Clyde Park, Montana

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Clyde Park, Montana
Town
Location of Clyde Park, Montana
Location of Clyde Park, Montana
Coordinates: 45°53′6″N 110°36′13″W / 45.88500°N 110.60361°W / 45.88500; -110.60361Coordinates: 45°53′6″N 110°36′13″W / 45.88500°N 110.60361°W / 45.88500; -110.60361
Country United States
State Montana
County Park
Area[1]
 • Total 0.32 sq mi (0.83 km2)
 • Land 0.32 sq mi (0.83 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation 4,865 ft (1,483 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 288
 • Estimate (2012[3]) 291
 • Density 900.0/sq mi (347.5/km2)
Time zone Mountain (MST) (UTC-7)
 • Summer (DST) MDT (UTC-6)
ZIP code 59018
Area code(s) 406
FIPS code 30-15550
GNIS feature ID 0769943

Clyde Park is a town in Park County, Montana, United States. The population was 288 at the 2010 census. Originally known as Sunnyside, the town was renamed in the 1890s.[4]

History[edit]

Founded in the 1870s, the present-day site of Clyde Park was originally founded as Sunnyside by Texas cattlemen who were attracted to the area for grazing their herds. The post office in Sunnyside was established in 1887.[5] In 1887, a post office called Clyde Park was established at the historic Harvey and Tregloan Ranch, where John Harvey owned a Clydesdale horse which he had imported from England in the late 1890s.[4][6] A stagecoach from Livingston, Montana, reached the town in the 1880s.[7]

In 1901, the Clyde Park post office was merged with Sunnyside, and the town was renamed Clyde Park. However, the reason is unclear. Another source suggests that the town was called Clyde Park in honor of Clyde Durand, a local rancher; or for Harvey's Clydesdale horse.[5] The Harvey and Tregloan Ranch eventually was sold to Robert Shiplet. The present-day Shiplet Ranch has historic barns that date to the 1870s or 80s, and its livestock brand is notably the shape of Montana.[6]

In 1909 the Northern Pacific Railway established a branch line to the town, and in 1912 it incorporated as Clyde Park. That year it was reported to have a bank, a newspaper, a creamery, and an elevator.[8] A major fire burned much of the town in 1919.[5]

Today, Clyde Park is the home of the G Bar M Ranch, a 3,200-acre dude ranch that opened in 1934. The ranch itself dates back to 1900.[9] The town is also home to the Old Settler's Days, an annual celebration of pioneer history. It includes an art show, parade, and more.[10]

Geography[edit]

Situated in the Shields River valley, farmers near the town have won world prizes for raising grain.[11]

Clyde Park is located at 45°53′6″N 110°36′13″W / 45.88500°N 110.60361°W / 45.88500; -110.60361 (45.884921, -110.603485).[12] According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 0.32 square miles (0.83 km2), all of it land.[1]

Climate[edit]

This climatic region is typified by large seasonal temperature differences, with warm to hot (and often humid) summers and cold (sometimes severely cold) winters. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Clyde Park has a humid continental climate, abbreviated "Dfb" on climate maps.[13]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1920 352
1930 302 −14.2%
1940 216 −28.5%
1950 280 29.6%
1960 253 −9.6%
1970 244 −3.6%
1980 283 16.0%
1990 282 −0.4%
2000 310 9.9%
2010 288 −7.1%
U.S. Decennial Census[14]
Montana Cities/Towns: 1890-2000[15]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 288 people, 136 households, and 80 families residing in the town. The population density was 900.0 inhabitants per square mile (347.5/km2). There were 153 housing units at an average density of 478.1 per square mile (184.6/km2). The racial makeup of the town was 98.3% White, 0.7% Native American, 0.3% Asian, and 0.7% from other races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.0% of the population.

There were 136 households of which 25.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.8% were married couples living together, 9.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 1.5% had a male householder with no wife present, and 41.2% were non-families. 36.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.12 and the average family size was 2.79.

The median age in the town was 45.8 years. 21.2% of residents were under the age of 18; 4.8% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 22.6% were from 25 to 44; 36.5% were from 45 to 64; and 14.9% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the town was 50.7% male and 49.3% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[16] of 2000, there were 310 people,including 137 households, and 83 families residing in the town. The population density was 908.9 people per square mile (352.0/km²). There were 157 housing units at an average density of 460.3 per square mile (178.3/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 100.00% White. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.32% of the population.

There were 137 households out of which 27.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.3% were married couples living together, 3.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 38.7% were non-families. 35.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 18.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.26 and the average family size was 2.96.

In the town the population was spread out with 23.5% under the age of 18, 6.8% from 18 to 24, 23.5% from 25 to 44, 30.0% from 45 to 64, and 16.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43 years. For every 100 females there were 105.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 111.6 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $28,194, and the median income for a family was $35,278. Males had a median income of $27,500 versus $20,556 for females. The per capita income for the town was $15,646. About 2.2% of families and 10.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 11.5% of those under age 18 and 11.8% of those age 65 or over.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-12-18. 
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-12-18. 
  3. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-06-03. 
  4. ^ a b Capace, N. (2000) Encyclopedia of Montana. North American Book Dist LLC. p 212.
  5. ^ a b c Aarstad, R., Arguimabau, E., Baumler, E., et al. (2009) Montana Place Names: From Alzada to Zortman.Montana Historical Society. p 50.
  6. ^ a b Jiusto, C., Brown, C., and Ferris, T. (2012) Hand Raised: The Barns of Montana. Montana Historical Society. p 240.
  7. ^ Jewell, J. and McRae, W.C. (2012) Moon Montana. Avalon Travel. p 360.
  8. ^ (1912) Montana. Bureau of Agriculture, Labor and Industry Department of Publicity. p 261.
  9. ^ Rowles, G. (2011) Montana Adventure Guide. Hunter Publishing. p 183.
  10. ^ (2010) Fodor's Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks. Fodor's. p 29.
  11. ^ (1921) Montana: Resources and Opportunities. Montana Department of Agriculture, Labor, and Industry. p 47.
  12. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  13. ^ Climate Summary for Clyde Park, Montana
  14. ^ U.S. Decennial Census
  15. ^ POPULATION OF INCORPORATED PLACES* (CITIES/TOWNS) IN MONTANA, 1890 TO 2000
  16. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31.