Coat of arms of the King of Spain

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Coat of arms of the King of Spain
Coat of Arms of Spanish Monarch.svg
Details
Armiger Felipe VI
Adopted 19 June 2014
Crest Spanish Royal Crown
Escutcheon Quarterly: Castile, León, Aragon, and Navarre; enté en point: Granada; inescutcheon Bourbon (Anjou Branch)
Orders Order of the Golden Fleece
Earlier versions See below

The blazoning of the coat of arms of the King of Spain is regulated by the Royal Decree 527/2014, 20 June, an amendment to Title II of Spanish Royal Decree 1511/1977 adopting Flags, Standards, Guidons, Insignia and Emblems Regulation.[1] The coat of arms was adopted when King Felipe VI was enthroned as King of Spain.[2]

Official blazon[edit]

The shield is divided into four quarters, blazoned as follows:

  • 1st, gules a castle or, triple-embattled and voided gate and windows, with three towers each triple-turreted, of the field, masoned sable and ajoure azure, which is for Castile;
  • 2nd, argent a lion rampant purpure crowned or, langued and armed, of the second, which is for León;
  • 3rd, or, four pallets gules, which is for Aragon;
  • 4th, gules a cross, saltire and orle of chains linked together or, a centre point vert, which is for Navarre;

Argent enté en point, with a pomegranate proper seeded gules, supported, sculpted and leafed in two leaves vert, which is for Granada.

Inescutcheon azure bordure gules, three fleurs-de-lys or, which is for Bourbon-Anjou.

All surrounded by the collar of the Golden Fleece and crowned with a crown of the same metal and precious stones, with eight rosettes, five visible, and eight pearls interspersed, closed at the top by eight diadems also adorned with pearls and surmounted by a cross on a globe, which is the royal crown of Spain.[3]

In 1969, General Francisco Franco appointed Juan Carlos I as his "successor to the Headship of the Spanish state with the title of King" but gave him the new title of Prince of Spain instead of the traditional title of Prince of Asturias. From 1971 to 1975, Juan Carlos as Prince of Spain used a coat of arms which was virtually identical to the one later adopted when he became King in 1975. Earlier coat of arms differed only that it featured the royal crown of a Crown Prince of Spain, the King's royal crown has eight half-arches of which five are visible, while the Prince's one has only four half-arches of which three are visible.[4] Joined to the shield was the red saltire of Burgundy and, to the dexter and sinister of the base point, the yoke gules in its natural position with ribbons, of the field, and the sheaf of five arrows gules with the arrowheads inverted and ribbons, of the field, which used to be the symbol of the Catholic Monarchs of Spain.

Since June 2014, Juan Carlos's son, Felipe VI, has been using the same arms but without the cross of Burgundy, yoke and arrows.[5] King Juan Carlos's arms include a red lion instead of the purple one displayed on the current version[6]

Variants[edit]

Variants of the coat of arms of the King of Spain
Coat of Arms of Spanish Monarch-Variant as Grand Master of the Order of Charles III.svg
Coat of Arms of Spanish Monarch-Variant as Grand Master of the Order of Saint Ferdinand.svg
Coat of Arms of Spanish Monarch-Variant as Grand Master of the Order of Saint Hermenegild.svg
Variant as Grand Master of the
Order of Charles III
Surrounded by the collar of this order
Variant as Grand Master of the
Order of Saint Ferdinand

Surrounded by the grand master's collar
of this order

Variant as Grand Master of the
Order of Saint Hermenegild
Surrounded by the grand master's collar
of this order

Ornamented versions of the historical royal coats of arms[edit]

For common versions and the changes of the heraldic charges and the divisions of the field, see Coat of arms of Spain.
Royal Arms Monarch Supporters Other ornaments Motto
House of Trastamara (1475–1506)
Ornamented Coat of Arms of Queen Isabella of Castile (1474-1492).svg

The Catholic Monarchs
(1474–1492)

  • The former royal crown
Ornamented Coat of Arms of Queen Isabella of Castile (1492-1504).svg

The Catholic Monarchs
(1492–1504)

  • Two lions
  • The Eagle of St John
    (as displayed at the Church of St Paul in Valladolid)
  • The crown of the Catholic Monarchs
  • A yoke
  • A sheaf of five arrows

