Colin Brown (RAF officer)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Colin Peter Brown
Born 20 December 1898
Langside, Glasgow, Scotland
Died 19 October 1965 (aged 66)
Allegiance  United Kingdom
Service/branch Aviation
Years of service 1917 - 1954
Rank Air Vice Marshal
Unit Seaplane Defence Flight/No. 13 Squadron RNAS/No. 213 Squadron RAF, No. 205 Squadron RAF, No. 3 Squadron RAF, No. 420 Flight RAF, No. 13 Squadron RAF, No. 22 Group RAF
Commands held No. 26 Squadron RAF
Awards Order of the Bath, Order of the British Empire, Distinguished Flying Cross with Bar
Other work Retired as Air Vice Marshal

Air Vice Marshal Colin Peter Brown began his military career as a flying ace in the Royal Naval Air Service during World War I, being credited with 14 aerial victories. He remained in the RAF postwar and served until invalided from the service on 15 March 1954.[1]

Colin Brown was educated at Dulwich College. He then joined the RNAS in June 1917,[2] being commissioned a Flight Sub-Lieutenant on the 13th.[3] He became noted for his willingness to fight, as he attacked land and sea targets as well as enemy aircraft. He even went so far as to strafe Zeebrugge Harbor in a night attack. He scored his first aerial victory on 13 November 1917, using a Sopwith Camel. There was a five-month lapse, but when he started scoring again on 27 April 1918, he accrued victories steadily until his climactic solo destruction of three Fokker D.VIIs on 4 October 1918. In summary, he destroyed eight enemy planes and drove down six out of control in 374 flying hours. Eleven of his wins were over first-rate German fighter planes, Albatros D.Vs and Fokker D.VIIs. In two of his three victories over observation planes, he was teaming with other pilots, such as future admiral David Ingalls.[4]

In the midst of his winning streak, he was promoted to Lieutenant on 1 April 1918, then appointed a Flight Commander with the rank of Captain later in 1918. He chose to remain in the RAF at war's end.[5]

Postwar career[edit]

Colin Brown rose through the operational side of the RAF to become a staff officer; he was not assigned to command positions after ca 1937.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.rafweb.org/Biographies/Brown_CP.htm Retrieved on 6 June 2010.
  2. ^ Above the Trenches: A Complete Record of the Fighter Aces and Units of the British Empire Air Forces 1915-1920. p. 89. 
  3. ^ http://www.rafweb.org/Biographies/Brown_CP.htm Retrieved on 6 June 2010.
  4. ^ Above the Trenches: A Complete Record of the Fighter Aces and Units of the British Empire Air Forces 1915-1920. p. 89. 
  5. ^ http://www.rafweb.org/Biographies/Brown_CP.htm Retrieved on 6 June 2010.
  6. ^ http://www.rafweb.org/Biographies/Brown_CP.htm Retrieved on 6 June 2010.
  • Above the Trenches: A Complete Record of the Fighter Aces and Units of the British Empire Air Forces 1915-1920 Christopher F. Shores, Norman L. R. Franks, Russell Guest. Grub Street, 1990. ISBN 0-948817-19-4, ISBN 978-0-948817-19-9.