Community Transit

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
This article is about the transit agency in Snohomish County, Washington. It is not to be confused with Cobb Community Transit.
Community Transit
Community Transit logo.svg
Community Transit 25409.jpg
Slogan smile & ride[1]
Commenced operation October 4, 1976 (1976-10-04)[2]
Headquarters 7100 Hardeson Road
Everett, WA 98203[3]
Locale Puget Sound region
Service area Snohomish County, Washington
Service type Bus service
Alliance Sound Transit
Routes 46
Stops 1,500
Fleet 225 buses, 54 paratransit vehicles, 414 vanpool vans[4]
Daily ridership 33,500[2]
Annual ridership 9,093,741 (2013)[5]
Operator First Transit
Chief executive Emmett Heath (interim)
Website communitytransit.org

Community Transit (CT) is the public transit authority of Snohomish County, Washington, United States, excluding the city of Everett, in the Seattle metropolitan area. It operates local transit bus, paratransit and vanpool service within Snohomish County, as well as commuter buses to Downtown Seattle and the University of Washington campus. CT is publicly funded, financed through sales taxes, farebox revenue and subsidies, with an operating budget of $164.3 million. The entire agency carried 9.1 million passengers in 2013, while its bus system carried 8.2 million, placing it fourth among transit agencies in the Puget Sound region.[6]

Community Transit operates a fleet of 225 accessible buses, 54 paratransit vehicles, and 414 vanpool vans, maintained at two bus bases located in the Paine Field industrial area in Everett. Service is provided year-round, excluding Sundays and public holidays, at 1,500 stops on 46 routes throughout the county public transportation benefit area (PTBA). CT began operation as SCPTBA Public Transit on October 4, 1976, four months after the third attempt to establish public transit in Snohomish County was approved. Renamed to Community Transit in 1979, the agency expanded service in its first decades of existence, later taking over King County Metro commuter routes to Seattle in 1989 and adding several cities into its PTBA in the 1980s and 1990s. CT service hours fell during two funding crises in the 2000s, after the passage of Initiative 695 in 1999 and during a severe recession from 2010 to 2012. Despite the cuts, which forced service hours to fall short of rising demand, the agency debuted the state's bus rapid transit line, Swift, as well as introducing "Double Tall" double-decker buses on its commuter routes to Seattle.

History[edit]

The Snohomish County PTBA was established in 1975 after municipal corporations for public transportation were added to the Revised Code of Washington by the Washington State Legislature.[7][8] Its plan for a countywide bus system was approved during a general election on June 1, 1976, funded by a three-tenths increase of the sales tax rate in member cities.[9][10] Two previous attempts to establish a bus system, under the Snohomish County Transportation Authority (SNOTRAN) in 1974,[11] were rejected by voters from the entirety of Snohomish County.[12][13] Heavy opposition came from the residents of Everett because of the high sales tax rate and planned absorption of Everett Transit, acquired by the city in 1969,[14] forcing the SCPTBA to exclude Everett in its successful attempt at creating a bus system.[15] SCPTBA Public Transit began operating in the cities of Brier, Edmonds, Lynnwood, Marysville, Mountlake Terrace, Snohomish and Woodway on October 4,[16] using 18 leased GMC buses on seven routes carrying 6,414 passengers without fares during the first week.[17][18]

SCPTBA Public Transit, nicknamed the "Blue Bus" for its blue livery,[19] carried 951,200 passengers in its first year of service on 15 local routes and 16 commuter express routes to Downtown Seattle and Northgate,[20] contracted through King County Metro as a continuation of service provided by the Metropolitan Transit Corporation to southern Snohomish County prior to its merger with Seattle Transit System in 1973.[21][22] The buses ran for 16 hours a day, charging a base fare of 20 cents;[23] among the most popular lines was Route R14, accounting for 21 percent of system ridership in the first three months, running from the Edmonds waterfront to Lynnwood and the Boeing Everett Factory.[24] The agency acquired its first federal subsidies from the Urban Mass Transit Administration for the 1978 fiscal year, to be used on the purchase of 18 new buses as well as bus stop amenities, such as stop signs and shelters.[20]

Community Transit was selected as the official name of the agency on June 19, 1979, recommended by Seattle-based public relations firm McConnell Company ahead of the winners of a public contest held by SCPTBA two years prior.[19][25] CT continued to grow through the end of the decade, annexing the cities of Arlington, Lake Stevens, Monroe, Granite Falls, Mukilteo, Stanwood and Sultan into the PTBA by 1980;[20][26] the bus system had the largest growth in ridership within the state in 1980, with local routes gaining 68.3 percent more riders and Metro-operated "Cream Buses" to Seattle gaining 21.4 percent more riders.[26][27] Metro altered their numbering scheme for Snohomish County routes in 1981, creating the 400-series of routes, after the opening of the state's largest park and ride in Lynnwood.[28] The annexations of outlying communities in northern and eastern Snohomish County and the completion of park and rides in Edmonds and Mountlake Terrace saw ridership rise to over 3 million passengers by 1983.[29] Community Transit took over the remaining commuter routes to Seattle in 1989,[30][31] after commuter service was subcontracted to American Transportation Enterprises in 1986.[32] The move to a private carrier was opposed by both Metro and the Amalgamated Transit Union,[33][34] but the introduction of 49 air conditioned coaches led to a 25 percent increase in ridership by January 1987.[35][36] Commuter express service via Interstate 405 from CT park and rides in South Snohomish County to the Eastside cities of Bellevue and Redmond began in 1988 and 1990, respectively,[37][38] while Seattle service was expanded with weekend service in 1990.[39] The agency dedicated its own 20-acre (8.1 ha) bus base at Kasch Park in 1985, replacing shared operations with the Edmonds School District and Everett Transit, at a cost of $4.8 million that was mostly subsidized by the Urban Mass Transit Administration.[40][41]

CT was involved in a criminal investigation conducted by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) in the mid 1990s of Ed's Transmission, a transmission shop in Everett used by the agency for bus parts. Detectives from the FBI and Snohomish County Sheriff seized records from both parties and began a two-month audit of Community Transit management.[42] The auditors released a report that criticized the management style of Executive Director Ken Graska and his department heads, leading to the former's resignation in December 1993 after nine years at his position.[43] Federal prosecutors accused Ralph Woodall, the 50-year-old co-owner of the shop, of 15 counts of mail fraud after intentionally overbilling for transmission repairs. Community Transit Maintenance Director Michael Lynn resigned after confessing that he had accepted gifts from Woodall in exhange for sending all of CT's transmissions to Ed's Transmissions without going through competitive bidding.[44] A U.S. District Court jury found Woodall guilty of 15 counts of mail fraud in December 1996,[45] with Judge John C. Coughenour sentencing him to 2.5 years in federal prison the following May, along with Ed's Transmission being forced to pay a $825,000 settlement after a civil suit was filed.[46]

