Coat of arms of Darwin

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Coat of Arms of the City of Darwin
Darwin COA.png
Details
Armiger Lord Mayors of Darwin
Adopted 1959
Crest Mariner’s Compass and Mural Crown
Torse None
Escutcheon Fort, Ship, Propeller and Encircled Star
Supporters Australian Aborigine and European miner
Compartment Grassy Green Land
Motto Latin: Progrediamur

The Coat of arms of Darwin were granted by the Queen on 9 December 1959 - the same year in which Darwin was granted city status.

Blazon[edit]

Shield[edit]

The Arms is consist of a red shield.

  • The upper part shield has gateway within the fort which represents the idea of Darwin being the gateway to and from Australia and the masonry on the walls of the fort bears a number of crosses. This signifies the important role the Church had in the development of this city.
  • The middle right corner has a sailing ship signifies that an important factor in selecting the site of Darwin was the existence of natural port facilities, and the sailing ship indicates that the year of establishment was prior to the days of steam.
  • The middle left corner has old style propeller which indicating Darwin's selection as an airport site early in its life.
  • The base of the shield has encircled star, which is from the Arms of Charles Darwin, after whom the city was named.

Crest[edit]

Above the shield is the silver helmet with red and white mantling and above the helmet there is silver mural crown, and on crown there is mariner's compass Gules and its northerly point is particularly highlighted. This represents Darwin's position as a northern city.

Supporters[edit]

On the left side of the shield there is an Australian Aborigine which representing the early inhabitants of the Darwin area, and on the right side of the shiled a European miner, who depicts an important industry which aided Darwin's growth.

Base[edit]

The base of the shield is on a grassy green land.

Motto[edit]

A scroll below the arms has a Latin motto Progrediamur which translates as "Let us go forward'."

References[edit]