Colorado State Highway 7

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"CO 7" redirects here. For the congressional district, see Colorado's 7th congressional district.

State Highway 7 marker

State Highway 7
Route information
Maintained by CDOT
Length: 81.64 mi[1] (131.39 km)
Major junctions
West end: US 36.svg US 36 in Estes Park
East end: I-76.svg I-76 in Brighton
Location
Counties: Larimer, Boulder, Weld (south boundary), Broomfield, Adams
Highway system

Colorado State Highways

US 6 SH 8
State Highway 7 in South St. Vrain Canyon near Lyons.

State Highway 7 in the U.S. state of Colorado is a state highway. Approximately 83 miles (134 km) long, it is located in the north-central portion of the state, traversing the mountains on the east of the continental divide south of Estes Park as well as portions of the Colorado Piedmont north of Denver. The northwestern segment of the highway is part of the Peak-to-Peak Scenic Byway and furnishes an access route to Estes Park, Colorado and Rocky Mountain National Park. In its southeast portion it skirts the northern end of the Denver Metropolitan Area, providing an access route connecting Boulder, Lafayette and Brighton with Interstate 25 and Interstate 76.

The western terminus is at the junction of U.S. Highway 36 at N. St. Vrain and S. St. Vrain avenues in Estes Park. The eastern terminus is at Interstate 76 exit 25 in Brighton. The portion between Lyons and Boulder, where it is concurrent with US 36, is unsigned. The highway is two lanes along the entire route except for portions in the cities and towns.

Route description[edit]

From Estes Park, Route 7 climbs into the mountains of southwest Larimer County and skirts the east side of Rocky Mountain National Park, providing the closest vehicle approach to the popular trailhead to the summit of Longs Peak. Near the community of Raymond it intersects State Highway 72, which takes the Peak-to-Peak Scenic Byway designation with it to the south, while Route 7 turns to the east and follows South St. Vrain Creek downstream onto the piedmont at Lyons, where it intersects U.S. Highway 36. South of Lyons it is concurrent with U.S. 36 along the base of the foothills to Boulder. (This section is signed only as U.S. 36.) It is also concurrent with State Highway 119 on 28th Street within Boulder. It runs straight east from Boulder as the extension of Arapahoe Avenue to U.S. Highway 287 north of Lafayette, jogging one mile (1.6 km) to the south while concurrent with U.S. 287, then going due east again, as Baseline Road, to Interstate 25. East of I-25 it jogs one mile (1.6 km) south, then due east as 160th Avenue (part of the Greater Denver street numbering system) through Brighton to Interstate 76 in the eastern part of Brighton.

History[edit]

The route was established in the 1920s. It began at Estes Park and traveled south to Lyons south to Boulder. It then continued to its terminus at U.S. Highway 87 in Lafayette. The route was paved from Boulder to Lafayette in 1932 and from Estes Park to Lyons in 1936. In 1939, the route was extended southward to Brighton, where it met U.S. Highway 6; this extension was paved by 1946. In 2006, the section on Broadway between US 36 and Canyon Boulevard in Boulder was turned back to the City of Boulder, and Route 7 was rerouted to be concurrent (unsigned) with US 36 on 28th Street through Boulder.[2]

Major intersections[edit]

County Location Mile Destination Notes
Larimer Estes Park 0.000 US 36 Start of route
Boulder Alenspark 14.910 SH 7 Bus. Loop
16.080 SH 7 Bus. Loop
19.24 SH 72
Lyons 32.99 US 36 Begin US 36 concurrency
Boulder 50.89 SH 119 Begin SH 119 concurrency
52.29 SH 119 End SH 119 concurrency
52.48 US 36 End US 36 concurrency
53.45 SH 157 Foothills Parkway
Lafayette 59.29 SH 42
60.68 US 287 Begin US 287 concurrency
61.87 US 287 End US 287 concurrency
Broomfield 68.38 I‑25 / US 87
Adams Brighton 76.98 US 85
77.29 SH 2
81.64 I‑76 / US 6 End of route
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Segment list for SH 7". Retrieved 2007-05-12. 
  2. ^ Salek, Matthew E. "Colorado Routes 1-19". Retrieved 2010-05-17.