauw-Zwart (Blue-Black), Club, FCB
Founded

13 November 1891; 122 years ago (1891-11-13)

Stamnummer (matricule number) 3
Ground Jan Breydelstadion (Jan Breydel Stadium),
Bruges
Ground Capacity 29,472[1]
President Bart Verhaeghe
Head coach Michel Preud'homme
League Belgian Pro League
2012–13 Belgian Pro League, 3rd
Website Club home page
Home colours
Away colours
Third colours
Tifo before the Champions League game Club Brugge-Rapid Wien in 2005

Club Brugge Koninklijke Voetbalvereniging (Flemish pronunciation: [klʏp ˈbrʏʝə ˈkoːnɪŋkləkə ˈvudbɑɫvəˈreːnəʝɪŋ]), also referred to as just Club Brugge is a football club from Bruges in Belgium. It was founded in 1891 and is one of the top clubs in Belgium. Its home ground is the Jan Breydel Stadium, which has a capacity of 29,472.

Club Brugge's major rival is R.S.C. Anderlecht, and it shares the Jan Breydel Stadium with city rival Cercle Brugge K.S.V., with whom they contest the Bruges derby.

Throughout its long history, Club Brugge has enjoyed much European football success, reaching two European finals and two European semi-finals. Club Brugge is the only Belgian club to have played the final of the European Cup (forerunner of the current UEFA Champions League) so far. They were beaten by Liverpool F.C. in the final of its 1978 season. They also lost in the 1976 UEFA Cup Final to Liverpool. Club Brugge holds the record number of consecutive participations in the UEFA Cup (16).

History[edit]

  • 1890: Brugsche Football Club

Club created by old students of the Catholic school Broeders Xaverianen and the neutral school Koninklijk Atheneum.

  • 13 November 1891: Club recreated

The club was recreated. This has since been adopted as the official date of foundation.

  • 1892: First board

An official board was installed in the club.

  • 1894: Football Club Brugeois

Club created by 16 old members of Brugsche FC.

  • 1895: Vlaamsche Football Club de Bruges

Club created in the city.

  • 1895/1896: the UBSSA set up in 1895. and they went to the UBSSA and took part of the first Belgian national league.
  • 1896: Leaving the UBSSA

Financially it was difficult for FC Brugeois and so after only one year they had to leave the UBSSA.

  • 1897: Fusion

FC Brugeois joined Brugsche FC but they continued under the name Football Club Brugeois.

  • 1902: New fusion

Vlaamsche FC joined FC Brugeois.

  • 1912: De Klokke

They moved to a new stadium named "De Klokke".

  • 1913/1914: First cup final

FC Brugeois reached their first Belgian Cup final but they lost 2–1 from Union SG.

  • 1920: First time league champions

The club became for the first time champions of the first division.

  • 1926: Royal Football Club Brugeois

The club get number 3 as their matricule number and in the same year they get the royal title.

  • 1928: First relegation

A first low when the club was relegated to the second division.

  • 1930: New statute

President Albert Dyserynck changed the club's statute into a non-profit association.

  • 1931: Albert Dyserynckstadion

When president Albert Dyserynck suddenly died they honoured him by changing the stadium's name into Albert Dyserynckstadion.

  • 1959: Permanent to the first division

RFC Brugeois promoted to the first division and never relegated again in the future.

  • 1968: First time cup winners

They won the Belgian Cup for the first time against Beerschot AC (1–1, 7–6 after penalty's).

  • 1972: Club Brugge Koninklijke Voetbalvereniging

The club changed their name into the Flemisch name Club Brugge KV

They moved from Albert Dyserynckstadion to Olympiastadion (current Jan Breydelstadion).

Under Austrian coach Ernst Happel, Club Brugge reached the finals of the UEFA Cup and lost against Liverpool (3–2 and 1–1).

Still under Ernst Happel, the club faced Liverpool again of a European final. This time it was in the European Champions Clubs' Cup final. And again they lost (1–0). Club Brugge is the only Belgian club that have reached the finals of the European biggest competition.

Daniel Amokachi is the first goal scorer in the Champions League. He scored against CSKA Moskva.

Olympiastadion had to be expanded for the EURO 2000 organisation. They also changed the name into Jan Breydelstadion.

  • 2006: CLUBtv

Club Brugge was the first Belgian club to create its own TV channel.

