Coca-Cola Metbank Pro50 Championship

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Coca-Cola Pro50 Championship
Metbank.jpg
Countries Zimbabwe
Administrator ZC
Format List A
First tournament 2002
Tournament format Round-robin and knockout
Number of teams 5
Current champion Zimbabwe Southern Rocks (1st title)
Most successful Zimbabwe Easterns (3 titles)
Most runs Zimbabwe Tino Mawoyo (758)
Most wickets Zimbabwe Natsai Mushangwe (33)
Website Coca-Cola Pro50 Championship 2011/12
2011-12 Coca-Cola Pro50 Championship

The Coca-Cola Pro50 Championship, formerly known as the Faithwear Metbank One-Day Competition or the Metbank Pro40 Championship, or the Faithwear Inter-Provincial Tournament is the premier List A cricket tournament in Zimbabwe, organized by Zimbabwe Cricket. This tournament was started after Zimbabwean cricket crisis, recommended by the International Cricket Council or ICC. It is jointly sponsored by Metbank and Coca-Cola.

Participating teams[edit]

Former Teams[edit]

2002-06 Seasons[edit]

2007-09 seasons[edit]

Tournaments[edit]

Before the reorganization of cricket in Zimbabwe, this tournament was known as the Faithwear Inter-Clothing Tournament or Faithwear Inter-Provincial One-Day Series.[1]

2002/03 season[edit]

Four teams participated in this inaugural tournament (before the Zimbabwean cricket crisis). They included Mashonaland, Manicaland, Matabeleland and Midlands. Star players like Andy Flower, Grant Flower, Guy Whittall, Mluleki Nkala, Craig Wishart, Henry Olonga, Heath Streak, Stuart Carlisle, Craig Wishart, Sean Ervine and Brian Murphy took part in this tournament.

Mashonaland won the tournament, defeating Midlands chasing a target over 300. It was quite unsurprising considering that the Mashonaland team had both the Flower brothers on their side. When Midlands batted first, Craig Wishart led the way with 121. He got valuable support from the top order that included Terry Duffin, Travis Friend and Dougie Marillier. After Wishart's departure Sean Ervine hit a lightning unbeaten fifty that took the score to an imposing 300/5. Midlands began their fielding display well, dismissing both openers with the score at 31, but no match is won unless the Flower brothers are dismissed. Both the brothers struck centuries at better than a run-a-ball, in an unbroken partnership of 279 runs. So dominant were they that they still had 28 balls spare when the winning runs were scored.[2] With Manicaland losing in Bulawayo, Mashonaland were crowned the inaugural Faithwear One-Day Series champions, winning five of their matches, against three each by Matabeleland and Manicaland.[3][4]

Andy Flower was the highest run scorer with 482 runs at an average of 160.66,[5] while Mluleki Nkala was the highest wicket-taker with 13 scalps.[6]

2003/04 season[edit]

Mashonaland successfully retained their title in this tournament, coasting to victory by six wickets against Midlands in the final. Midlands had a steady opening partnership only to see a middle-order collapse and were bowled out for 168. Mashonaland coasted to the victory with Elton Chigumbura scoring 49*.[7]

Piet Rinke top-scored in the tournament with 269 runs,[8] while Blessing Mahwire was the top wicket-taker with 13 wickets.[9]

Mashonaland had also finished first in their group.[10]

2004/05 season[edit]

  • Champions: Matabeleland
  • Runners-up: Namibia

For this season, Namibia was added to the number of participating teams. They immediately made an impression, finishing runners-up finishing behind only champions Matabeleland. Matabeleland easily was the strongest team in the tournament, and the team particularly weakened was Mashonaland who finished bottom of the group league, as they were coupled by the loss of the Flower brothers, after the player walkout of 2004.[11]

Matabeleland won the tournament after their fourth successive victory against Midlands by 58 runs. After Sean Williams's 61 ensured they reached 222, Midlands were bowled out for 164, with Keith Dabengwa taking 4-20. On the other hand, a shell-shocked Mashonaland side who had finished bottom of the league, called back 2004 rebels Trevor Gripper and Neil Ferreira who had performed well in club cricket (although it is unclear whether Zimbabwe Cricket approved their selection). Both Gripper and Ferreira led Mashonaland to victory, with Gripper scoring 71 and Ferreira 45. They beat Manicaland by 14 runs, but it was nothing more than just a consolation.[12]

