Chocolate liquor

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Chocolate liquor
Chocolateliquor.jpg
A chocolate mill (right) grinds and heats cacao beans into chocolate liquor. A melanger (left) mixes milk, sugar, and other ingredients into the liquor.
Alternative names Cocoa liquor
Type Chocolate
Main ingredients Cocoa beans
Cookbook:Chocolate liquor  Chocolate liquor
Not to be confused with Chocolate liqueur.

Chocolate liquor (cocoa liquor) is pure cocoa mass in liquid form. Like the cocoa beans (nibs) from which it is produced, it contains both cocoa solids and cocoa butter in roughly equal proportion.[1]

It is produced from cocoa beans that have been fermented, dried, roasted, and separated from their skins. The beans are ground into cocoa mass (cocoa paste). The mass is melted to become the liquor, and the liquor is cooled and molded into blocks known as unsweetened baking chocolate (bitter chocolate).

Chocolate liquor contains roughly 53 percent cocoa butter (fat), about 17 percent carbohydrates, 11 percent protein, 6 percent tannins, and 1.5 percent theobromine.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Stevens, Molly. "Sorting Out Chocolate - Fine Cooking Recipes, Techniques and Tips". Taunton.com. Retrieved 2011-11-13. 
  2. ^ Wolke, Robert L. (2005). What Einstein Told His Cook 2, The Sequel: Further Adventures in Kitchen Science (Hardcover). New York: W. W. Norton & Company. p. 433. ISBN 0-393-05869-7. [1]