Come On Over Tour

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Come On Over Tour
St cootposter.jpeg
Promotional poster for 1998 tour
World tour by Shania Twain
Location Australia, Europe, North America
Associated album Come On Over
Start date May 29, 1998 (1998-05-29)
End date December 5, 1999 (1999-12-05)
Legs 5
Shows 7 in Australia
4 in Europe
153 in North America
165 Total
Shania Twain concert chronology
Come On Over Tour
(1998–99)
Up! Tour
(2003–04)

The Come On Over Tour was the debut concert tour by Canadian singer-songwriter Shania Twain. Visiting North America, Australia and Europe, the tour supported Twain's third studio album Come On Over.[1] Deemed one of the most anticipated tours of the 90s, the trek became one of the highest grossing tours in both 1998 and 1999, along with becoming one of the biggest tours by a female musician of any genre.[2][3] The tour was seen by over two million spectators and earned over 80 million dollars.[4][5] Additional accolades include being named the "Country Tour of the Year" in 1998 and 1999 by Pollstar Concert Industry Awards.[6][7] Supporting Twain on the tour was family band Leahy and country artist Shane Minor. The tour was sponsored by Gitano Jeans.

Background[edit]

The tour was announced by various media outlets in March 1998, when Twain's third album was certified five times platinum in the United States. The tour, named after the same album, was planned to begin in May 1998 in Sudbury (near Twain's hometown of Timmins) and ending December 1998 in Phoenix, Arizona.[8] It became very popular, with many dates selling out within hours of the announcement. Most notably, the concerts at the Pine Knob Music Theatre in Clarkston, Michigan sold out in 29 minutes, a feat previously conquered by Metallica and The Who.[9] The response led Twain to add additional dates in North America along with dates in Australia and the United Kingdom.

To introduce the tour, Twain narrated:[10]

"It's going to be a big party that I happen to be hosting. Pretty high energy for most of the time. I ['ll] get out on tour, I’ll be able to do a full show of original songs that people will be familiar with. It’s going to be ideal, almost like I couldn’t have planned it better, even though I didn’t really plan it at all. I am glad I waited, and I’m going to give it all I’ve got to make it everything the fans have been waiting for."

By 1998, Twain was an established country music sensation, selling over ten million albums, with her latest album selling over five million in the United States. Rumors began circulating within the media concerning Twain's vocal ability. Many critics saw Twain as a "studio voice", doubting her ability to sing live. The success of Come On Over prompted Twain to tour. Twain dismissed rumors stating at that time, she would rather focus on producing her next album than touring. She responded, "You have a huge record, you do a huge tour, you come home exhausted and you somehow have to turn out another record, fast, that everyone will compare to the first one. It was a very good decision not to tour in '95 [...] If I had toured then, [the tour] this year would not have been nearly as exciting."[11] She further asserted she wanted to tour in 95 but wanted the anticipation of a tour to build amongst her fan base. She further states she was very confident as a live performer, dismissing critics who felt Twain couldn't translate her success to the stage. Twain says she was proud to have her album, The Woman in Me, sell so well without a supporting tour. "It didn't make sense financially of course. I could have capitalized. But my intentions were to have a longer career than just that year."

Rehearsals began in May 1998 at the Olympic Center in Lake Placid, New York. Twain says she was shocked to hear of the success of the tour, believing she would only sellout floor seats in the arenas and amphitheaters where the concerts were performed. She would later comment on how comfortable she felt with touring compared to her early days of success as a nightclub performer in Ontario. Twain recalls traveling in busted vans, hauling her own equipment and the minimal wages she received during that time. However, she states she was very young and saw it as an opportunity to have fun.[12] To help promote the tour, Twain held radio contests in the markets where she would perform. The winner would appear on stage with Twain to perform her first single, "What Made You Say That", with the band, while Twain performed the backing vocals. On March 18, 1999, at the Corel Centre in Ottawa, an unknown Avril Lavigne performed on stage with Twain and was later signed to Arista Records the following year.[13] For a similar contest, Twain chose nine singers and fours drummers from Shaker Heights High School to perform onstage with her at Blossom Music Center in Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio.[14]

