Cockrell Hill, Texas

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City of Cockrell Hill, Texas
City
Location of Cockrell Hill in Dallas County, Texas
Location of Cockrell Hill in Dallas County, Texas
Coordinates: 32°44′19″N 96°53′21″W / 32.73861°N 96.88917°W / 32.73861; -96.88917Coordinates: 32°44′19″N 96°53′21″W / 32.73861°N 96.88917°W / 32.73861; -96.88917
Country United States
State Texas
County Dallas
Government
 • Mayor Luis D. Carrera
Area
 • Total 0.6 sq mi (1.5 km2)
 • Land 0.6 sq mi (1.5 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation 640 ft (195 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 4,193
 • Density 7,000/sq mi (2,800/km2)
Time zone CST (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 75211[1]
Area code(s) 214
FIPS code 48-15796[2]
GNIS feature ID 1333053[3]
Website http://cockrell-hill.tx.us/
Jefferson Boulevard, the main commercial street in Cockrell Hill

Cockrell Hill is a city in Dallas County, Texas, United States. The population was 4,193 at the 2010 census.[4] It is completely surrounded by the city of Dallas.

Geography[edit]

Cockrell Hill is located at 32°44′19″N 96°53′21″W / 32.73861°N 96.88917°W / 32.73861; -96.88917 (32.738731, -96.889181).[5]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 0.6 square miles (1.6 km2), all of it land.

History[edit]

Cockrell Hill was established by the pioneer Brentwood Allen Cockrell and his son, Woodrow. They established the town as a way of making a living, and ran it like a business, a tradition which continues today, and is evident in the style of governance in the immediate region. A statue of "Ol' Brent" stands in the city hall rotunda and the "Festival of Brent" is held each year to commemorate the founding. The Cockrell place was known to travelers on the stage line that ran from Dallas to Fort Belknap and on to El Paso and the west. The settlement developed as an agricultural crossroads and by the late 1800s had a few scattered homes, a small store, and a school. Water became the overriding issue for the town's continued growth. Frank Jester, a local developer, laid out the plan for the modern community of Cockrell Hill in 1911. A first attempt at incorporation in 1925 proved unsuccessful, and the following year a vote to disincorporate was approved. The second incorporation passed on July 21, 1937, when the population was 459. The town grew to a population of 1,246 in 1941. Many of the new residents worked in war-related industries located in the surrounding areas. In 1952 the population was 2,194, in 1990 it was 3,916, and in 2000 it was 4,445.In May 2006, Councilman Luis D. Carrera defeated C. P. Slayton and John Mendiola defeated Richard Hall and joined Silvia Ulloa, Richard Perez and Sammy Rodriquez to become the first all-Hispanic City Council in North Texas.

Demographics[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2000, there were 4,443 people, 1,150 households, and 959 families residing in the city. The population density was 7,664.7 people per square mile (2,957.7/km²). There were 1,205 housing units at an average density of 2,078.8 per square mile (802.2/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 44.63% White, 1.67% African American, 1.04% Native American, 0.23% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 49.65% from other races, and 2.77% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 84.15% of the population.

A residential area in Cockrell Hill (corner of Penrod Ave. and Ogden Ave.)

There were 1,150 households out of which 54.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.4% were married couples living together, 15.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 16.6% were non-families. 12.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.86 and the average family size was 4.18.

In the city the population was spread out with 36.6% under the age of 18, 13.8% from 18 to 24, 30.7% from 25 to 44, 13.1% from 45 to 64, and 5.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 25 years. For every 100 females there were 104.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 104.9 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $32,644, and the median income for a family was $34,722. Males had a median income of $25,632 versus $18,854 for females. The per capita income for the city was $10,083. About 17.1% of families and 17.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 22.2% of those under age 18 and 4.5% of those age 65 or over.

Education[edit]

Primary and secondary schools[edit]

Dallas Independent School District serves students in Cockrell Hill.[6] All of the schools serving Cockrell Hill are in the City of Dallas.

As of 2011, a portion is zoned to Celestino M. Soto, Jr. Elementary School,[7] Stockard Middle School,[8] and Moisés E. Molina High School.[9] Parts of southern Cockrell Hill are served by L. O. Donald Elementary School,[10] T. W. Browne Middle School,[11] and Kimball High School.[12] Parts of northern Cockrell Hill are served by Anson Jones Elementary School,[13] Quintanilla Middle School,[14] and Sunset High School.[15]

Prior to May 2006 the attendance zones differed. Mary McLeod Bethune Elementary School,[16] Browne,[17] and Molina served one section.[18] Jones,[19] Quintanilla,[20] and Molina served another section.[18] Another part was served by Donald,[21] Stockard,[22] and Kimball.[23] In 2006 Soto Elementary School opened,[24] and the attendance boundaries shifted.[25][26][27][28][29][30][31][32]

Community colleges[edit]

Dallas County Community College District operates Mountain View College, located near Cockrell Hill in Dallas.

Transportation[edit]

Cockrell Hill Transfer Location

Cockrell Hill can be reached by several bus lines in the Dallas Area Rapid Transit system. The main bus stop is the Cockrell Hill Transfer Location.

Public safety[edit]

Law enforcement is carried out by the Cockrell Hill Police Department, which employs paid and reserve sworn police officers. The current (2014) police chief is Stephen Barlag.