In their most recent expansion in 1997, the Snohomish County PTBA annexed the Eastmont and Silver Firs census-designated places between Everett and Mill Creek, as well as the Tulalip Indian Reservation west of Marysville.[47][48] During the same year, CT awarded its $31.8 million commuter service contract to Grosvenor Bus Lines, which would later fold into First Transit, replacing their first subcontractor, Ryder/ATE Management.[49] The agency introduced the first low-floor articulated buses in the United States into its fleet in 1999, purchasing 17 60-foot-long (18 m) buses from New Flyer to improve accessibility for older and disabled riders.[50] Service improvements throughout the 1990s, including raising service hours to over 11 million, led to ridership peaking at 8.8 million by the end of the decade and celebrated its 100 millionth rider in April 2000.[51][52] The passage of Initiative 695 in 1999, which capped the state motor-vehicle excise tax at $30, forced transit agencies throughout the state to cut service in anticipation of lower revenue. Facing the loss of $18 million, or 30 percent of its annual operating budget, Community Transit eliminated all weekend service and increased fares on its routes in February 2000.[53] With the service cuts, CT began its VanGO program to donate its retired paratransit minibuses to nonprofit organizations in Snohomish County instead of auctioning them off.[54] Saturday service was reinstated in September 2000, using emergency funds approved by the CT Board,[55] while Sunday service returned in 2001 after the passage of a 0.3 percentage-point tax increase by voters in the PTBA.[56] Further restoration of service came in 2003, with increased frequency and the replacement of 50 buses in the agency's fleet made possible by a budget surplus and the sales tax increase approved in 2002,[57] and in 2005, with increased fares.[58]

Community Transit introduced its current logo and slogan in 2005, replacing an older one in use since 1986 and retaining its blue-and-white color scheme, as part of the roll-out of the first New Flyer Invero buses in the United States.[1][59] CT began a three-month pilot project in September 2005 that brought wi-fi access to buses on its longest route, Route 422 between Stanwood and Seattle, with hopes of attracting customers and partial-telecommuters to its routes.[60][61] The pilot project was deemed a success and expanded into the "Surf and Ride" program on all Route 422 trips in 2006, as well as select trips on Routes 406 and 441 from Edmonds to Seattle and Overlake on the Eastside, respectively; the wi-fi program was canceled in 2010, with the removal of equipment in buses brought on by low customer response, budget constraints and the adoption of improved cellular networks that support mobile browsing on smartphones.[62]

CT and First Transit signed their third and most recent contract in 2007, continuing the latter's operation of CT commuter service to Seattle;[63] both agencies debuted the first double-decker buses in the Puget Sound region during a year-long test in 2007, with Community Transit buying its own Alexander Dennis Enviro500s for its "Double Tall" fleet.[64] A PTBA expansion into the unincorporated areas of Cathcart, Clearview and Maltby was attempted during the 2008 general elections, but failed to gain a majority vote.[65] In November 2009, after three years of planning and a year of construction,[66][67] Community Transit debuted the first bus rapid transit line in Washington, Swift. The service replaced Route 100 on State Route 99 between Aurora Village in Shoreline and Everett Station, featuring 12-minute headways, off-board fare payment and transit signal priority.[68] The Great Recession of the late 2000s and subsequent loss of an estimated $180 million in sales tax revenue in Snohomish County forced CT to cut service by 15 percent in June 2010, including the elimination of all service on Sundays and major holidays, to save $16 million until 2012.[69][70][71] A second cut, with 20 percent of service eliminated, took place in February 2012;[72] the CT Board rejected a major restructure that would have truncated its northern and eastern express service to Seattle at Lynnwood Transit Center during this cut, instead opting to preserve its commuter service.[73] Despite the decline in service hours, Community Transit and Sound Transit had record ridership for Snohomish County routes during the Super Bowl XVIII parade in Downtown Seattle in February 2014, carrying a total of 22,500 passengers on 50 extra trips into Seattle.[74] In March, the 2014 Oso mudslide destroyed a portion of State Route 530 and forced CT to re-route its service to Darrington through Skagit County, offering one-seat service to Smokey Point and Everett Station in the interim as Route 231.[75] The partial reopening of State Route 530 in June and full reopening in September restored the original Route 230 on its original route, now extended to Smokey Point.[76] In September 2014, the first service improvement since the Great Recession restored 7,500 hours of bus service for Community Transit, adding back 13 percent of service prior to the 2010 cuts, part of a recovery plan that includes increasing service by 17 percent in 2015.[77]

Proposed consolidations with Everett Transit[edit]

See also: Everett Transit

Attempted mergers of Community Transit with Everett Transit have been proposed by the Washington State Legislature and the CT Board since the formation of SNOTRAN in 1974.[78] The relative success of Community Transit in the late 1970s and 1980s prompted the Community Transit Board to propose consolidation with Everett Transit in 1988, though long-term planning under SNOTRAN for both agencies worked under the assumption that there would be no merger by 2000.[79] In 1990, a second proposal was rejected by the Everett City Council after consultants determined that a merger would only save $350,000 per year in deadheading for Community Transit and that both staffs would need to be retained because of the lack of service duplication between the two agencies.[80] Throughout the 1990s, successive legislative bills proposing a merger were passed through the House Transportation Committee, but failed to gain support elsewhere because of successful lobbying from the City of Everett.[78][81][82] State voters approved Referendum 49 in November 1998, including state motor-vehicle excise tax revenue for city-run transit in Everett and Yakmia. While Everett Transit gained $4.5 million in new annual funding, CT was set to lose $1 million over the next five years in addition to the $2 million used to operate service within Everett annually.[83] The large cuts brought on by the passing of Initiative 695 and subsequent loss of excise tax revenue forced both agencies to consider merging in 2000,[84] with savings of an estimated $1.7 million per year according to a study commissioned by Community Transit.[85] As a result of the failed mergers, CT proposed truncating its routes at Everett city limits, but ultimately decided to provide limited-stop service on its routes through Everett to the newly constructed Everett Station in 2002.[86][87][88] Community Transit and Everett Transit signed their first partnership agreement in 2007, with Everett helping fund Swift bus rapid transit through its service area and allowing CT to operate the route in exchange for the expansion of ET service into unincorporated areas surrounding Everett.[89][90] The two agencies further collaborated with Sound Transit and the Washington State Department of Transportation in the construction of the South Everett Freeway Station the following year.[91]