On its premiere concert, Twain became emotional after performing "From This Moment On". After composing herself, she told the audience about the death of her parents and explained how it motivated her to have the life she's able to live now. She continued her story stating the last performance her parents saw of her was when she opened for Bernadette Peters and the Toronto Symphony Orchestra at the Roy Thomson Hall on February 8, 1987.[15] While on the road, Twain received additional recognition, earning two Grammy Awards, diamond certification on both The Woman in Me and Come On Over and she appeared on VH1 Divas alongside Celine Dion, Gloria Estefan, Mariah Carey and Aretha Franklin. Furthermore, Twain participated in a benefit concert for Amnesty International in Paris, France at the Palais Omnisports de Paris-Bercy. She performed with Bruce Springsteen, Peter Gabriel, Alanis Morissette, and Radiohead.[16] To continue her philanthropy, Twain visited survivors of the Columbine High School massacre and donated the proceeds of her May 11, 1999 concert at Coors Amphitheatre to the high school.[4]

Opening acts[edit]

Set list[edit]

Band[edit]

  • Marc Muller - Pedal, Steel, Guitar
  • Randal Walker - Guitar
  • Brent Barcus - Guitar
  • Andy Cichon - Bass
  • J.D. Blaire - Drums
  • Roddy Chong - Fiddle, Guitar, Mandolin, Percussion
  • Allison Cornell - Fiddle, Keyboards, Mandolin
  • Hardy Hemphill - Keyboards, Percussion, Harmonica, Accordion
  • Cory Churko - Guitar, Fiddle

Tour dates[edit]

