Community mobilization

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Let the communities to introspect and reach a sustainable solution to their problem
It proved an effective way

Community mobilization is an attempt to bring both human and non-human resources together to undertake developmental activities in order to achieve sustainable development.[1]

Process[edit]

Community mobilization is a process through which action is stimulated by a community itself, or by others, that is planned, carried out, and evaluated by a community’s individuals, groups, and organizations on a participatory and sustained basis to improve the health, hygiene and education levels so as to enhance the overall standard of living in the community.[2] A group of people have transcended their differences to meet on equal terms in order to facilitate a participatory decision-making process. In other words it can be viewed as a process which begins a dialogue among members of the community to determine who, what, and how issues are decided, and also to provide an avenue for everyone to participate in decisions that affect their lives.[3]

Requirements[edit]

Community mobilization needs many analytical and supportive resources which are internal (inside community) and external (outside Community) as well. Several of the resources are as following:

  • Leadership
  • Organizational capacity
  • Communications channels
  • Assessments
  • Problem solving
  • Resource mobilization
  • Administrative and operational management

Implications[edit]

Community mobilization is a frequently used term in developmental sector. Recently, community mobilization has been proved to be a valuable and effective concept which has various implications in dealing with basic problems like health and hygiene, population, pollution and gender bias.[4]

1933 Mobilization for Human Needs Conference

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Community Mobilization and Participation". Women and Child Development Department, Govt. of Orrissa. pp. 197–205. 
  2. ^ Delgado-Gaitán, Concha (2001). The Power of Community: Mobilizing for Family and Schooling. New York: Rowman & Littlefield Publishing, Inc. pp. 200–07. ISBN 978-0-7425-1550-5. 
  3. ^ "Community Mobilization and AIDS". UNAIDS - Best Practice Collection. pp. 1–8. 
  4. ^ "Community Mobilization and Participation". Women and Child Development Department, Govt. of Orrissa. pp. 197–205. 
Let the communities to introspect and reach a sustainable solution to their problem
It proved an effective way

Community mobilization is an attempt to bring both human and non-human resources together to undertake developmental activities in order to achieve sustainable development.[1]

Process[edit]

Community mobilization is a process through which action is stimulated by a community itself, or by others, that is planned, carried out, and evaluated by a community’s individuals, groups, and organizations on a participatory and sustained basis to improve the health, hygiene and education levels so as to enhance the overall standard of living in the community.[2] A group of people have transcended their differences to meet on equal terms in order to facilitate a participatory decision-making process. In other words it can be viewed as a process which begins a dialogue among members of the community to determine who, what, and how issues are decided, and also to provide an avenue for everyone to participate in decisions that affect their lives.[3]

Requirements[edit]

Community mobilization needs many analytical and supportive resources which are internal (inside community) and external (outside Community) as well. Several of the resources are as following:

  • Leadership
  • Organizational capacity
  • Communications channels
  • Assessments
  • Problem solving
  • Resource mobilization
  • Administrative and operational management

Implications[edit]

Community mobilization is a frequently used term in developmental sector. Recently, community mobilization has been proved to be a valuable and effective concept which has various implications in dealing with basic problems like health and hygiene, population, pollution and gender bias.[4]

1933 Mobilization for Human Needs Conference

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Community Mobilization and Participation". Women and Child Development Department, Govt. of Orrissa. pp. 197–205. 
  2. ^ Delgado-Gaitán, Concha (2001). The Power of Community: Mobilizing for Family and Schooling. New York: Rowman & Littlefield Publishing, Inc. pp. 200–07. ISBN 978-0-7425-1550-5. 
  3. ^ "Community Mobilization and AIDS". UNAIDS - Best Practice Collection. pp. 1–8. 
  4. ^ "Community Mobilization and Participation". Women and Child Development Department, Govt. of Orrissa. pp. 197–205.