Qullasuyu

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Wiphala of the Qullasuyu

Qullasuyu (Aymara: Qullasuyu About this sound listen  and Quechua, qulla south, Qulla a people, suyu region, part of a territory, each of the four regions which formed the Inca Empire,[1] "southern region", hispanicized spellings Collasuyu, Kholla Suyu) was the southeastern provincial region of the Inca Empire. Qullasuyu is the region of the Qulla and related specifically to the native Qulla Quechuas who primarily resided in areas such as Cochabamba and Potosi. Most Aymara territories which are now largely incorporated into the modern South American states of northern Chile, Argentina, Peru and Bolivia which was annexed during the reign of Sapa Inca Huayna Cápac in the sixteenth century.

Overview[edit]

Recently, there have been movements to form a "Greater Qullasuyu" (or Qullana Suyu Marka) which would incorporate a territory similar to the former Tawantinsuyu in extent. This ideal has been proposed by the office of the Apu Mallku and the parliament of the Qullana. Qullasuyu was the largest of the four suyu (or "quarters", the largest divisions of the Inca empire) in terms of area. This suyu encompassed the Bolivian Altiplano and much of the southern Andes, running down into Argentina and as far south as the Maule river near modern Santiago, Chile.[2] Along with Kuntisuyu, it was part of the Hurin Suyukuna or "Lower Quarters" of the empire.[3][4]

Wamani[edit]

The four suyus of the Inca empire. Qullasuyu appears in blue.

Each suyu was divided into wamani, or provinces. Qullasuyu included the wamani of:

  • Arica or Arika
  • Cana or Kana
  • Canche or Kanche
  • Caranga or Karanka
  • Caruma
  • Cavina or Kawina, whose people were “Incas by privilege”
  • Chicha
  • Cochabamba or Quchapampa
  • Collagua
  • Lipe
  • Locumba
  • Lupaqa
  • Moquegua
  • Pacajes or Pacasa
  • Qolla Urcosuyu or Qulla Urqusuyu
  • Sama
  • Tambo or Tampu
  • Tarata
  • Ubina
  • Yampará or Yampara

[5][6]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Teofilo Laime Ajacopa, Diccionario Bilingüe Iskay simipi yuyayk'ancha, La Paz, 2007 (Quechua-Spanish dictionary)
  2. ^ D’Altroy, Terence N. (2005). The Incas. Blackwell Publishing: Malden, p. 86-87
  3. ^ D’Altroy, Terence N. (2005). The Incas. Blackwell Publishing: Malden, p. 42-43, 86-89
  4. ^ Steward, Julian H. & Faron, Louis, C. (1959). Native Peoples of South America. McGraw-Hill: New York, p. 185-192
  5. ^ D’Altroy, Terence N. (2005). The Incas. Blackwell Publishing: Malden, p. 42-43, 86-89
  6. ^ Steward, Julian H. & Faron, Louis, C. (1959). Native Peoples of South America. McGraw-Hill: New York, p. 185-192