Common rosefinch

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Common rosefinch
Carpodacus erythrinus 20060623.jpg
A male singing, in Poland
Conservation status
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Passeriformes
Family: Fringillidae
Genus: Carpodacus
Species: C. erythrinus
Binomial name
Carpodacus erythrinus
(Pallas, 1770)
Common Rosefinch Distribution.png
Distribution map
Synonyms

Erythrina erythrina

The common rosefinch (Carpodacus erythrinus) is the most widespread and common rosefinch of Asia and Europe.

Description[edit]

Female at around 8,000 feet (2,400 m) in Kullu, Himachal Pradesh, India

The common rosefinch is larger than a sparrow. It has a stout and conical bill. The mature male has brilliant rosy-carmine head, breast and rump; heavy bill; dark brown wings with two indistinct bars, and a white belly. Females and young males are dull-colored with yellowish-brown above, brighter on the rump and greyer on head; buff below.

Distribution and habitat[edit]

It has spread westward through Europe in recent decades, even breeding in England once. Common rosefinches breed from the Danube valley, Sweden, and Siberia to the Bering Sea; the Caucasus, northern Iran and Afghanistan, the western Himalayas, Tibet and China; to Japan between latitudes 25° and 68°. In winter they are found from southern Iran to south-east China India, Burma, and Indochina.

They are found in summer in thickets, woodland and forest edges near rivers and in winter in gardens and orchards, wetlands and locally in dry oak woods.

Behaviour[edit]

Eggs of Carpodacus erythrinus

The nest is placed low in a bush. The eggs are dark blue with coarse dark brown spots, and a typical clutch contains five eggs.

Taxonomy[edit]

Because this species and the Scarlet Finch form a phylogenetic group, it has been removed from the genus Carpodacus in some recent taxonomies.[2][3][4][5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ BirdLife International (2012). "Carpodacus erythrinus". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2013.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 26 November 2013. 
  2. ^ Arnaiz-Villena, A; Moscoso J; Ruiz-del-Valle V; González J; Reguera R; Ferri A; Wink M; Serrano-Vale JI (2008). "Mitochondrial DNA Phylogenetic Definition of a Group of "Arid-Zone" Carduelini Finches". The Open Ornithology Journal 1: 1–7. doi:10.2174/1874453200801010001. 
  3. ^ Arnaiz-Villena, A.; Guillén, J.; Ruiz-del-Valle, V.; Lowy, E.; Zamora, J.; Varela, P.; Stefani, D.; Allende, L. M. (2001). "Phylogeography of crossbills, bullfinches, grosbeaks, and rosefinches". Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences 58 (8): 1159–1166. doi:10.1007/PL00000930. PMID 11529508. 
  4. ^ Arnaiz-Villena, A; Gómez-Prieto P; Ruiz-de-Valle V (2009). "Phylogeography of finches and sparrows". Nova Science Publishers. ISBN 978-1-60741-844--3. 
  5. ^ Arnaiz-Villena, A.; Moscoso, J.; Ruiz-del-Valle, V.; Gonzalez, J.; Reguera, R.; Wink, M.; and Serrano-Vela, J. I. (2007). "Bayesian phylogeny of Fringillidae birds: status of the singular African oriole finch Linurgus olivaceus and evolution and heterogeneity of the genus Carpodacus". Acta Zoologica Sinica 53 (5): 826–834. Retrieved 14 December 2009. 

External links[edit]