Communist Party of Nepal (Marxist–Leninist–Maoist)

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Communist Party of Nepal (Marxist–Leninist–Maoist), was a minor communist party in Nepal. The party was as founded in 1981 by Krishna Das Shrestha. Initially it was known as the Nepal Marxist-Leninist Party. Shrestha had broken away from the Bagmati District Committee (which functioned semiautnomously) of the Communist Party of Nepal in 1969.[1]

Krishna Das Shrestha was the party president.

During the 1990 popular uprising against the monarchy, the group formed part of the radical United National People's Movement.[2]

In 1991 the party was one of the organizations that founded the Samyukta Jana Morcha,[3] but it left it following the election.[4]

CPN(MLM) took part in the Joint People's Agitation Committee, which had called for a general strike on 6 April 1992. Violence erupted in the capital during the strike, and according to the human rights NGO HURON 14 people were killed in police firing.[5]

Ahead of the 1992 elections to local bodies CPN(MLM) took part in forming a front together with the Samyukta Jana Morcha, Nepal Workers Peasants Party, Communist Party of Nepal (15 September 1949) and Nepal Communist League.[6]

In 1996 CPN(MLM) denounced the Mahakali Treaty between India and Nepal.

In the parliamentary elections in 1999 CPN(MLM) had put up three candidates.

CPN(MLM) later joined the United Left Front, which demands a Constitutional Assembly as the solution to the political crisis.

In 2005 CPN(MLM) merged with a splinter group, Nepal Samyabadi Party (Marksbadi-Leninbadi-Maobadi) of Nanda Kumar Prasai, and formed the Communist Party of Nepal (Marxist-Leninist-Maoist Centre).

In 2009, CPN(MLM) merged with the Communist Party of Nepal (Maoist).

References[edit]

  1. ^ Rawal, Bhim Bahadur. Nepalma samyabadi andolan: udbhab ra vikas. Kathmandu: Pairavi Prakashan. Chart nr. 1.
  2. ^ Hoftun, Martin, William Raeper and John Whelpton. People, politics and ideology: Democracy and Social Change in Nepal. Kathmandu: Mandala Book Point, 1999. p. 119
  3. ^ Amnesty.de
  4. ^ Upreti, B.C.. The Maoist Insurgency in Nepal: Nature, Growth and Impact. In South Asian Survey 13:1 (2006), page 37
  5. ^ Hoftun, Martin, William Raeper and John Whelpton. People, politics and ideology: Democracy and Social Change in Nepal. Kathmandu: Mandala Book Point, 1999. p. 189
  6. ^ Hoftun, Martin, William Raeper and John Whelpton. People, politics and ideology: Democracy and Social Change in Nepal. Kathmandu: Mandala Book Point, 1999. p. 190