Date City Country Venue
North America
May 29, 1998 Sudbury Canada Sudbury Community Arena
June 3, 1998 Edmonton Edmonton Coliseum
June 4, 1998 Saskatoon Saskatchewan Place
June 6, 1998 Calgary Canadian Airlines Saddledome
June 7, 1998
June 9, 1998 Vancouver General Motors Place
June 10, 1998 Spokane United States Spokane Veterans Memorial Arena
June 13, 1998 Tacoma Tacoma Dome
June 15, 1998 Nampa Idaho Center Amphitheater
June 16, 1998 West Valley City E Center
June 18, 1998 Mountain View Shoreline Amphitheatre
June 19, 1998 Concord Concord Pavilion
June 21, 1998 Anaheim Arrowhead Pond of Anaheim
July 3, 1998[A] Milwaukee Marcus Amphitheater
July 6, 1998 Peoria Carver Arena
July 8, 1998 Louisville Freedom Hall
July 10, 1998 Columbus Polaris Amphitheater
July 11, 1998 Noblesville Deer Creek Music Center
July 14, 1998[B] Council Bluffs Westfair Amphitheater
July 15, 1998 Greenwood Village Coors Amphitheatre
July 17, 1998 Bonner Springs Sandstone Center for the Performing Arts
July 18, 1998 Maryland Heights Riverport Amphitheater
July 20, 1998 Clarkson Pine Knob Music Theatre
July 21, 1998
July 22, 1998 Grand Rapids Van Andel Arena
July 24, 1998 Minneapolis Target Center
July 25, 1998 Madison Kohl Center
August 7, 1998 Toronto Canada Molson Amphitheatre
August 8, 1998
August 10, 1998 Montreal Molson Centre
August 14, 1998 Bristow United States Nissan Pavilion at Stone Ridge
August 15, 1998 Philadelphia CoreStates Center
August 17, 1998 Albany Pepsi Arena
August 18, 1998 Mansfield Great Woods Center for the Performing Arts
August 19, 1998 Hartford Meadows Music Theater
August 21, 1998 Holmdel Township PNC Bank Arts Center
August 22, 1998 Wantagh Jones Beach Amphitheater
August 24, 1998[C] Geddes New York State Fair Grandstand
August 25, 1998 Cuyahoga Falls Blossom Music Center
August 28, 1998 Cincinnati Riverbend Music Center
August 29, 1998 Tinley Park New World Music Theater
September 9, 1998 College Station Reed Arena
September 10, 1998 Austin Frank Erwin Center
September 12, 1998 Dallas Reunion Arena
September 17, 1998 West Palm Beach Coral Sky Amphitheater
September 18, 1998 Tampa Ice Palace
September 19, 1998 Orlando Orlando Arena
September 21, 1998 Tallahassee Tallahassee-Leon County Civic Center
September 25, 1998 Nashville Nashville Arena
September 26, 1998 Atlanta Coca Cola Lakewood Amphitheater
October 11, 1998 Rapid City Rushmore Plaza Civic Center
October 12, 1998 Bismarck BCC Arena
October 15, 1998 Ames Hilton Coliseum
October 16, 1998 Rockford Rockford MetroCentre
October 17, 1998 Terre Haute Hulman Center
October 18, 1998 Evansville Roberts Municipal Stadium
October 21, 1998 Charleston Charleston Civic Center
October 22, 1998 Lexington Rupp Arena
October 24, 1998 Champaign Assembly Hall
October 25, 1998 East Lansing Breslin Student Events Center
October 27, 1998 Valley Center Brown Britt Arena
October 28, 1998 Oklahoma City Myriad Convention Center
October 30, 1998 Lafayette Cajundome
October 31, 1998 Houston Compaq Center
November 1, 1998 San Antonio Alamodome
November 5, 1998 Huntsville Von Braun Center
November 6, 1998 Chattanooga UTC Arena
November 7, 1998 Greenville BI-LO Center
November 10, 1998 Jackson Mississippi Coliseum
November 11, 1998 Little Rock Barton Coliseum
November 13, 1998 Biloxi Mississippi Coast Coliseum
November 14, 1998 Memphis Pyramid Arena
November 15, 1998 Birmingham BJCC Arena
November 17, 1998 Roanoke Roanoke Civic Center
November 18, 1998 North Charleston North Charleston Coliseum
November 20, 1998 Knoxville Thompson–Boling Arena
November 21, 1998 Chapel Hill Dean Smith Center
November 22, 1998 Charlotte Charlotte Coliseum
November 24, 1998 Hampton Hampton Coliseum
December 2, 1998 Pocatello Holt Arena
December 3, 1998 Billings MetraPark Arena
December 5, 1998 Fargo Fargodome
December 15, 1998 Buffalo Marine Midland Arena
December 16, 1998 Rochester Blue Cross Arena
December 17, 1998[D] New York City Madison Square Garden