Regional collaboration with Sound Transit[edit]

Main article: Sound Transit

Community Transit and Everett Transit agreed to break away from SNOTRAN, which served as their planning and administrative body in addition to disbursing federal subsidies, after CT complained of a "lack of communication" between the three agencies.[92] The county agency formally disbanded on December 31, 1994,[11] replaced by the Joint Regional Policy Committee (JRPC) that formed four years prior to coordinate transit planning for the entire Puget Sound region.[93] A regional transit agency was formed in 1993 under the JRPC, organizing a $6.7 billion (equivalent to $10.4 billion in 2014)[94] plan for regional transit that was put to a vote on March 14, 1995, failing to pass outside of Seattle, Mercer Island and Shoreline.[95][96] The plan included a commuter rail line on the BNSF Scenic Subdivision between Everett, Mukilteo, Edmonds and King Street Station in Seattle, a light rail line from Lynnwood to Seattle following Interstate 5, and express bus service to light rail stations.[97] The following November, the smaller "Sound Move" plan was approved at a cost of $3.9 billion (equivalent to $5.86 billion in 2014)[94], including commuter rail from Everett to Seattle and express buses on Interstate 5 from Everett and Lynnwood to Seattle and Bellevue.[98][99] The regional transit agency, renamed to Sound Transit,[100] began operating its Sound Transit Express buses under contract with Community Transit in September 1999.[101][102][103]

Administration[edit]

Community Transit is administered by a nine-member board, composed of two members of the Snohomish County Council, two elected officials from PTBA cities with populations of 30,000 or more, three elected officials from cities with between 10,000 and 30,000, and two elected officials from cities with less than 10,000, that meets monthly at their headquarters in Everett.[104]:7 The board is led by a non-voting chief executive officer, a position held by interim CEO Emmett Heath since the retirement of Joyce Eleanor in 2014.[105][106] CT had an operating budget of $164.3 million for 2014; 65 to 70 percent of revenue is provided by a 0.9 percent sales tax within the PTBA, the maximum authorized for transit agencies under state law, while a combination of fares and federal subsidies comprise the remainder.[5][107] The agency employs 534 full-time equivalent persons, divided into eight departments.[104]:7

CT is headquartered at their Merrill Creek Operating Base at 7000 Hardeson Road in the Paine Field industrial area of South Everett, located northeast of the Boeing Everett Factory. The 87,065-square-foot (8,088.6 m2) Merrill Creek administrative building opened in 1997 and is the primary bus base for the agency's fleet of buses and vans.[108] Additional administrative buildings and fleet parking lots are located at the Kasch Park Operating Base south of the Boeing Freeway.[104]:18

Services[edit]

The bus shelters and parking garage at Mountlake Terrace Transit Center, served by several local routes and commuter routes on nearby Interstate 5.

Community Transit operates fixed bus routes throughout the 1,308-square-mile (3,390 km2) Snohomish County PTBA,[4] serving 47 percent of its 533,746 people and 76 percent of its 153,300 employers.[104]:40–41[109] The 46 bus routes serve 1,500 bus stops, of which 250 have a bus shelter—the rest consist of a sign and bench.[104]:24 The bus routes are divided into three types of service, numbered according to destination: frequent bus rapid transit on the unnumbered Swift,[110] 24 local routes in the 100s for southern Snohomish County and 200s for northern and eastern Snohomish County, and 22 weekday peak-only commuter express routes from park and rides to the Boeing Everett Factory in the 2X7s,[111] Downtown Seattle in the 400s,[112] and the University of Washington campus in the 800s.[113][114] CT and their subcontractor First Transit also operate all-day, all-week Sound Transit Express service to Seattle and Bellevue on six routes numbered in the 500s.[115] Typically, service changes occur in February and September, in response to ridership and requests from the community.[116]

Commuter bus routes to Boeing in Everett, Downtown Seattle and the University District originate at one of the 24 Community Transit park and rides and transit centers located throughout Snohomish County, with a total capacity of 8,500 automobiles.[104]:18–19[117] The largest facilities, primarily located in southwest Snohomish County, include weatherproof bicycle lockers in addition to automobile parking.[118] The majority of park and rides are owned by the Washington State Department of Transportation and maintained by Community Transit and other service providers.[104]:21–23[119]

In addition to bus service, CT operates a vanpool program with a fleet of 414 vans originating from the Kasch Park operating base in Everett. The fleet comes in configurations with 7, 12, or 15 seats, with two special vans equipped with wheelchair lifts.[120] Community Transit reports that there are 362 active vanpools using their service, providing 0.9 million rides in 2013.[104]:16 CT leases vanpool lots, called "park and pool lots", from local churches and other private parties at 15 locations with a total capacity of 425 parking stalls.[104]:18–19

Dial-a-ride transportation (DART) service is also offered by Community Transit, contracted through Senior Services of Snohomish County since 1981.[4][121] DART paratransit is available for a fare of $2 for qualifying customers within 0.75 miles (1.21 km) of local CT routes during regular operating hours.[122] As of 2013, CT has 4,000 registered DART users that take an average of 600 trips per day.[104]:16

Fares[edit]

As of February 1, 2013;[123][124] does not include Sound Transit fares
Fare Type Adult Youth Reduced
Local $2.00 $1.50 $1.00
Commuter-South/Everett $4.00 $3.00 $2.00
Commuter-North/East $5.25 $4.00 $2.50

Fares on Community Transit buses are priced into three groups: adult, youth, and reduced. Adult fare is charged for passengers between the ages of 19 and 64, youth fare is charged for passengers between the ages of 6 and 18, and the reduced fare is charged for passengers over the age of 65 or those with disabilities or Medicare card holders. Up to two children under the age of 5 ride free with a chaperon paying full or reduced fare for themselves. Fares also change based on service level, with local service within Snohomish County costing the least and commuter service to Seattle being more expensive; commuter service from southern Snohomish County and Everett is also less costly compared to commuter service from northern and eastern Snohomish County.[123] The last fare increase occurred on January 17, 2013, raising the local fare by 25 cents for all riders.[124]

