Cockburn Island (Antarctica)

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Cockburn Island
Geography
Location Antarctica
Coordinates 64°12′S 56°51′W / 64.200°S 56.850°W / -64.200; -56.850
Length 2.7 km (1.68 mi)
Width 2.0 km (1.24 mi)
Highest elevation 450 m (1,480 ft)
Country
Demographics
Population 0
Additional information
Administered under the Antarctic Treaty System

Cockburn Island is an oval island 2.7 kilometres (1.7 mi) long, consisting of a high plateau with steep slopes surmounted on the northwest side by a pyramidal peak 450 m (1,476 ft) high, lying in the north-east entrance to Admiralty Sound, south of the north-east end of Antarctic Peninsula. It was discovered by a British expedition under Ross, 1839-43, who named it for Admiral George Cockburn, Royal Navy, then senior Lord of the Admiralty.

Geology[edit]

Geologically, the area makes up the Cockburn Island Formation, which was studied extensively in the late 1990s by H. A. Jonkers.[1] Rocks found on the island are volcanic,[2] and the island is characterized by its "precipitous cliffs".[3] A "Pecten conglomerate" from the late Pliocene or early Pleistocene period has been identified on the island, situated on a wave-cut platform at 720-820 ft.[4]

Wildlife[edit]

The island has been identified as an Important Bird Area (IBA) by BirdLife International because it supports a breeding colony of about 800 pairs of Imperial Shags. Although a large colony of Adélie Penguins and Snow Petrel nests were reported from the island in 1901, it is not known whether they continue to breed there.[5] J.D. Hooker made a series of botanical collections on the island in 1843.[6]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Francis, Jane E.; Pirrie, Duncan; Crame, J. Alistair (1 January 2006). Cretaceous-tertiary High-latitude Palaeoenvironments: James Ross Basin, Antarctica. Geological Society of London. p. 79. ISBN 978-1-86239-197-0. 
  2. ^ Hooker, Sir Joseph Dalton (1847). Botany of the Antarctic voyage of H. M. discovery ships, Erebus and Terror: under the command of Captain Sir J.C. Ross, 1839-43. p. 535. 
  3. ^ Zalasiewicz, Jan; Williams, Mark (22 March 2012). The Goldilocks Planet: The 4 billion year story of Earth's climate. Oxford University Press. p. 147. ISBN 978-0-19-163402-4. 
  4. ^ Richards, Horace (December 2007). Annotated Bibliography of Quaternary Shorelines: Supplement 1965-1969. Academy of Natural Sciences. p. 225. ISBN 978-1-4223-1779-2. 
  5. ^ "Cockburn Island". BirdLife data zone: Important Bird Areas. BirdLife International. 2012. Retrieved 2012-12-14. 
  6. ^ Putzke, Jair; Pereira, Antônio Batista (2001). The Antarctic Mosses: With Special Reference to the South Shetland Islands. Editora da ULBRA. p. 23. ISBN 978-85-7528-008-9. 

External links[edit]


Coordinates: 64°12′S 56°51′W / 64.200°S 56.850°W / -64.200; -56.850