O2 World (Hamburg)

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O2 World Hamburg
O2 World Logo.svg
RK 1009 9830 O2World Hamburg.jpg
Former names Color Line Arena (2002 - 2010)
Location Sylvesterallee 10
22525 Hamburg, Germany
Coordinates 53°35′21″N 9°53′57″E / 53.58917°N 9.89917°E / 53.58917; 9.89917Coordinates: 53°35′21″N 9°53′57″E / 53.58917°N 9.89917°E / 53.58917; 9.89917
Public transit Hamburg S3.svgHamburg S21.svg Stellingen
Owner Anschutz Entertainment Group
Capacity 16,000 (concerts)
13,800 (handball)
12,947 (ice hockey)
Scoreboard Yes
Construction
Broke ground June 13, 2001
Opened November 8, 2002
Construction cost 83 million
Tenants
Hamburg Freezers (DEL) (2002-present)
HSV Hamburg (HBL) (2002-present)
Inside of the arena

O2 World Hamburg (stylised as O2 World Hamburg and originally Color Line Arena)[1] is a multi-purpose arena in Hamburg, Germany. It opened in 2002 and can hold up to 16,000 people. It is located at Altona Volkspark, adjacent to the football stadium Imtech Arena and the new Volksbank Arena in Hamburg's western Bahrenfeld district.

O2 World Hamburg is primarily used for handball and ice hockey, and is the home of HSV Hamburg and the Hamburg Freezers. The maximum capacity of the Hall is 16,000 visitors at sporting events by eliminating the Interior places 12.947. It is among the most modern arenas in Europe.

History[edit]

The arena opened in November 2002, Halle is 150 meters long and 110 metres wide and has an elevation of 33 metres. Construction costs totaled approximately 83 million Euro. The construction of the stadium was funded by the Finnish entrepreneur Harry Harkimo and between the city of Hamburg, the Harkimo the land for a symbolic price of a Mark sold and run infrastructure improvements as a preparatory action for 12 million German marks (about 6.1 million euros). In October 2007, the Hall for estimated 75 million euros was sold Anschutz Entertainment Group to that. The construction of the arena, which took place from June 2001 to November 2002, cost €83 million (ca. US$121.5mn).

Recent timeline[edit]

External links[edit]

References[edit]