The regional ORCA card was introduced as an integrated smart card for transit agencies in the Puget Sound region on April 20, 2009,[125] allowing users to load monthly passes and value through an e-purse web interface. The card also allowed free transfers within a two-hour period between transit agencies of equal value, with the difference for higher fare subtracted from the e-purse or prompting for cash.[126] While initially available for no fee, effective March 1, 2010 a $5 cost was added when ordering a standard adult or youth ORCA card.[127] CT removed their paper transfers on January 1, 2010 after the ORCA card made them obsolete.[128]

Community Transit also offers three monthly passes through local higher education institutions, including Edmonds Community College, the University of Washington, Cascadia College, and the Lynnwood Campus of Central Washington University.[123]

Dial-a-ride transportation, a type of paratransit service operated by Community Transit, has a flat fare of $2 without discounts or separate categories. ORCA cards are not accepted on DART, replaced by tickets and monthly passes for frequent users.[123]

Fleet[edit]

As of January 2014, CT maintains and operates a fleet of 696 vehicles from its operating bases at Kasch Park and Merrill Creek. The bus fleet has been reduced from 291 vehicles in 2010 because of major service cuts in 2010 and 2012, forcing Community Transit to downsize in order to comply with the spare ratio policies set by the Federal Transit Administration. The fleet is composed of 30-foot (9.1 m) and 40-foot (12 m) vehicles, as well as specialized 60-foot (18 m) articulated buses and 42-foot (13 m) double-decker buses. Buses typically are powered by diesel engines, with the exception of the 15 hybrid diesel-electric Swift articulated buses and 15 40-foot (12 m) hybrid buses.[104]:25–26

Since 1995,[129] all Community Transit buses are low-floored and equipped with a hydraulic or pneumatic "kneeling" device in addition to wheelchair lifts for 6-wheeled motorized wheelchairs.[122][130] CT buses have also feature two bicycle racks located in front of the windshield since 1996;[118][131] Swift bus rapid transit buses have three bike racks located inside the vehicle for reduced dwell times.[110][132]

In addition to its bus fleet, Community Transit maintains 414 vans for its vanpool program and 54 DART paratransit minibuses equipped with wheelchair lifts.[104]:25–26 Retired vanpool and DART vehicles are donated to local non-profit organizations through the VanGO program,[133] which has gifted 106 vans since its establishment in 2000.[134][135]

Double Tall[edit]

The leased Alexander Dennis Enviro500 in Community Transit livery, pictured in Downtown Seattle in 2007.

Community Transit has a fleet of 23 double-decker buses used on commuter routes from park and rides to Downtown Seattle, named the "Double Tall" in reference to the double tall cup size at Starbucks, a coffee chain founded and headquartered in Seattle.[136] The Alexander Dennis Enviro500 was introduced during a one-year pilot project in 2007, on lease from Alexander Dennis for $15,000 per month.[137][138] The 42-foot-long (13 m), 14-foot-high (4 m) Enviro500 seated 77, with standing room for 20 additional passengers, replacing the capacity of the standard articulated buses used on the commuter routes in a smaller footprint.[139] Prior to the end of the trial in 2008, CT placed an order of 23 Enviro500s, scheduled to be delivered and put into service in 2010;[64][140][141] the initial order was not fulfilled until 2011, when manufacturing was moved to an ElDorado plant in Riverside, California to meet federal Buy American requirements.[142][143] A second order of 17 Enviro500s, to replace older articulated buses, was made in 2013 and is scheduled to be in service by summer 2015.[144][145][146] Sound Transit ordered 5 of its own double-decker buses in 2014 to be used on their Snohomish County routes and driven by First Transit drivers after delivery in May 2015.[147][148]

With its expected fleet of 40 double-decker buses, Community Transit will have the second-largest double-decker fleet of any public transit agency in the United States, behind RTC Transit of Las Vegas, Nevada and ahead of Unitrans of Davis, California and Antelope Valley Transit Authority of Antelope Valley, California.[139]

Current Bus Fleet[edit]

As of December 2013[citation needed]
Year Manufacturer Model Fleet Numbers Engine & Transmission Fuel Type Notes Image
1997 New Flyer D30LF 7624–7647 Diesel
  • Only 7628, 7630, and 7633 are still in service
Community Transit 7639 (NFI D30LF) in Edmonds.jpg
1998 New Flyer D60LF 8838–8854 Diesel
1999 New Flyer D40LF 9152–9171
  • Detroit Diesel Series 50
  • Allison B400R
Diesel Community Transit 9165 (1999 NFI D40LF) at Aurora Village TC.jpg
2000 New Flyer D60LF 20855–20872
  • Detroit Diesel Series 50
  • Allison B500R
Diesel
2003 New Flyer D60LF 23800–23828
  • Detroit Diesel Series 50EGR
  • Allison B500R
Diesel Community Transit 23801 (2003 NFI D60LF) at Brickyard P&R.jpg
2004 New Flyer D40i 24400–24420
  • Cummins ISL
  • Allison B400R
Diesel Community Transit New Flyer D40i Invero.png
2005 New Flyer D40i 25400–25411
  • Cummins ISL
  • Allison B400R
Diesel Community Transit 25405 and 24412 at Everett Station.jpg
2005 New Flyer D60LF 25800–25815 Diesel Community Transit 25809 at UW, cropped.jpg
2007 New Flyer D60LF 27800–27811
  • Caterpillar C9
  • Allison B500R
Diesel
2008 New Flyer D40LFR 28100–28111
  • Cummins ISL
  • Allison B400R
Diesel CT 28106 - 2011 New Flyer D40LFR at Lynnwood TC.jpg
2009 New Flyer DE60LFA 29700–29714
  • Cummins ISL9
  • Allison Transmission EP-50 HybriDrive
Diesel-electric hybrid Community Transit Swift 29712 at Crossroads in Lynnwood.jpg
2011 Alexander Dennis Enviro500 10800–10822
  • Cummins ISM
  • Allison Transmission B500R
Diesel CT 10805 Double Tall in Downtown Seattle.jpg
2011 New Flyer XD40 11100–11108
  • Cummins ISL9
  • Allison B400R
Diesel
2011 New Flyer XDE40 11109–11123 Diesel-electric hybrid Community Transit 11111 (New Flyer XDE40) at Lynnwood TC.jpg
2013 Gillig BRT 13600–13612
  • Cummins ISL9
  • Allison B400R
Diesel Community Transit 2013 Gillig Low Floor - 13603.jpg
2014 Alexander Dennis Enviro500 TBA
  • Cummins ISM
  • Allison Transmission B500R
Diesel