Particularly, Matabeleland's Mark Vermeulen had a wonderful tournament being the top run-getter with 271 runs at a vastly impressive average of 90.33 and a top score of 105.[13] Christopher Mpofu also rose to prominence by being the top wicket-taker with 11 wickets.[14]

2005/06 season[edit]

This was the last tournament played with the traditional teams, with Masvingo being an additional team now. Masvingo repeated Namibia's newcomer success the previous season by finishing at the same second place behind champions Matabeleland. Matabeleland once again retained the title they won the previous season. Mashonaland's performances were better than it was last year, finishing in fourth place, but it was no where near the peaks it once ruled.[15]

In the series decider between Matabeleland and Masvingo, the Matabeles retained the title at a canter, crushing their opponents by eight wickets. Masvingo never recovered from the early heap of wickets and only Robertson Chinyengetere (34) built any substantial innings as Tawanda Mupariwa (3/29) and Greg Strydom (4/20) did most of the damage. The Matabeles were given a solid start by Terry Duffin (20) and Tinashe Hove (56*) as Matabeleland romped to the win with more than 23 overs spare. The result meant that they won all the four matches they played.[16]

Elton Chigumbura was the top run-scorer with 116 runs from 2 games,[17] while Christopher Mpofu was once again the leading wicket-taker with 9 wickets from 4 matches.[18]

After the Zimbabwean cricket season of 2005/06, Cricinfo reporter Steven Price wrote an article describing the season detail-by-detail.[19]

After the Faithwear Cup was over, John Ward wrote on Cricinfo an article named "A brief history of Zimbabwe cricket". Here, he ended the article by saying that,"The 2005-06 Logan Cup never took place after a disastrous Faithwear Trophy when sides were so feeble as to be embarrassing. ZC revamped the system, removed Mashonaland and Matabeleland (two of the leading opponents of the Chingoka regime) and unveilled a new competition for 2006-07."[20]

2006-07 season[edit]

The Faithwear series went without any glitches in 2007, with the Mashonaland selection issues having been, for the most part, buried. While the quality of cricket wasn't all that high, there were some close contests, such as Centrals last ball win over Westerns, thanks to Solomon Mire's 79 not out, and Westerns 2 run victory over Southerns. But there were also some absolute drubbings, with the class of Easterns too much for Southerns, who lost with 117 balls remaining, and Westerns 88 run win, bowling Northerns out for just 133.

For 50 over matches, Zimbabwe Cricket would have been disappointed that the average score was in the low 200's. Centrals 8/263 from 43 overs, thanks to a 94 run slog from Solomon Mire - who smashed 5 sixes and 7 fours in his 67 balls - was the highest score of the competition.

However, the countries top cricketers were involved in the ICC World Cup in the West Indies, leaving the second tier - such as Tino Mawoyo, Graeme Cremer and Timycen Maruma - with more responsibility than they could handle. The absence of the big name players would have almost certainly been behind the series of low scores throughout the tournament.[21]

2007/08 season[edit]

The Faithwear series ran successfully after many delays which saw the series postponed several months. Unfortunately, the quality of cricket was not all that high, with teams still struggling to score well.

For the second year running, Zimbabwe Cricket would have been disappointed that the average score in these 50 over matches was just over 140.

The only decent scores of the series came from Centrals and Easterns. Centrals scored 6/237 in their loss to Easterns, with Easterns scoring 2/197, thinks to Timycen Maruma's 83, from 31 overs due to Duckworth-Lewis.

Easterns also brought their A game to the "final". The final match of the series was between Northerns and Easterns, who both on equal number of wins, were essentially playing for the title. Easterns scored 9/249, the highest total of the series, which was too much for Northerns who struggled, scoring just 157.[22]

After the end of the tournament, Steven Price reported on Cricinfo about the state of cricket in Zimbabwe, where top Zimbabwean cricketers have resorted to black market hustling to survive.[23]

2008/09 season[edit]

It was the Faithwear series that kicked off the official domestic cricket season in Zimbabwe for 2008-09. This season saw the exclusion of Southerns, the feeling being that reducing the domestic competitions to 4 teams would increase the quality of cricket being played as a result of greater competition for squad places. This turned out to be very accurate with some very promising performances.

