Codex Colbertinus

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Codex Colbertinus, designated by 6 or c, is a Latin manuscript of the Bible. Its version of the four Gospels and Book of Acts follows the Vetus Latina, while the rest of the New Testament follows the Vulgate. It was written in the 11th or 12th century, probably in southern France.[1]

The Latin text of the codex represents a mixed form of text. It is generally a European Old Latin text, named Itala, strongly interpolated by Arfa. Both text were contaminated by Jerome's Vulgate.[1]

It contains the only complete exemplar of the Vetus Latina version of 1 Esdras.[2]

Two robbers who were crucified on either side of Jesus are named, in Matthew 27:38, as Zoatham (right-hand) and Camma (left-hand), in Mark 15:27, as Zoatham and Chammatha.[3]

The text of the codex was edited by Belsheim in 1888, Vogels in 1953, and by Jülicher.[4]

Currently the manuscript is housed at the National Library of France (Lat. 254) at Paris.[1]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Bruce M. Metzger, Bart D. Ehrman, The Text of the New Testament: Its Transmission, Corruption and Restoration, Oxford University Press (New York - Oxford, 2005), p. 103.
  2. ^ The Latin Versions of First Esdras, Harry Clinton York, The American Journal of Semitic Languages and Literatures, Vol. 26, No. 4 (Jul., 1910), pp. 253-302
  3. ^ Bruce M. Metzger, Bart D. Ehrman, "The Text of the New Testament: Its Transmission, Corruption and Restoration", Oxford University Press (New York - Oxford, 2005), p. 270.
  4. ^ Bruce M. Metzger, The Early Versions of the New Testament, Oxford University Press 1977, p. 296.

See also[edit]