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Community Transit Debuts First U.S. Invero Bus" (Press release). Everett, Washington: Community Transit. March 1, 2005. Retrieved September 1, 2014. 
  2. ^ a b "Agency Profile". Community Transit. Retrieved September 1, 2014. 
  3. ^ "Contact Us". Community Transit. Retrieved September 1, 2014. 
  4. ^ a b c Heath, Emmett (May 27, 2014) (PDF). 2013 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report, Years Ending December 31, 2013 and December 31, 2012 (Report). Community Transit. p. 109. http://www.commtrans.org/About/Documents/2013%20Community%20Transit%20CAFR%20Web%20Ready.pdf. Retrieved September 1, 2014.
  5. ^ a b (PDF) Community Transit's 2014 Budget (Report). Community Transit. December 5, 2013. http://www.commtrans.org/About/Documents/CommunityTransitAdoptedBudget2014.pdf. Retrieved September 1, 2014.
  6. ^ Charnews, Mark (May 2014). "Regional Transit Ridership" (PDF). Puget Sound Trends. Puget Sound Regional Council. Retrieved September 1, 2014. 
  7. ^ Aweeka, Charles (July 20, 1975). "Meeting set on public transit". The Seattle Times. p. A22. 
  8. ^ White, Richard O., ed. (July 1, 1975). "Chapter 270 (Engrossed Substitute Senate Bill No. 2280): Public Transportation". 1975 Session Laws of the State of Washington - 1st Extraordinary Session, Forty-Fourth Legislature (PDF). Session Laws of the State of Washington (1975 ed.). Olympia, Washington: Washington State Legislature. pp. 979–993. OCLC 42336168. Retrieved September 1, 2014. 
  9. ^ Lane, Bob (June 2, 1976). "Snohomish County bus system OK'd". The Seattle Times. p. A10. 
  10. ^ "Community Transit Marks 35th Anniversary" (Press release). Everett, Washington: Community Transit. October 3, 2011. Retrieved September 1, 2014. 
  11. ^ a b Brooks, Diane (December 30, 1994). "Sno-Tran Has Met Goals, Calling It A Day -- Tomorrow Ends Decade Of Success For Transit Agency". The Seattle Times. Retrieved September 1, 2014. 
  12. ^ Daniel, Linda (September 18, 1974). "Snohomish County: Bus-system proposal defeated". The Seattle Times. p. A15. 
  13. ^ "Transit fails again in Snohomish County". The Seattle Times. November 6, 1974. p. A18. 
  14. ^ "Everett Voters Approve City Transit Venture". The Seattle Times. November 5, 1969. p. 43. 
  15. ^ Lane, Bob (October 24, 1974). "Snohomish County again to try transit plan". The Seattle Times. p. A26. 
  16. ^ Lane, Bob (May 30, 1976). "Part of Snohomish County to vote on transit Tuesday". The Seattle Times. p. E4. 
  17. ^ Lane, Bob (September 26, 1976). "Bus service to begin Oct. 4 in Snohomish County areas". The Seattle Times. p. A14. 
  18. ^ "New bus system works 'pretty well' on first day". The Seattle Times. October 5, 1976. p. D16. 
  19. ^ a b Aweeka, Charles (June 20, 1979). "County transit finally ends name game". The Seattle Times. p. H1. 
  20. ^ a b c Cartwright, Jane (October 5, 1977). "Snohomish Co. transit system in successful year". The Seattle Times. p. H3. 
  21. ^ Lane, Bob (December 20, 1972). "2 OK's ease way for Metro busses in Snohomish". The Seattle Times. p. D2. 
  22. ^ Bergsman, Jerry (January 2, 1973). "In Lynnwood: Here it comes—there it goes". The Seattle Times. p. A14. 
  23. ^ Lane, Bob (November 17, 1976). "Snohomish County public transit is going places". The Seattle Times. p. B12. 
  24. ^ Lane, Bob (January 26, 1977). "One blessing: New bus system can only be measured in months". The Seattle Times. p. H9. 
  25. ^ Cartwright, Jane (June 29, 1977). "What's in a name? Buses are the same". The Seattle Times. p. H1. 
  26. ^ a b Suffia, David (October 8, 1980). "Community Transit marking four years of growth". The Seattle Times. p. F2. 
  27. ^ Macdonald, Sally (August 13, 1980). "Gains in bus ridership highest in state". The Seattle Times. p. F1. 
  28. ^ Aweeka, Charles (May 20, 1981). "Lynnwood park-and-ride lot ready for use". The Seattle Times. p. G2. 
  29. ^ Public Transportation Office (October 1984). "Local Transit Statewide: Community Transit" (PDF). Public Transportation in Washington State (Report). Washington State Department of Transportation. pp. 37–43. OCLC 13007541. http://ntl.bts.gov/lib/12000/12700/12792/12792.pdf. Retrieved September 11, 2014.
  30. ^ Bergsman, Jerry (September 21, 1988). "Metro Buses Won't Be Traveling To Snohomish County After April". The Seattle Times. p. H5. Retrieved September 8, 2014 – via NewsBank. (subscription required (help)). 
  31. ^ Bergsman, Jerry (June 9, 1989). "Some Bus Commuters To Say Goodbye To Metro". The Seattle Times. p. B3. Retrieved September 8, 2014 – via NewsBank. (subscription required (help)). 
  32. ^ Aweeka, Charles (July 23, 1986). "Harmony Reached So Buses Can Roll". The Seattle Times. p. H1. Retrieved September 8, 2014 – via NewsBank. (subscription required (help)). 
  33. ^ Aweeka, Charles (July 3, 1985). "Metro Warns CT About Expanding Into Downtown Seattle". The Seattle Times. p. H1. Retrieved September 8, 2014 – via NewsBank. (subscription required (help)). 
  34. ^ Aweeka, Charles (January 22, 1986). "Transit Union Concerned Over Private Contract - Community Transit Pushing Plan To Contract For Service To Seattle". The Seattle Times. p. D1. Retrieved September 8, 2014 – via NewsBank. (subscription required (help)). 
  35. ^ Gilje, Shelby (September 23, 1986). "Rider Contends Comfort Has Taken A Back Seat On Commuter Buses". The Seattle Times. p. E7. Retrieved September 8, 2014 – via NewsBank. (subscription required (help)). 
  36. ^ Aweeka, Charles (January 7, 1987). "Commuters Flock To New CT Buses". The Seattle Times. p. H1. Retrieved September 8, 2014 – via NewsBank. (subscription required (help)). 