December 19, 1998 University Park Bryce Jordan Center
December 20, 1998 Baltimore Baltimore Arena
December 30, 1998 Albuquerque Tingley Coliseum
December 31, 1998 Phoenix America West Arena
January 2, 1999 Las Vegas MGM Grand Garden Arena
January 15, 1999 Miami Bayfront Park Amphitheater
January 16, 1999
Australia
February 9, 1999 Brisbane Australia Brisbane Entertainment Centre
February 11, 1999 Newcastle Newcastle Entertainment Centre
February 12, 1999 Sydney Sydney Entertainment Centre
February 13, 1999
February 16, 1999 Adelaide Adelaide Entertainment Centre
February 17, 1999 Melbourne Rod Laver Arena
February 18, 1999
North America[19]
February 22, 1999[E] Houston United States Reliant Astrodome
March 13, 1999 Moncton Canada Moncton Coliseum
March 15, 1999 Montreal Molson Centre
March 17, 1999 Ottawa Corel Centre
March 18, 1999
March 20, 1999 Quebec City Quebec Coliseum
March 22, 1999 Hamilton Copps Coliseum
March 23, 1999 Toronto Air Canada Centre
March 26, 1999 Winnipeg Winnipeg Arena
March 26, 1999
March 29, 1999 Saskatoon Saskatchewan Place
March 30, 1999 Calgary Canadian Airlines Saddledome
March 31, 1999 Edmonton Skyreach Centre
April 2, 1999 Kamloops Riverside Coliseum
April 3, 1999 Vancouver General Motors Place
May 4, 1999 Sacramento United States ARCO Arena
May 6, 1999 Los Angeles Hollywood Bowl
May 7, 1999 Chula Vista Coors Amphitheater
May 8, 1999 San Bernardino Blockbuster Pavilion
May 11, 1999 Greenwood Village Fiddler’s Green Amphitheatre
May 14, 1999 Bonner Springs Sandstone Amphitheatre
May 15, 1999 Maryland Heights Riverport Amphitheater
May 17, 1999 Noblesville Deer Creek Music Center
May 18, 1999 Burgettstown Coca-Cola Star Lake Amphitheater Center
May 20, 1999 Chicago United Center
May 21, 1999 Columbus Polaris Amphitheater
May 22, 1999 Auburn Hills Palace of Auburn Hills
May 24, 1999 Minneapolis Target Center
May 26, 1999 Milwaukee Marcus Amphitheater
May 28, 1999 Bristow Nissan Pavilion at Stone Ridge
May 29, 1999 Philadelphia First Union Center
May 30, 1999 Hershey Hersheypark Stadium
June 1, 1999 Memphis Pyramid Arena
June 2, 1999 Nashville First American Music Center
June 4, 1999 Jacksonville Alltel Stadium
June 9, 1999 Charlotte Blockbuster Pavilion
June 11, 1999 Virginia Beach Virginia Beach Amphitheater
June 12, 1999 Raleigh Alltel Pavilion at Walnut Creek
June 14, 1999 Boston FleetCenter
June 15, 1999 New York City Madison Square Garden
June 17, 1999 Cleveland Gund Arena
June 18, 1999 Geddes New York State Fair Grandstand
June 19, 1999 Albany Pepsi Arena
June 24, 1999 Portland Rose Garden
June 25, 1999 Vancouver Canada General Motors Place
June 26, 1999 George United States Gorge Amphitheatre
July 1, 1999 Timmins Canada Hollinger Park
Europe
July 6, 1999 Glasgow Scotland Scottish Exhibition and Conference Centre
July 7, 1999 Birmingham England NEC Arena
July 8, 1999 London Wembley Arena
July 10, 1999 Dublin Ireland RDS Arena
North America[20]
November 14, 1999 Irving United States Texas Stadium
November 16, 1999 New Orleans New Orleans Arena
November 18, 1999 Atlanta Philips Arena
November 19, 1999 Birmingham BJCC Arena
November 20, 1999 Greensboro Greensboro Coliseum
November 22, 1999 Cincinnati Firstar Center
November 24, 1999 Washington, D.C. MCI Center
November 26, 1999 Trenton Sovereign Bank Arena
November 27, 1999 Hartford Hartford Civic Center
November 29, 1999 Richmond Richmond Coliseum
November 30, 1999 Greenville BI-LO Center
December 3, 1999 Orlando Orlando Arena
December 4, 1999 Tampa Ice Palace
December 5, 1999 West Palm Beach Coral Sky Amphitheater
Festivals and other miscellaneous performances
A This concert was a part of Summerfest[21]
B This concert was a part of Westfair County Fair[22]
C This concert was a part of Great New York State Fair[23]
D This concert was a part of Z-100's Annual Jingle Ball[24]
E This concert was a part of Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo[25]