The Cockrell Hill Police Department has suffered one line of duty death. On May 30, 1999, Police Officer Tiffany Hickey died six days after she sustained injuries in a motor vehicle collision during pursuit of a suspect. Officer Hickey was the passenger in the patrol car, being driven by her field training officer (FTO), when they attempted to stop a vehicle for speeding and running a red light. Officer Hickey radioed dispatch to notify them of the chase but, due to an antiquated radio system, dispatch never heard the call because another officer was transmitting. Approximately three minutes later the FTO swerved to avoid another vehicle in an intersection and struck a light pole. Officer Hickey remained in serious condition before succumbing to her injuries. Officer Hickey had served with the agency for only 1 month.[33]

Fire safety is regulated by the all-volunteer Cockrell Hill Fire Department, which contracts its emergency ambulance services to the Dallas Fire Department.

Endnotes[edit]

  1. ^ This ZIP code is not exclusive to Cockrell Hill, but also serves portions of Dallas.
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  3. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  4. ^ "Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (DP-1): Cockrell Hill city, Texas". U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Retrieved January 11, 2012. 
  5. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  6. ^ "Cockrell Hill city." United States Census Bureau. Retrieved on April 20, 2009.
  7. ^ "Fall 2011 Celestino M. Soto, Jr. Elementary Attendance Zone Grades PK-6." Dallas Independent School District. Retrieved on September 8, 2011.
  8. ^ "Fall 2011 L. V. Stockard Middle School Attendance Zone Grades 7-8." Dallas Independent School District. September 8, 2011.
  9. ^ "Fall 2011 Moisés E. Molina High School Attendance Zone Grades 9-12." Dallas Independent School District. Retrieved on September 7, 2011.
  10. ^ "Fall 2011 L. O. Donald Elementary Attendance Zone Grades PK-6." Dallas Independent School District. Retrieved on September 8, 2011.
  11. ^ "Fall 2011 T. W. Browne Middle School Attendance Zone Grades 7-8." Dallas Independent School District. Retrieved on September 8, 2011.
  12. ^ "Fall 2011 Justin F. Kimball High School Attendance Zone Grades 9-12." Dallas Independent School District. Retrieved on September 8, 2011.
  13. ^ "Fall 2011 Anson Jones Elementary Attendance Zone Grades PK-6." Dallas Independent School District. Retrieved on September 7, 2011.
  14. ^ "Fall 2009 Attendance Zone Grades 7-8 Raúl Quintanilla, Sr. Middle School." Dallas Independent School District. Retrieved on September 8, 2011.
  15. ^ "Fall 2011 Sunset High School Attendance Zone Grades 9-12." Dallas Independent School District. Retrieved on September 8, 2011.
  16. ^ "Mary McLeod Bethune Elementary Attendance Zone" (2005). Dallas Independent School District. Retrieved on April 20, 2009.
  17. ^ "T. W. Browne Middle School Attendance Zone" (2005). Dallas Independent School District. Retrieved on April 20, 2009.
  18. ^ a b "Moisés E. Molina High School Attendance Zone" (2005). Dallas Independent School District. Retrieved on April 20, 2009.
  19. ^ "Anson Jones Elementary School Attendance Zone" (2005). Dallas Independent School District. Retrieved on April 20, 2009.
  20. ^ "Quintanilla Middle School Attendance Zone" (2005). Dallas Independent School District. Retrieved on April 20, 2009.
  21. ^ "L. O. Donald Elementary Attendance Zone" (2005). Dallas Independent School District. Retrieved on April 20, 2009.
  22. ^ "L. V. Stockard Middle School Attendance Zone (2005). Dallas Independent School District. Retrieved on April 20, 2009.
  23. ^ "Justin F. Kimball High School Attendance Zone (2005). Dallas Independent School District. Retrieved on April 20, 2009.
  24. ^ "http://www.dallasisd.org/cms/lib/TX01001475/Centricity/Domain/89/schoolinfo/eszones2006/SotoCelestino2006.pdf Fall 2006 Celestino M. Soto, Jr. Elementary (PK-6) Attendance Zone]." Dallas Independent School District. Retrieved on April 20, 2009.
  25. ^ "Fall 2006 L. O. Donald Elementary (PK-6) Attendance Zone." Dallas Independent School District. Retrieved on April 20, 2009.
  26. ^ "Fall 2006 Anson Jones Elementary (PK-6) Attendance Zone." Dallas Independent School District. Retrieved on April 20, 2009.
  27. ^ "Fall 2006 T. W. Browne Middle School (7-8) Attendance Zone." Dallas Independent School District. Retrieved on April 20, 2009.
  28. ^ "Fall 2006 Stockard Middle School (7-8) Attendance Zone." Dallas Independent School District. Retrieved on April 20, 2009.
  29. ^ "Fall 2006 Raúl Quintanilla, Sr. Middle School (7-8) Attendance Zone." Dallas Independent School District. Retrieved on April 20, 2009.
  30. ^ "Fall 2006 Moisés E. Molina High School (9-12) Attendance Zone." Dallas Independent School District. Retrieved on April 20, 2009.
  31. ^ "Fall 2006 Justin F. Kimball High School (9-12) Attendance Zone." Dallas Independent School District. Retrieved on April 20, 2009.
  32. ^ "Fall 2006 Sunset High School (9-12) Attendance Zone." Dallas Independent School District. Retrieved on April 20, 2009.
  33. ^ "Police Officer Tiffany Catherine Hickey," Officer Down Memorial Page. Retrieved on September 6, 2011.

References[edit]

External links[edit]