Clyde, Ohio

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Clyde, Ohio
City
Downtown Clyde, Ohio on South Main Street.
Downtown Clyde, Ohio on South Main Street.
Location of Clyde, Ohio
Location of Clyde, Ohio
Coordinates: 41°18′18″N 82°58′36″W / 41.30500°N 82.97667°W / 41.30500; -82.97667Coordinates: 41°18′18″N 82°58′36″W / 41.30500°N 82.97667°W / 41.30500; -82.97667
Country United States
State Ohio
County Sandusky
Government
 • Mayor Scott Black
Area[1]
 • Total 5.09 sq mi (13.18 km2)
 • Land 5.04 sq mi (13.05 km2)
 • Water 0.05 sq mi (0.13 km2)
Elevation[2] 696 ft (212 m)
Population (2010)[3]
 • Total 6,325
 • Estimate (2012[4]) 6,297
 • Density 1,255.0/sq mi (484.6/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code 43410
Area code(s) 419
FIPS code 39-16308[5]
GNIS feature ID 1056817[2]
Website http://www.clydeohio.org/

Clyde /ˈkld/[6] is a city in Sandusky County, Ohio, United States. The population was 6,325 at the 2010 census. The National Arbor Day Foundation has designated Clyde as a Tree City USA.

The town is known for having served as the setting for Sherwood Anderson's 1919 collection of short stories Winesburg, Ohio.[7]

History[edit]

Clyde was named after Clyde, New York, the hometown of an early resident.[8]

Early in the 20th Century, Clyde joined the automobile revolution, hosting the pioneering brass era company, Elmore Manufacturing Company.

Geography[edit]

Clyde is located at 41°18′18″N 82°58′36″W / 41.30500°N 82.97667°W / 41.30500; -82.97667 (41.304912, -82.976529).[9]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 5.09 square miles (13.18 km2), of which, 5.04 square miles (13.05 km2) is land and 0.05 square miles (0.13 km2) is water.[1]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880 2,380
1890 2,327 −2.2%
1900 2,515 8.1%
1910 2,815 11.9%
1920 3,099 10.1%
1930 3,159 1.9%
1940 3,174 0.5%
1950 4,083 28.6%
1960 4,826 18.2%
1970 5,503 14.0%
1980 5,489 −0.3%
1990 5,776 5.2%
2000 6,064 5.0%
2010 6,325 4.3%
Est. 2012 6,297 −0.4%
Sources:[10][11][12][13][5][14]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[3] of 2010, there were 6,325 people, 2,484 households, and 1,687 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,255.0 inhabitants per square mile (484.6 /km2). There were 2,707 housing units at an average density of 537.1 per square mile (207.4 /km2). The racial makeup of the city was 94.4% White, 0.6% African American, 0.3% Native American, 0.4% Asian, 1.5% from other races, and 2.7% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.9% of the population.

There were 2,484 households of which 35.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.0% were married couples living together, 14.7% had a female householder with no husband present, 6.3% had a male householder with no wife present, and 32.1% were non-families. 26.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.50 and the average family size was 2.99.

The median age in the city was 37.4 years. 26.3% of residents were under the age of 18; 8.1% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 25.7% were from 25 to 44; 26.1% were from 45 to 64; and 13.8% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 48.7% male and 51.3% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[5] of 2000, there were 6,064 people, 2,304 households, and 1,633 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,381.5 people per square mile (533.3/km²). There were 2,471 housing units at an average density of 563.0 per square mile (217.3/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 96.04% White, 0.15% African American, 0.12% Native American, 0.26% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 2.21% from other races, and 1.19% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.70% of the population.

There were 2,304 households out of which 35.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.9% were married couples living together, 12.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.1% were non-families. 24.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.59 and the average family size was 3.07.

In the city the population was spread out with 27.0% under the age of 18, 8.7% from 18 to 24, 29.3% from 25 to 44, 22.2% from 45 to 64, and 12.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 91.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.4 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $39,764, and the median income for a family was $45,646. Males had a median income of $32,189 versus $23,549 for females. The per capita income for the city was $17,966. About 6.8% of families and 8.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 11.4% of those under age 18 and 7.9% of those age 65 or over.

Education[edit]

The nickname for Clyde's school sports teams is the Clyde Fliers.[15]

Schools[edit]

  • Clyde High School (Grades 9-12)
  • McPherson Middle School (Grades 6-8)
  • Clyde Elementary (Grades K-4)

Economy[edit]

Clyde is the home of a Whirlpool Corporation plant. Whirlpool is currently facing a lawsuit alleging that the plant is responsible for a cancer cluster including 35 known cases of affected children.[16] The lawsuit consists of 27 plaintiffs who claim that the plant released dangerous quantities of benzaldehyde. Whirlpool has denied the existence of a causal link between the plant and the cancers.[17]

Media[edit]

Clyde is served in print by The Clyde Enterprise, the city's only weekly newspaper, that is printed on every Wednesday. The city also has a local radio station, WHVT (90.5 FM)(http://www.cleanair.fm) which is owned and operated by Harvest Baptist Temple in Clyde, with a translator on 94.1 FM in nearby Findlay.

Notable residents[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-06. 
  2. ^ a b "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  3. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-06. 
  4. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-06-17. 
  5. ^ a b c "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  6. ^ "A Pronunciation Guide to Places in Ohio". E.W.Scripps School of Journalism. Retrieved 2008-12-19. 
  7. ^ Winesburg, Ohio, Sherwood Anderson, 1919. Chapter 1. Accessed 13 May 2007.
  8. ^ Meek, Basil (1909). Twentieth Century History of Sandusky County, Ohio and Representative Citizens. Whipporwill Publications. p. 311. 
  9. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  10. ^ "Population: Ohio". 1910 U.S. Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 28 November 2013. 
  11. ^ "Population: Ohio". 1930 US Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 28 November 2013. 
  12. ^ "Number of Inhabitants: Ohio". 18th Census of the United States. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 22 November 2013. 
  13. ^ "Ohio: Population and Housing Unit Counts". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 22 November 2013. 
  14. ^ "Incorporated Places and Minor Civil Divisions Datasets: Subcounty Population Estimates: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 25 November 2013. 
  15. ^ Clyde-Green Springs Schools. Accessed 13 May 2007.
  16. ^ http://www.toledoblade.com/local/2013/05/15/27-plaintiffs-sue-Whirlpool-over-Clyde-cancer-cluster.html
  17. ^ http://fox8.com/2013/05/27/residents-briefed-on-clyde-cancer-cluster-case/
  18. ^ [1]
  19. ^ James Birdseye McPherson, Major General, Union Commander, Army of Tennessee www.ngeorgia.com. Wayne Bengston, contributing editor. Accessed 13 May 2007.
  20. ^ NORRIS, George William - Biographical Information. Biographical Dictionary of the United States Congress. Accessed 13 May 2007.

External links[edit]