Tanto monta
(Spanish: They amount to the same)

Coat of Arms of Ferdinand II of Aragon with supporters (1513-1516).svg

Ferdinand II of Aragon
(1504–1516)
(After the death of queen Isabella)

  • The former royal crown of Aragon
Ornamented Coat of Arms of Queen Joanna of Castile.svg

Joanna of Castile
(1504–1506)

  • The former royal crown
  • A yoke
  • A sheaf of five arrows
Full Ornamented Coat of Arms of Philip I of Castile.svg

Philip I of Castile
(1504–1506)
(with Joanna)

  • The Eagle of St John and one lion
    (as displayed on his seal)
  • The royal crest of Castile
  • The former royal crown
  • A helmet
  • Gold and ermine mantling
  • The Order of the Golden Fleece

Qui voudra
(Old French: Whoever will accept)

House of Habsburg (1506–1700)
Full Ornamented Coat of Arms of Charles I of Spain (1516-1520).svg

Charles I
King of Castile
(1506–1516)
Spanish Monarch
(1516–1520)

  • The Eagle of St John and one lion
    (as displayed on his seal)
  • The royal crest of Castile
  • The former royal crown
  • A helmet
  • Gold and ermine mantling
  • The Order of the Golden Fleece

Plus oultre
Later Plus ultra
(Latin: Further beyond)

Full Ornamented Coat of Arms of Charles I of Spain (1520-1530).svg

Charles I
(1520-1530)

  • The Eagle of St John and one lion
  • The royal crest of Castile
  • The former royal crown
  • A helmet
  • Gold and ermine mantling
  • The Order of the Golden Fleece

Plus ultra

Ornamented Coat of Arms of Charles I of Spain, Charles V as Holy Roman Emperor (1530-1556).svg

Charles I
Charles V
as Holy Roman Emperor
(1530-1556)

  • The imperial crest
  • The imperial crown
  • A helmet
  • Gold and ermine mantling
  • The Order of the Golden Fleece

Plus ultra

Full Ornamented Coat of arms of Philip II of Spain (1556–1558).svg

Philip II
(1556-1558)
Also King Jure Uxoris of England with Mary I

  • The royal crest of Aragon
  • The royal crest of Castile
  • The royal crest of England
  • The former royals crowns of Aragon, Castile and the former English Imperial Crown
  • Three helmets
  • Gold and ermine mantling
  • The Order of the Golden Fleece and the Order of the Garter

Nec spe, nec metu
(Latin: Neither for hope nor for fear) Probably has its origins in Stoicism.

Full Ornamented Coat of arms of Philip II of Spain (1558–1580).svg

Philip II
(1558-1580)

  • The Eagle of St John and one lion
  • The royal crest of Aragon
  • The royal crest of Castile
  • The former royals crowns of Aragon and Castile
  • Two helmets
  • Gold and ermine mantling
  • The Order of the Golden Fleece

Nec spe, nec metu

Full Ornamented Coat of Arms of Philip II of Spain (1580-1598).svg

Philip II
(1580-1598)

  • Two lions
  • The royal crest of Aragon
  • The royal crest of Castile
  • The royal crest of Portugal
  • The former royals crowns of Aragon, Castile and Portugal
  • Three helmets
  • Gold and ermine mantling
  • The Order of the Golden Fleece

Non sufficit orbis
(Latin: The world is not enough) Satires of Juvenal (Book IV/10)

Full Ornamented Coat of Arms of Philip III of Spain.svg

Philip III
(1598-1621)

  • Two lions
  • The royal crest of Aragon
  • The royal crest of Castile
  • The royal crest of Portugal
  • The former royals crowns of Aragon, Castile and Portugal
  • Three helmets
  • Gold and ermine mantling
  • The Order of the Golden Fleece

Ad utrumque
(Latin: Ready for either alternative)

Full Ornamented Royal Coat of Arms of Spain (1621-1668).svg

Philip IV
(1621-1665)
Charles II
(1665-1700)

  • Two lions
  • The royal crest of Castile
  • The former royal crown
  • A helmet
  • Gold and ermine mantling
  • The Order of the Golden Fleece

Ad utrumque

House of Bourbon (1700–1808 / 1813-1868 / 1874-1931)
Full Ornamented Royal Coat of Arms of Spain (1700-1761).svg