  37. ^ Clutter, Stephen (June 14, 1988). "Lynnwood-Bellevue Bus Off And Rolling - Ridership Low, But Spirits High". The Seattle Times. p. B3. Retrieved September 8, 2014 – via NewsBank. (subscription required (help)). 
  38. ^ "CT To Begin Limited Bus Service To Redmond". The Seattle Times. June 21, 1990. Retrieved September 8, 2014. 
  39. ^ Bergsman, Jerry (June 4, 1990). "CT To Expand Commuter Service -- Weekend Runs Will Be Offered". The Seattle Times. Retrieved September 8, 2014. 
  40. ^ Aweeka, Charles (May 1, 1985). "New Everett Base To Bring Community Transit Together". The Seattle Times. p. H1. Retrieved September 8, 2014 – via NewsBank. (subscription required (help)). 
  41. ^ Aweeka, Charles (October 9, 1985). "Transit Head Puts Brakes To Maintenance Flap". The Seattle Times. p. H2. Retrieved September 8, 2014 – via NewsBank. (subscription required (help)). 
  42. ^ Bergsman, Jerry; Alexander, Karen (July 22, 1993). "Investigators Seize CT Records -- Agency Is Target Of Federal Probe Involving Service Work". The Seattle Times. Retrieved September 28, 2014. 
  43. ^ Alexander, Karen; Brooks, Diane (December 1, 1993). "CT's Director Resigns". The Seattle Times. Retrieved September 28, 2014. 
  44. ^ Brooks, Diane (December 10, 1996). "Federal Trial Begins Over Fraud Alleged In CT Bus Repairs". The Seattle Times. Retrieved September 28, 2014. 
  45. ^ Clutter, Stephen (December 24, 1996). "Mechanic Is Guilty Of Fraud". The Seattle Times. Retrieved September 28, 2014. 
  46. ^ Koch, Anne (May 31, 1997). "Shop Owner Sentenced To 2 1/2 Years For CT Fraud". The Seattle Times. Retrieved September 28, 2014. 
  47. ^ Brooks, Diane (September 3, 1997). "Buses On Ballot Later This Month -- 5 Areas To Be Asked To Join CT District". The Seattle Times. Retrieved September 28, 2014. 
  48. ^ "CT Sets Annexation Workshops". The Seattle Times. October 27, 1997. Retrieved September 28, 2014. 
  49. ^ "CT To Get New Commuter Service". The Seattle Times. June 9, 1997. Retrieved September 29, 2014. 
  50. ^ "CT Phases In 17 New Low-Floor Buses". The Seattle Times. April 19, 1999. Retrieved September 28, 2014. 
  51. ^ "Olson Marks 10 Years of Strong Leadership" (Press release). Everett, Washington: Community Transit. July 22, 2004. Retrieved September 28, 2014. 
  52. ^ "100 million served by CT". The Seattle Times. April 21, 2000. Retrieved September 28, 2014. 
  53. ^ "Bus service cut after I-695". The Seattle Times. February 4, 2000. Retrieved September 28, 2014. 
  54. ^ Vinluan, Frank (February 10, 2000). "CT offers free vans to ease 695 woes". The Seattle Times. Retrieved September 28, 2014. 
  55. ^ Burkitt, Janet (July 7, 2000). "I-695 bus cuts will be restored". The Seattle Times. Retrieved September 28, 2014. 
  56. ^ Burkitt, Janet (September 19, 2001). "Snohomish County: Transit sales tax pushing ahead". The Seattle Times. Retrieved September 28, 2014. 
  57. ^ Hodges, Jane (October 30, 2002). "Bus agency proposes increase in service". The Seattle Times. Retrieved September 28, 2014. 
  58. ^ Schwarzen, Christopher (May 11, 2005). "Community Transit to boost fares, routes". The Seattle Times. Retrieved September 28, 2014. 
  59. ^ "New Flyer delivers first Inveros to US property" (Press release). Winnipeg, Manitoba: New Flyer Industries. January 17, 2005. Retrieved September 30, 2014. 
  60. ^ "Community Transit Offers WiFi Access on Select Buses" (Press release). Everett, Washington: Community Transit. September 9, 2005. Retrieved September 30, 2014. 
  61. ^ Gilmore, Susan (September 7, 2005). "Transit services adding Wi-Fi to buses". The Seattle Times. Retrieved September 30, 2014. 
  62. ^ "Surf and Ride Wi-Fi Service". Community Transit. Archived from the original on January 27, 2010. Retrieved September 30, 2014. 
  63. ^ "Snohomish County Community Transit Renews Contract with First Transit" (Press release). Cincinnati, Ohio: First Transit. May 1, 2007. Retrieved September 30, 2014. 
  64. ^ a b "Make That 23 Double Talls, Please" (Press release). Everett, Washington: Community Transit. March 31, 2008. Retrieved September 1, 2014. 
  65. ^ "Statement of Vote - Snohomish County General Election, November 04, 2008: PTBA Annexation" (PDF). Snohomish County, Washington. November 11, 2008. Retrieved September 30, 2014. 
  66. ^ "New Bus Rapid Transit Route Called "Swift"" (Press release). Everett, Washington: Community Transit. July 27, 2006. Retrieved September 30, 2014. 
  67. ^ "Swift Groundbreaking Dec. 3" (Press release). Everett, Washington: Community Transit. November 24, 2008. Retrieved September 30, 2014. 
  68. ^ "Swift Bus Rapid Transit to Fly on Nov. 29" (Press release). Everett, Washington: Community Transit. November 16, 2009. Retrieved September 30, 2014. 
  69. ^ "Agency Prepares for Sunday Service Suspension, Other Cuts, Effective June 13" (Press release). Everett, Washington: Community Transit. May 27, 2010. Retrieved September 30, 2014. 
  70. ^ Lindblom, Mike (March 4, 2010). "Community Transit announces cuts to bus and van service". The Seattle Times. Retrieved September 30, 2014. 
  71. ^ Sheets, Bill (June 6, 2010). "Community Transit gives away vans; to cut service". The Herald (Everett, Washington: The Washington Post Company). Retrieved September 30, 2014. 
  72. ^ "Board Selects Hybrid Service Alternative" (Press release). Everett, Washington: Community Transit. September 1, 2011. Retrieved September 30, 2014. 
  73. ^ "2012 Service Change: Commuter Comparison Chart". Community Transit. 2011. Archived from the original on August 13, 2011. Retrieved September 30, 2014. 