Centrals, who gained many of Southerns former players, became a much more competitive team, posting 3 scores over 200; Easterns, Northerns and Westerns only reached 200 twice. Despite this, Centrals won the wooden spoon. It was Easterns who continued their domestic dominance with 5 wins from their 6 matches (the other match was abandoned), winning the Faithwear cup.

The big news from this series was Mark Vermeulen's return to cricket. After burning down the Zimbabwe Cricket Academy in late 2006 his cricket career appeared to be over. But after being granted a second chance by Zimbabwe Cricket, he made his comeback in the 2008-09 Faithwear series.

Many players missed the beginning of the tournament due to the Zimbabwe A tour of Namibia and South Africa.[24]

The following tournaments happened after the reorganization of Zimbabwean cricket:

2009/10 season[edit]

The first tournament held after reorganization of Zimbabwean cricket was in 2009-10. The inaugural opening match was played between eventual champions Mountaineers and Mashonaland Eagles. Mountaineers won the match by 4 wickets.[25]

Eventually four teams qualified for the semi-finals, Mashonaland Eagles, Mountaineers, Mid West Rhinos and Southern Rocks.[26]

In the 1st Semi-Final, Mid West Rhinos qualified for the finals after defeating the Eagles.[27] In the 2nd Semi-Final, Mountaineers defeated the Rocks to get into the final.[28] In the final played at Mutare Sports Club, Mountaineers managed a narrow three-wicket victory in a thoroughly competitive game against the Rhinos to win the tournament. Chasing the Rhino's paltry total of 144, Mountaineers slipped to 66/7 before a brilliant fightback by tailenders Shingirai Masakadza (41*) and captain Prosper Utseya (30*) took them to victory.[29]

Group Stage[edit]

Team Pld W L T N/R Pts Net R/R
Mountaineers 8 6 1 0 1 28 +0.781
Mid West Rhinos 8 5 3 0 0 20 +0.073
Mashonaland Eagles 8 3 3 0 2 16 −0.021
Southern Rocks 8 3 4 0 1 14 −0.293
Matabeleland Tuskers 8 1 7 0 0 4 −0.487
Source:CricketArchive[30]

Semi-finals[edit]

7 April
16:00
Scorecard
Mashonaland Eagles Zimbabwe
221/9 (50 overs)
v
Zimbabwe Mid West Rhinos
222/8 (46.3 overs)
Regis Chakabva 62 (52)
Michael Chinouya 3/20 (5 overs)
Riki Wessels 70 (94)
Elton Chigumbura 2/42 (7 overs)
Mid West Rhinos won by 2 wickets
Kwekwe Sports Club, Kwekwe
Umpires: Lucky Ngwenya and Justice Tapfumaneyi
  • Mid West Rhinos, who chose to field
7 April
16:00
Scorecard
Southern Rocks Zimbabwe
131 (39.5 overs)
v
Zimbabwe Mountaineers
134/3 (19.5 overs)
Steve Tikolo 37 (79)
Shingirai Masakadza 3/20 (6 overs)
Hamilton Masakadza 44 (24)
Hilary Matanga 2/33 (5 overs)
Mountaineers won by 7 wickets
Mutare Sports Club, Mutare
Umpires: Jeremiah Matibiri and Langton Rusere
  • Mountaineers, who chose to field

Final[edit]

10 April
16:00
Scorecard
Mid West Rhinos Zimbabwe
144 (35.5 overs)
v
Zimbabwe Mountaineers
149/7 (37.5 overs)
Bothwell Chapungu 27 (36)
Prosper Utseya 3/24 (8.5 overs)
Shingirai Masakadza 41* (68)
Ed Rainsford 4/48 (10 overs)
Mountaineers won by 3 wickets
Mutare Sports Club, Mutare
Umpires: Jeremiah Matibiri and Justice Tapfumaneyi
Player of the match: Shingirai Masakadza (Mountaineers) and Prosper Utseya (Mountaineers)
  • Mountaineers, who chose to field
  • Mountaineers won the Faithwear Metbank One-Day Competition