Honours[edit]

Domestic[edit]

1919–20, 1972–73, 1975–76, 1976–77, 1977–78, 1979–80, 1987–88, 1989–90, 1991–92, 1995–96, 1997–98, 2002–03, 2004–05
1898-99, 1899-00, 1905-06, 1909-10, 1910-11, 1966-67, 1967-68, 1969-70, 1970-71, 1971-72, 1984-85, 1985-86, 1993-94, 1996-97, 1998-99, 1999-00, 2000-01, 2001-02, 2003-04, 2011-12
1967–68, 1969–70, 1976–77, 1985–86, 1990–91, 1994–95, 1995–96, 2001–02, 2003–04, 2006–07
1913–14, 1978–79, 1982–83, 1993-94, 1997-98, 2004–05
1980, 1986, 1988, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1994, 1996, 1998, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005
1995, 2007

International[edit]

1977–78
1976–77
1975–76
1987–88
1991–92
1970–71, 1994–95
1979, 1981, 1984, 1990, 1992, 1993, 1995, 1996, 1998, 2000, 2001, 2004, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2011, 2012, 2013
1981

European record[edit]

As of 19 August 2011.
Competition A GP W D L GF GA
European Cup / UEFA Champions League 14 77 32 16 29 106 93
UEFA Cup Winners' Cup 6 28 15 3 10 41 33
UEFA Cup / UEFA Europa League 24 126 59 26 41 226 166

A = appearances, GP = games played, W = won, D = drawn, L = lost, GF = goals for, GA = goals against.

Matches[edit]

  • Q = qualification round
  • PO = play-off
  • R = round
  • Group = group stage / Group 1 = first group stage / Group 2 = second group stage
  • 1/8 = eighth finals / 1/4 = quarter-finals / 1/2 = semi-finals
  • F = final
  • PUC = points UEFA coefficient

Total points for UEFA coefficient: 270.0.

Summary of best results[edit]

From the quarter-finals upwards:

(2 finals)

European Cup/UEFA Champions League (1):

- finalists in 1978
- quarter-finalists in 1977

UEFA Cup Winners' Cup:

- semi-finalists in 1992
- quarter-finalists in 1971 and 1995

UEFA Cup/UEFA Europa League (1):

- finalists in 1976
- semi-finalists in 1988

UEFA ranking[edit]

Current ranking[edit]

As of 25 July 2013[2]
Rank Team Coefficient
60 Romania Steaua București 33.026
61 Scotland Celtic 31.838
62 Germany Hamburg 31.728
63 Belgium Club Brugge 31.220
64 Israel Hapoel Tel Aviv 30.500
65 Czech Republic Viktoria Plzeň 29.945
66 Germany VfL Wolfsburg 29.728

Players[edit]

First team squad[edit]

As of 23 February 2014

Note: Flags indicate national team as has been defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Position Player
2 Norway DF Tom Høgli
3 Belgium MF Timmy Simons (captain)
4 Costa Rica DF Óscar Duarte
6 Ghana MF Enoch Adu
7 Burundi FW Mohammed Tchité
8 Israel FW Lior Refaelov
9 Belgium FW Tom De Sutter
10 Denmark MF Jesper Jørgensen
11 Belgium MF Jonathan Blondel
13 Spain MF Víctor Vázquez
14 Denmark DF Jim Larsen
15 China MF Shangyuan Wang
16 Belgium FW Maxime Lestienne
17 Poland MF Waldemar Sobota
19 Belgium DF Thomas Meunier
21 Australia GK Mathew Ryan
No. Position Player
22 Iceland FW Eiður Guðjohnsen
27 Portugal DF Elton Monteiro
28 Belgium DF Laurens De Bock
30 Chile FW Nicolás Castillo
32 Belgium MF Vadis Odjidja-Ofoe
33 Serbia GK Vladan Kujović
40 Belgium DF Björn Engels
41 Belgium MF Birger Verstraete
42 Belgium FW Nikola Storm
43 Belgium MF Sander Coopman
44 Belgium DF Brandon Mechele
50 Belgium GK Sven Dhoest
55 Belgium FW Tuur Dierckx
63 Belgium FW Boli Bolingoli-Mbombo
77 Sweden DF Fredrik Stenman
90 Nigeria FW Kehinde Fatai (on loan from Astra Giurgiu)

For recent transfers, see the list of Belgian football transfers summer 2013.

Out on loan[edit]

Note: Flags indicate national team as has been defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Position Player
20 Greece MF Spyros Fourlanos (at Kalloni until 30 June 2014)
24 Greece DF Valentinos Vlachos (at Aris Saloniki until 30 June 2014)
No. Position Player
27 Belgium MF Jimmy De Jonghe (at Lierse until 30 June 2014)
25 Norway FW Mushaga Bakenga (at Esbjerg until 30 June 2014)
Latvia FW Valērijs Šabala (at Skonto FC until 31 June 2014)
 

Reserve team squad[edit]

As of 24 June 2013.