  74. ^ "Public transportation teamwork moved unprecedented number of Seahawks fans and commuters" (Press release). Seattle, Washington: Sound Transit. February 6, 2014. Retrieved September 30, 2014. 
  75. ^ "Emergency Darrington Bus Service" (Press release). Everett, Washington: Community Transit. March 26, 2014. Retrieved September 30, 2014. 
  76. ^ "Darrington Service Returns to Hwy 530 June 9; Route 231 Will End" (Press release). Everett, Washington: Community Transit. May 28, 2014. Retrieved September 30, 2014. 
  77. ^ "New Bus Service Begins September 29" (Press release). Everett, Washington: Community Transit. September 11, 2014. Retrieved September 30, 2014. 
  78. ^ a b Brooks, Diane; Johnston, Shannon (February 2, 1994). "Everett Transit, CT Merger Meets Resistance -- Momentum To Join Bus Systems Coming Out Of Olympia". The Seattle Times. Retrieved September 28, 2014. 
  79. ^ Bergsman, Jerry (November 10, 1988). "CT Board Talks Of Merging Bus Systems". The Seattle Times. p. D3. Retrieved September 28, 2014 – via NewsBank. (subscription required (help)). 
  80. ^ Bergsman, Jerry (November 2, 1990). "Bus-System Merger Discounted -- Consultant Can See No Savings". The Seattle Times. Retrieved September 28, 2014. 
  81. ^ Brooks, Diane (March 7, 1994). "Transit Merger Likely To Resurface -- Key Legislator May Introduce New Bill". The Seattle Times. Retrieved September 28, 2014. 
  82. ^ Brooks, Diane (February 16, 2000). "Bus-merge proposals die in committee". The Seattle Times. Retrieved September 28, 2014. 
  83. ^ Brooks, Diane (November 10, 1998). "Ref. 49 Vote Fuels Everett's Bus System -- Approval To Bring Additional Money For City-Operated Transit". The Seattle Times. Retrieved September 28, 2014. 
  84. ^ Brooks, Diane (June 15, 2000). "Everett now willing to entertain CT offer". The Seattle Times. Retrieved September 28, 2014. 
  85. ^ de Leon, John (January 3, 2001). "Join transit agencies to save, says study". The Seattle Times. Retrieved September 28, 2014. 
  86. ^ Ray, Susanna (July 20, 2002). "Community Transit touts savings in trimming Everett routes". The Herald (Everett, Washington: The Washington Post Company). p. A1. Retrieved September 28, 2014 – via ProQuest. (subscription required (help)). 
  87. ^ Tuinstra, Rachel (January 22, 2003). "Bus routes in line for changes countywide". The Seattle Times. Retrieved September 28, 2014. 
  88. ^ Ray, Susanna (July 19, 2002). "CT limits service in Everett". The Herald (Everett, Washington: The Washington Post Company). p. A1. Retrieved September 28, 2014 – via ProQuest. (subscription required (help)). 
  89. ^ "Community Transit, Everett Transit Become Partners" (Press release). Everett, Washington: Community Transit. December 5, 2007. Retrieved September 28, 2014. 
  90. ^ Brooks, Diane (December 12, 2007). "Community Transit, Everett form 17-mile partnership". The Seattle Times. Retrieved September 28, 2014. 
  91. ^ "Innovation meets efficiency for south Everett’s new median park-and-ride lot" (Press release). Seattle, Washington: Sound Transit. September 10, 2008. Retrieved September 28, 2014. 
  92. ^ Bergsman, Jerry (August 17, 1992). "CT Seeks More Clout In Planning". The Seattle Times. Retrieved September 27, 2014. 
  93. ^ Office of Corporate Communications Operations, Projects & Corporate Services (October 2007). "Sound Transit History and Chronology" (PDF). Sound Transit. Retrieved September 27, 2014. 
  94. ^ a b Consumer Price Index (estimate) 1800–2014. Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis. Retrieved February 27, 2014.
  95. ^ Crowley, Walt (September 24, 2000). "Voters in King, Snohomish, and Pierce counties reject regional transit plan on March 14, 1995.". HistoryLink. Retrieved September 27, 2014. 
  96. ^ Schaefer, David (March 16, 1995). "Voters Weren't Ready For Tax On Transit Plan -- Especially Since U. S. Helping Less". The Seattle Times. Retrieved September 27, 2014. 
  97. ^ "The Regional Transit System Proposal" (PDF). Central Puget Sound Regional Transit Authority. February 1995. pp. 9–10. Retrieved September 27, 2014. 
  98. ^ "Sound Move: Launching a Rapid Transit System for the Puget Sound Region" (PDF). Sound Transit. May 31, 1996. pp. 16, 20. Retrieved September 27, 2014. 
  99. ^ Schaefer, David (November 6, 1996). "Voters Back Transit Plan On Fourth Try". The Seattle Times. Retrieved September 27, 2014. 
  100. ^ ""Sound Transit" to be the Name for Regional Transit Authority Services" (Press release). Seattle, Washington: Sound Transit. August 15, 1997. Retrieved September 27, 2014. 
  101. ^ "Nine new ways to get around Puget Sound: Sound Transit to launch its first nine new ST Express regional bus routes" (Press release). Seattle, Washington: Sound Transit. September 8, 1999. Retrieved September 27, 2014. 
  102. ^ Whitely, Peyton (September 17, 1999). "Buses Ready To Roll". The Seattle Times. Retrieved September 27, 2014. 
  103. ^ "CT To Add Three Commuter Routes". The Seattle Times. January 26, 1999. Retrieved September 27, 2014. 
  104. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l (PDF) 2014–2019 Transit Development Plan (Report). Community Transit. May 1, 2014. http://www.commtrans.org/Projects/Documents/Community%20Transit%202014-2019%20TDP%20-Final.pdf. Retrieved September 1, 2014.
  105. ^ "Longtime Community Transit CEO Retiring" (Press release). Everett, Washington: Community Transit. July 3, 2014. Retrieved September 5, 2014. 
  106. ^ "Community Transit CEO to retire after 20 years". The Herald (Everett, Washington: Sound Publishing). July 3, 2014. Retrieved September 5, 2014. 