Tino Mawoyo was the tournament's highest run-getter with 424 runs at an average of 60.57,[31] while Natsai Mushangwe was the tournament's highest wicket-taker with 14 scalps to his name, taken at an average of 11.42.[32]

2010/11 season[edit]

For this season, the tournament was renamed as the Metbank Pro40 Championship. It was won by a star-studded and a pre-tournament favourite Southern Rocks. They defeated the Mid West Rhinos in the final by a massive eight wickets at the Harare Sports Club, Harare. The Rhinos had now reached two finals in two consecutive tournaments, only to lose.[33] Rocks opener Sikandar Raza's brilliant 44 further made a case for his consideration for selection by the Zimbabwean national selectors. The Rocks side had contained stars such as Steve Tikolo, Chamu Chibhabha, Raza, Craig Ervine, Blessing Mahwire, Alester Maregwede, Stuart Matsikenyeri, Tatenda Taibu and Brian Vitori.[34]

Along with the Rocks, the Mountaineers, Matabeleland Tuskers and Mid West Rhinos qualified for the semis. Mashonaland Eagles were the only team that did not progress from the initial round-robin.[35]

The first semi-final at Harare was won by eventual champions Rocks who decimitated the Matabeleland Tuskers batting line-up. The Tuskers were shot out for 94, with Brian Vitori of the Rocks leading the way with a five-wicket haul.[36] The second semi, played between the Mountaineers and Mid West Rhinos at Harare signalled the elimination of defending champions Mountaineers. After the Rhinos compiled a gettable total of 200/6 with Malcolm Waller getting a 54 and a late fightback by the tail which saw Solomon Mire compile 45*, Mountaineers were shot out for 84 with spinner Graeme Cremer finishing with 4/13.[37] The final at Harare was won by the Rocks by eight wickets.[38]

The tournaments's highest run-getter was Jonathan Beukes, an overseas South African player, who scored 301 runs,[39] while Natsai Mushangwe once again was the top wicket-taker with 13 wickets.[40]

Group Stage[edit]

Team Pld W L T N/R Pts Net R/R
Mountaineers 8 5 2 0 1 24 +0.861
Matabeleland Tuskers 8 3 2 0 3 18 -0.413
Southern Rocks 8 3 3 0 2 16 +0.145
Mid West Rhinos 8 2 3 0 3 14 −0.454
Mashonaland Eagles 8 2 5 0 1 10 −0.408
Source:Cricinfo[41]

Semi-Finals[edit]

25 March
16:00
Scorecard
Mid West Rhinos Zimbabwe
200/6 (40 overs)
v
Zimbabwe Mountaineers
84 (25 overs)
Malcolm Waller 54 (64)
Shingirai Masakadza 2/17 (5 overs)
Kevin Kasuza 30 (49)
Graeme Cremer 4/13 (7 overs)
Mid West Rhinos won by 116 runs
Harare Sports Club, Harare
Umpires: Ian Robinson and Langton Rusere
  • Mountaineers, who chose to field
26 March
16:00
Scorecard
Matabeleland Tuskers Zimbabwe
94 (31.1 overs)
v
Zimbabwe Southern Rocks
97/1 (20.3 overs)
Bradley Staddon 25 (50)
Brian Vitori 5/26 (7.1 overs)
Chamu Chibhabha 45* (56)
Christopher Mpofu 1/23 (6 overs)
Southern Rocks won by 9 wickets
Harare Sports Club, Harare
Umpires: Owen Chirombe and Trevor Phiri
  • Matabeleland Tuskers, who chose to bat

Final[edit]

27 March
16:00
Scorecard
Mid West Rhinos Zimbabwe
151 (36.4 overs)
v
Zimbabwe Southern Rocks
155/2 (34.5 overs)
Malcolm Waller 68 (82)
Tafadzwa Kamungozi 3/35 (8 overs)
Sikandar Raza 44 (72)
Malcolm Waller 1/14 (2 overs)
Southern Rocks won by 8 wickets
Harare Sports Club, Harare
Umpires: Jeremiah Matibiri and Russell Tiffin
  • Southern Rocks, who chose to field
  • Southern Rocks won the Metbank Pro40 Championship