Note: Flags indicate national team as has been defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Position Player
Belgium GK Sven Delarbre
Belgium GK Arthur Hannes
Belgium DF Alexander Embrechts
Belgium DF Gauthier Libbrecht
Belgium MF Tom Pacquet
No. Position Player
Belgium MF Yannick Reuten
Belgium FW Hakim Borahsasar
Belgium FW Daan Debouver
Belgium FW Aaron Vanfleteren

Out on loan[edit]

Note: Flags indicate national team as has been defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Position Player
Belgium DF Jaan Vanwildemeersch (at KSV Oudenaarde until 30 June 2014)
 

Notable players[edit]

Club captains[edit]

 

Retired numbers[edit]

12 – The 12th man (reserved for the club supporters)

23Belgium François Sterchele, striker (2007–08). Posthumous; Sterchele died in a single-person car accident on 8 May 2008.

Club officials[edit]

Honorary presidents and directors[edit]

  • Belgium Dr. Michel D'Hooghe (Honorary president)
  • Belgium Fernand De Clerck (Honorary president)
  • Belgium Marcel Kyndt (Honorary vice-president)
  • Belgium Raoul Beuls (Honorary vice-president)
  • Belgium Chris Caestecker (Honorary director)
  • Belgium Guido Claeys (Honorary director)
  • Belgium Dr. William De Groote (Honorary director)
  • Belgium Guy Jacobs (Honorary director)
  • Belgium Pol Jonckheere (Honorary director)
  • Belgium André Piccu (Honorary director)
  • Belgium Herman Valcke (Honorary director)
  • Belgium Hugo Vandamme (Honorary director)
  • Belgium Dr. Roland Watteyne (Honorary director)

Board[edit]

  • Belgium Bart Verhaeghe (President)
  • Belgium Vincent Mannaert (Managing director)
  • Belgium Jan Boone (Director)
  • Belgium Bart Coeman (Director)
  • Belgium Sam Sabbe (Director)
  • Belgium Ignace Van Doorselaere (Director)

Presidential history[edit]

  • Belgium Philippe Delescluze (1891-00)
  • Belgium Albert Seligmann (1900–02)
  • Belgium Alfons De Meulemeester (1903–14)
  • Belgium Albert Dyserynck (1919–31)
  • Belgium Fernand Hanssens (1932–37)
  • Belgium Emile De Clerck (1937–59)
  • Belgium André De Clerck (1959–73)
  • Belgium Fernand De Clerck (1973–99)
  • Belgium Michel Van Maele (1999-03)
  • Belgium Dr. Michel D'Hooghe (2003–09)
  • Belgium Pol Jonckheere (2009–11)
  • Belgium Bart Verhaeghe (2011– )

Management[edit]

  • Belgium Vincent Mannaert (General manager)
  • Belgium Klaus Van Isacker (PR & Communications Manager)
  • Belgium Veroniek Degrande (Finance manager)
  • Belgium Evy Verhaeghe (Legal Manager)
  • Belgium Dagmar Decramer (Operations Manager)
  • Belgium Arnar Grétarsson (Sports Manager)

Coaching staff[edit]

Head coaches history[edit]

 

Medical staff[edit]

  • Belgium Dr. Roland Watteyne (Honorary director)
  • Belgium Dr. Jan De Neve (Head of medical services)
  • Belgium Dr. Kris Vandecasteele (Club doctor)
  • Belgium Dr. Pieter D'Hooghe (Club doctor/Orthopedic consultant)
  • Belgium Geert Ryckebusch (Physiotherapist)
  • Belgium Dimitri Dobbenie (Physiotherapist)
  • Belgium Hans Kerckaert (Physiotherapist)
  • Belgium Thomas Geschier (Physiotherapist)

Logistical staff[edit]

  • Belgium Lode Lobbestael (Team official)
  • Belgium Roger Tierenteyn (Logistical staff member)
  • Belgium Pascal Plovie (Logistical staff member)

Reserves coaching staff[edit]

  • Belgium Bart Wilmssen (Head coach)
  • Belgium Jannes Tant (Assistant coach)
  • Belgium Dirk Laleman (Physical coach)
  • Belgium Hans Kerckaert (Physiotherapist)
  • Belgium Kristoff Deryckere (Team mentor)
  • Belgium Michel Dierings (Team mentor)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]