Campus

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For other uses, see Campus (disambiguation).
Joseph Jacques Ramée's original plan for Union College in Schenectady, New York, the first comprehensively planned campus in the United States[1]

A campus is traditionally the land on which a college or university and related institutional buildings are situated. A modern campus is a collection of buildings that belong to a given institution, either academic or non-academic. Usually a campus includes libraries, lecture halls, residence halls, student centers or dining halls, and park-like settings.

Etymology[edit]

The word derives from a Latin word for "field" and was first used to describe the grounds of a college at the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University) during the 18th century.[2] Some other American colleges later adopted the word to describe individual fields at their own institutions, but "campus" did not yet describe the whole university property. A school might have one space called a campus, one called a field, and another called a yard.

History[edit]

The tradition of a campus did not start in America, but with the medieval European universities where the students and teachers lived and worked together in a cloistered environment.[3] It was the notion of the importance of the setting to academic life that migrated to America, and early colonial educational institutions were based on the Scottish and English collegiate system.[3]

Uses[edit]

The meaning expanded to include the whole institutional property during the 20th century, with the old meaning persisting into the 1950s in some places.

Office buildings[edit]

Sometimes the lands on which company office buildings sit, along with the buildings, are called campuses. The Microsoft Campus in Redmond, Washington is a good example. Hospitals, and even airports sometimes use the term to describe the territory of their facilities.

Universities[edit]

The word "campus" has also been applied to European universities, although most such institutions are characterized by ownership of individual buildings in urban settings rather than park-like lawns in which buildings are placed.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Turner, Paul V. (1996). Joseph Ramée: International Architect of the Revolutionary Era. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. p. 190. 
  2. ^ Harper, Douglas. "Campus (n.)". Online Etymology Dictionary. Retrieved 20 December 2013. 
  3. ^ a b Chapman, M. Perry (2006). American Places: In Search of the Twenty-first Century Campus. Greenwood Publishing Group. p. 7. 

See also[edit]