2011/12 season[edit]

After a 40-over tournament in 2010/11, the tournament was again increased to a 50-over a side affair. The new sponsors of the tournament was cold drinks brand Coca-Cola.[42] The tournament is currently in progress, in the round robin. So far, Mashonaland Eagles are at the top of the group. They are having a 100% record by winning four out of four played matches.[43] As of proceedings so far, Stuart Matsikenyeri is the top run-getter with 227 runs,[44] while Mark Mbofana is the top wicket-taker with 6 wickets.[45]

Group Stage[edit]

Team Pld W L T N/R Pts Net R/R
Mashonaland Eagles 4 4 0 0 0 18 +1.616
Mid West Rhinos 3 1 1 1 0 7 -0.538
Southern Rocks 3 1 1 1 0 6 -0.085
Matabeleland Tuskers 3 1 2 0 0 4 +0.613
Mountaineers 3 0 3 0 0 0 −2.060
Source:Cricinfo[46]

Final[edit]

3 March
16:00
[Scorecard]
TBA
v
TBA
To be determined
Umpires: To be determined

Source: "Coca-Cola Pro50 Championship Fixtures" Cricinfo.

Match of the tournament[edit]

Perhaps the match of the tournament was between Southern Rocks and Mid West Rhinos. It was a brilliantly played, competitive tied match with the scores finishing level, the first tie in the history of the tournament. After brilliant innings by Vusi Sibanda, Gary Ballance, Brendan Taylor, and Malcolm Waller's fiery 86 off 59 ensured the Rhinos reached an imposing total of 305/8. The start of the Rocks' innings lacked the same fluency but Tatenda Taibu's brilliant century in which he shared a 166-run stand with Robertson Chinyengetere tilted the match in their favour. Needing 77 from under 12 overs, the Rocks' had a mini-collapse instituted by Simon Mugava but Tendai Chisoro's rapid 29 took Rocks' close before a last-ditch effort by Hilary Matanga ensured the scores finished level. On the other hand, Stuart Matsikenyeri's century for Mashonaland Eagles on the same day ensured they defeated Mountaineers. The Eagles solidified their position on the top of the group with this win.[47]

Statistics[edit]