Box office score data[edit]

Venue City Tickets Sold / Available Gross Revenue
General Motors Place Vancouver 35,527 / 35,527 (100%) $1,289,975[26][27]
Arrowhead Pond of Anaheim Anaheim 13,138 / 13,138 (100%) $508,270[28]
Pine Knob Music Theatre Clarkston 30,548 / 30,548 (100%) $938,675[29]
Molson Amphitheatre Toronto 31,911 / 31,911 (100%) $740,374[30]
BCC Arena Bismarck 8,346 / 8,346 (100%) $270,039[31]
Compaq Center Houston 11,790 / 11,790 (100%) $411,480[32]
Alamodome San Antonio 11,058 / 11,058 (100%) $339,841[32]
BI-LO Center Greenville 14,604 / 14,604 (100%) $420,470[32]
Mississippi Coast Coliseum Biloxi 10,675 / 10,675 (100%) $339,253[32]
Pyramid Arena Memphis 18,915 / 18,915 (100%) $754,723[32]
BJCC Arena Birmingham 13,500 / 16,000 (84%) $418,771[33]
Thompson–Boling Arena Knoxville 14,570 / 14,820 (98%) $447,385[34]
Marine Midland Arena Buffalo 16,759 / 21,452 (78%) $606,671[35]
Bryce Jordan Center University Park 15,100 / 15,274 (99%) $506,375[35]
America West Arena Phoenix 16,128 / 18,135 (89%) $882,960[35]
MGM Grand Garden Arena Las Vegas 11,169 / 15,953 (70%) $872,210[35]
Corel Centre Ottawa 33,126 / 33,126 (100%) $945,621[36]
Winnipeg Arena Winnipeg 29,186 / 29,186 (100%) $822,918[36]
ARCO Arena Sacramento 12,937 / 13,500 (96%) $709,622[36]
Hollywood Bowl Los Angeles 15,011 / 15,011 (100%) $674,050[36]
Coors Amphitheater Chula Vista 15,604 / 19,442 (80%) $593,858[37]
Sandstone Amphitheatre Bonner Springs 17,569 / 17,569 (100%) $589,684[37]
Riverport Amphitheater Maryland Heights 20,904 / 20,904 (100%) $682,317[37]
Deer Creek Music Center Noblesville 21,267 / 21,267 (100%) $684,433[36]
United Center Chicago 19,155 / 19,155 (100%) $934,408[36]
Palace of Auburn Hills Auburn Hills 21,472 / 21,472 (100%) $897,785[36]
Target Center Minneapolis 18,267 / 18,439 (99%) $839,873[36]
First Union Center Philadelphia 18,268 / 18,268 (100%) $935,968[38]
Hersheypark Stadium Hershey 26,609 / 26,609 (100%) $1,024,710[38]
FleetCenter Boston 17,543 / 17,543 (100%) $770,818[39]
Madison Square Garden New York City 18,371 / 18,371 (100%) $1,018,695[40]
Gund Arena Cleveland 20,173 / 20,173 (100%) $695,978[41]
Rose Garden Portland 16,190 / 16,190 (100%) $697,235[42]
Gorge Amphitheatre George 20,000 / 20,000 (100%) $673,570[42]
TOTAL 635,390 / 654,371 (97%) $23,939,015

Broadcasts and recordings[edit]

Twain filmed the tour on three separate occasions. For video release, the concert at the Reunion Arena in Dallas, Texas on September 12, 1998. It featured Twain performing all of her hits songs from her first three albums. The show aired live on DirecTV for its customers at no additional cost. The footage was released the following years titled, Live. The video was certified platinum by the RIAA for shipments exceeding 100,000 units. In 1999, the concerts at the Bayfront Park Amphitheatre were filmed for a concert special airing on TNN. The special entitled, Shania Twain: Winter Break, gave the viewer a behind-the-scenes look of the tour and Twain’s personal life. At the concerts, Twain was joined onstage by English recording artist Elton John, to perform “You're Still the One”, “Something About the Way You Look Tonight” and “Amneris' Letter”. On January 16, 1999, Twain was also joined by American boyband, the Backstreet Boys to perform their hit, “All I Have to Give” and Twain’s “From This Moment On”. The special aired August 30, 1999.[12]

After the release of her “Live” video, Twain filmed an additional concert special at the Texas Stadium in Irving, Texas. Named, Come On Over, Twain performed in front of in front of 40,000 spectators for the special, which aired on CBS on Thanksgiving night.[20] In 2001, both specials were released to DVD titled, The Specials, showing highlights from both concerts. Twain’s benefit concert in Paris, The Paris Concert for Amnesty, filmed on December 10, 1998,[43] was highlighted on DVD release titled, The Paris Concert for Amnesty International. It featured only two performances, “Black Eyes, Blue Tears” and “You’re Still the One”. The full concert aired on Viewers Choice in Canada.

Critical reception[edit]

Although the tour became a financial success, it received mixed feedback from music critics. John Young (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette) found the concert at the Coca Cola Lakewood Amphitheater "too perfect". He writes: "There is nothing inherently wrong with big, loud pop music when its delivered with occasional country twinges. But Twain's music sounded almost too slick and perfectly packaged. Her hit 'You're Still the One,' lacked soul and fire, while most other tunes missing any distinguishing characteristics that made them Twain's own."[44] The performance at the Spokane Veterans Memorial Arena was called "electrifying" by Chris Wille (The Spokesman-Review). He states: "The night's highlight? Practically every song On 'Any Man [o]f Mine,' fans sang along. After '(If You're Not In It for Love) I'm Outta Here!' Twain disappeared through a giant drum, returning in yet another costume. She owned the crowd, and they loved every second of it".[45]

References[edit]

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  43. ^ http://www.thedigitalbits.com/site_archive/reviews/parisconcertamnesty.html
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External links[edit]