Philip V
(First reign)
(1700-1724)
Louis
(1724)
Philip V
(Second reign)
(1724-1746)
Ferdinand VI
(1746-1759)
Charles III
(1759-1761)

  • The sun
  • The royal crest of Castile
  • The former royal crown
  • The royal mantle
  • The modern royal crown
    (with eight half-arches)
  • A helmet
  • Gold and ermine mantling
  • The Order of the Golden Fleece
  • The Order of the Holy Spirit
  • A solis ortu usque ad occasum
    (Latin: From the rising up of the sun unto the going down of the same) V. 3, Psalm 112
  • Plus ultra
  • Santiago
Full Ornamented Royal Coat of Arms of Spain (1761-1868 and 1874-1931).svg

Charles III
(1761-1788)
Charles IV
(1788-1808)
Ferdinand VII
(1808)
Ferdinand VII
(Restored)
(1808-1833)
Isabella II
(1833-1868)
Alfonso XII
(1874-1885)
Alfonso XIII
(1886-1931)

  • Two angels
    (as well as a lance with two royal standards)
  • The Pillars of Hercules
  • The sun
  • The royal crest of Castile
  • The former royal crown
  • The royal mantle
  • The modern royal crown
    (with eight half-arches)
  • A helmet
  • Gold and ermine mantling
  • The Order of the Golden Fleece
  • The Order of Charles III
  • A solis ortu usque ad occasum
  • Plus ultra
  • Santiago
French occupation (1808–1813)
Grand Coat of Arms of Joseph Bonaparte as King of Spain.svg

Joseph Bonaparte
(1808–1813)

  • Two sceptres
  • The modern royal crown
    (with eight half-arches)
  • The royal mantle
  • The Order of the Golden Fleece
  • The Legion of Honour
House of Savoy (1870–1873)
Coat of Arms of King Amadeo of Spain (1871-1873).svg

Amadeus
(1870–1873)

  • The modern royal crown
    (with eight half-arches)
  • The royal mantle
  • The Order of the Golden Fleece
House of Bourbon (1931)
Full Ornamented Royal Coat of Arms of Spain (1931).svg

Alfonso XIII
(1931)

  • Two angels
    (as well as a lance with two royal standards)
  • The Pillars of Hercules
  • The modern royal crown
    (with eight half-arches)
  • A helmet
  • Gold and ermine mantling
  • The Order of the Golden Fleece
  • The Order of Charles III
  • Plus ultra
Coat of Arms of Juan Carlos I of Spain.svg

Juan Carlos I
(1975)

  • The modern royal crown
    (with eight half-arches)
  • The Order of the Golden Fleece
  • A yoke
  • A sheaf of five arrows

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Real Decreto 527/2014, de 20 de junio, por el que se crea el Guión y el Estandarte de Su Majestad el Rey Felipe VI y se modifica el Reglamento de Banderas y Estandartes, Guiones, Insignias y Distintivos, aprobado por Real Decreto 1511/1977, de 21 de enero." [Royal Decree 527/2014 setting up the Guidon and Standard of HM King Felipe VI and amends Standards, Guidons, Insignia and Emblems Regulation, adopted on Royal Decree 1511/1977]. BOE Spanish Official Journal (in Spanish). 20 June 2014. Retrieved 2014-06-21. 
  2. ^ "Felipe VI ya cuenta con escudo y guión propios" [Felipe VI has his own coat of arms and guidon]. www.heraldo.es (in Spanish). 2014-06-19. Retrieved 2014-06-20. 
  3. ^ Coat of arms of His Majesty the King of Spain. The Royal Household of the King of Spain. Retrieved 19 October 2011.
  4. ^ (Spanish) Spanish Decree 814 of 22nd April 1971. Boletín Oficial del Estado, Official Gazette of the Spanish Government, no. 99. Retrieved 19 October 2011.
  5. ^ "Coat of arms of His Majesty King Juan Carlos". Spanish Royal Household Website. 2014-06-19. Retrieved 2014-06-20. 
  6. ^ "Coat of arms of His Majesty the King". Spanish Royal Household Website. 2014-06-19. Retrieved 2014-06-20. 

External links[edit]