  107. ^ "Budget & Financial Information". Community Transit. July 11, 2014. Retrieved September 1, 2014. 
  108. ^ "CT's New Base Will Be Dedicated". The Seattle Times. June 30, 1997. Retrieved September 5, 2014. 
  109. ^ Kimpel, Thomas (September 27, 2013). "2013 Public Transportation Benefit Area Population Estimates" (PDF). Washington State Office of Financial Management. Retrieved September 1, 2014. 
  110. ^ a b c "Swift bus rapid transit". Community Transit. Retrieved September 1, 2014. 
  111. ^ "Bus Service Direct to Boeing". Community Transit. Retrieved September 1, 2014. 
  112. ^ "Take Transit Downtown". Community Transit. Archived from the original on March 15, 2014. Retrieved September 1, 2014. 
  113. ^ "Bus Service to the U-District". Community Transit. Retrieved September 1, 2014. 
  114. ^ Community Transit Bus Plus: Schedules & Route Maps (PDF) (September 2014 ed.). Community Transit. September 29, 2014. Retrieved September 29, 2014. 
  115. ^ Ride the Wave Transit Guide (PDF) (June–September 2014 ed.). Sound Transit. June 8, 2014. pp. 43–56. Retrieved September 1, 2014. 
  116. ^ "Community Transit Increases Local Service" (Press release). Everett, Washington: Community Transit. February 3, 2005. Retrieved September 29, 2014. 
  117. ^ "Transit Centers & Parking". Community Transit. Retrieved September 5, 2014. 
  118. ^ a b "Bikes and Buses". Community Transit. Retrieved September 3, 2014. 
  119. ^ Elridge, Mark, ed. (Fall 2013). "Puget Sound Park and Ride Inventory" (PDF). Washington State Department of Transportation. Retrieved September 5, 2014. 
  120. ^ "Vanpool Program". Community Transit. Retrieved September 1, 2014. 
  121. ^ Jones, Marjorie (October 3, 1981). "Loss of bus shuts out senior-center regulars". The Seattle Times. p. A11. 
  122. ^ a b "Disability & Accessibility". Community Transit. Retrieved September 1, 2014. 
  123. ^ a b c d "Fares & Passes". Community Transit. Retrieved September 1, 2014. 
  124. ^ a b "Fares Will Increase on Feb. 1" (Press release). Everett, Washington: Community Transit. January 17, 2013. Retrieved September 1, 2014. 
  125. ^ "ORCA Smart Card Limited Rollout Underway". Everett, Washington: Community Transit. April 21, 2009. Retrieved September 1, 2014. 
  126. ^ "ORCA Smart Card: ORCA Saves Time and Money". Community Transit. Retrieved September 1, 2014. 
  127. ^ "No-Fee ORCA Card Promotion Extended One Month". Everett, Washington: Community Transit. January 15, 2010. Retrieved September 1, 2014. 
  128. ^ "No More Paper Transfers Starting Jan. 1". Rider Alerts (Community Transit). December 18, 2009. Retrieved September 1, 2014. 
  129. ^ "CT Improvements Assist Disabled". The Seattle Times. March 7, 1995. Retrieved September 3, 2014. 
  130. ^ "Mobility Devices on Public Transportation" (PDF). Community Transit. 2012. Retrieved September 3, 2014. 
  131. ^ "Bicycle Racks Available On CT Buses". The Seattle Times. January 2, 1996. Retrieved September 7, 2014. 
  132. ^ "Gear Up for Bike to Work Day" (Press release). Everett, Washington: Community Transit. April 26, 2006. Retrieved September 3, 2014. 
  133. ^ "Van GO Grants Keep Our Community Moving". Community Transit. Retrieved September 3, 2014. 
  134. ^ Sheets, Bill (March 22, 2010). "Community Transits offers surplus vans to nonprofit groups". The Herald (Everett, Washington: The Washington Post Company). Retrieved September 3, 2014. 
  135. ^ "Community Transit to Award Surplus Vans to Non-Profits" (Press release). Everett, Washington: Community Transit. August 8, 2014. Retrieved September 3, 2014. 
  136. ^ Hinshaw, Mark (October 12, 2011). "Double-tall buses: sitting pretty". Crosscut.com. Retrieved September 1, 2014. 
  137. ^ "Double Decker in Service" (Press release). Everett, Washington: Community Transit. July 31, 2007. Retrieved September 1, 2014. 
  138. ^ Velush, Lukas (July 30, 2007). "Commute like the British do: on a double-decker bus". The Herald (Everett, Washington: The Washington Post Company). Retrieved September 1, 2014. 
  139. ^ a b "Double Tall Buses: Double Decker Buses Perk Up the Fleet". Community Transit. June 10, 2014. Retrieved September 1, 2014. 
  140. ^ Sheets, Bill (April 1, 2008). "Community Transit to add fleet of double-decker buses". The Herald (Everett, Washington: The Washington Post Company). Retrieved September 1, 2014. 
  141. ^ Siderius, Christina (April 9, 2008). "Double-tall buses to help ease traffic congestion". The Seattle Times. Retrieved September 1, 2014. 
  142. ^ "Double Talls Return to Service" (Press release). Everett, Washington: Community Transit. March 31, 2011. Retrieved September 1, 2014. 
  143. ^ Salyer, Sharon (April 1, 2011). "Community Transit rolls out the double-deckers". The Herald (Everett, Washington: The Washington Post Company). Retrieved September 1, 2014. 
  144. ^ a b "Another Double Tall, Please!" (Press release). Everett, Washington: Community Transit. July 31, 2013. Retrieved September 1, 2014. 
  145. ^ "Community Transit ready to order up double-decker buses". The Herald (Everett, Washington: Sound Publishing). August 1, 2013. Retrieved September 1, 2014. 
  146. ^ Lindblom, Mike (July 31, 2013). "Community Transit adding 17 double-decker buses". The Seattle Times. Retrieved September 1, 2014. 
  147. ^ "Ride tall: Sound Transit to purchase new double-decker transit buses" (Press release). Seattle, Washington: Sound Transit. March 27, 2014. Retrieved September 1, 2014. 
  148. ^ Lindblom, Mike (March 25, 2014). "Sound Transit to add double-decker buses in 2015". The Seattle Times. Retrieved September 1, 2014. 

External links[edit]