Notes[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Zimbabwean Domestic Cricket on BRMTaylor BRMTaylor.com. Retrieved 27 January 2012
  2. ^ Mashonaland win one-day series after Flower centuries ESPNCricinfo. Retrieved 4 December 2011
  3. ^ Manicaland lose by 3 wickets despite Whittall century ESPNCricinfo. Retrieved 4 December 2011
  4. ^ 2002/03 Faithwear Inter-Provincial One-Day Series Points Table ESPNCricinfo. Retrieved 4 December 2011
  5. ^ 2002/03 Faithwear Inter-Provincial One-Day Series Most Runs ESPNCricinfo. Retrieved 4 December 2011
  6. ^ 2002/03 Faithwear Inter-Provincial One-Day Series Most Wickets ESPNCricinfo. Retrieved 4 December 2011
  7. ^ Mashonaland coast to victory ESPNCricinfo. Retrieved 4 December 2011
  8. ^ 2003/04 Faithwear Inter-Provincial One-Day Series Most Runs ESPNCricinfo. Retrieved 4 December 2011
  9. ^ 2003/04 Faithwear Inter-Provincial One-Day Series Most Wickets ESPNCricinfo. Retrieved 4 December 2011
  10. ^ 2003/04 Faithwear Inter-Provincial One-Day Series Points Table ESPNCricinfo. Retrieved 4 December 2011
  11. ^ 2004/05 Faithwear Inter-Provincial One-Day Series Points Table ESPNCricinfo. Retrieved 4 December 2011
  12. ^ Matabeleland make it four straight wins ESPNCricinfo. Retrieved 4 December 2011
  13. ^ Faithwear Inter-Provincial One-Day Series 2004/05 Most Runs ESPNCricinfo. Retrieved 4 December 2011
  14. ^ Faithwear Inter-Provincial One-Day Series 2004/05 Most Wickets ESPNCricinfo. Retrieved 4 December 2011
  15. ^ Faithwear Inter-Provincial One-Day Series 2005/06 Points Table ESPNCricinfo. Retrieved 4 December 2011
  16. ^ Matabeleland retain Faithwear title at a canter ESPNCricinfo. Retrieved 4 December 2011
  17. ^ 2005/06 Faithwear Inter-Provincial One-Day Series Most Runs ESPNCricinfo. Retrieved 4 December 2011
  18. ^ 2005/06 Faithwear Inter-Provincial One_Day Series Most Wickets ESPNCricinfo. Retrieved 4 December 2011
  19. ^ Much ado about nothing ESPNCricinfo. Retrieved 4 December 2011
  20. ^ A brief history of Zimbabwe cricket ESPNCricinfo. Retrieved 5 December 2011
  21. ^ 2006/07 Faithwear Inter-Provincial One-Day Series BRMTaylor. Retrieved 29 January 2012
  22. ^ 2007/08 Faithwear Inter-Provincial One-Day Series BRMTaylor. Retrieved 3 February 2012
  23. ^ From riches to rags Cricinfo. Retrieved 4 December 2011
  24. ^ 2008/09 Faithwear Inter-Provincial One-Day Series BRMTaylor. Retrieved 13 February 2012
  25. ^ Mashonaland Eagles vs Mountaineers at Harare Sports Club Cricinfo. Retrieved 10 November 2011
  26. ^ Points Table Cricinfo. Retrieved 30 November 2011
  27. ^ Rhinos secure place in final Cricinfo. Retrieved 11 October 2011
  28. ^ Mountaineers thrash Rocks to enter final Cricinfo. Retrieved 12 October 2011
  29. ^ Mountaineers lower order secures trophy Cricinfo. Retrieved 13 October 2011
  30. ^ "Faithwear Metbank One-Day Competition 2009/10 Table". CricketArchive. Retrieved 2010-11-23. 
  31. ^ Faithwear Metbank One-Day Competition Most Runs Cricinfo. Retrieved 18 November 2011
  32. ^ Faithwear Metbank One-Day Competition Most Wickets Cricinfo. Retrieved 19 November 2011
  33. ^ Southern Rocks cruise to Pro40 title Cricinfo. Retrieved 20 November 2011
  34. ^ Southern Rocks Squad - Zimbabwe Domestic Season 2010/12 Cricinfo. Retrieved 22 November 2011
  35. ^ 2010/11 Metbank Pro40 Championship Points Table CricketArchive. Retrieved 4 December 2011
  36. ^ Brian Vitori leads Rocks into finals with easy win Cricinfo. Retrieved 26 November 2011
  37. ^ Cremer spins Rhinos into finals Cricinfo. Retrieved 28 November 2011
  38. ^ Mid West Rhinos vs Southern Rocks at Harare Final Match Scorecard Cricinfo. Retrieved 29 November 2011
  39. ^ Metbank Pro40 Championship Most Runs Cricinfo. Retrieved 30 November 2011
  40. ^ Metbank Pro40 Championship Most Wickets Cricinfo. Retrieved 1 December 2011
  41. ^ "Metbank Pro40 Championship Points Table". Cricinfo. Retrieved 2011-12-06. 
  42. ^ allAfrica.com: Zimbabwe: It's Twenty20 Magi allAfrica. Retrieved 30 November 2011
  43. ^ Points Table Cricinfo. Retrieved 14 December 2011
  44. ^ Coca-Cola Pro50 Championship Most Runs Cricinfo. Retrieved 18 December 2011
  45. ^ Coca-Cola Pro50 Championship Most Wickets Cricinfo. Retrieved 19 December 2011
  46. ^ "Coca-Cola Pro50 Championship Points Table". Cricinfo. Retrieved 2011-12-30. 
  47. ^ Tatenda Taibu, Stuart Matsikenyeri hundreds light up Pro50 Championship Cricinfo. Retrieved 15 January 2012
  48. ^ Zimbabwe Cricket Sponsors Zimbabwe Cricket Official Website. Retrieved 2 December 2011

External links[edit]