Competition Act

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The Competition Act (also known as C-34) is a Canadian federal law governing most business conduct.

The Act contains both criminal and civil provisions aimed at preventing anti-competitive practices in the marketplace.

Its purpose is to maintain and encourage competition in Canada.

The Competition Act[edit]

In Canada, the Competition Act[1] is a federal law governing most business conduct in Canada. It contains both criminal and civil provisions aimed at preventing anti-competitive practices in the marketplace.

Its purpose is to maintain and encourage competition in Canada in order to:

    • promote the efficiency and adaptability of the Canadian economy
    • expand opportunities for Canadian participation in world markets while at the same time recognizing the role of foreign competition in Canada
    • ensure that small and medium-sized enterprises have an equitable opportunity to participate in the Canadian economy
    • provide consumers with competitive prices and product choices.

The administration and enforcement of the Competition Act is done by the Competition Bureau [2] which is also responsible for the administration and enforcement of the Consumer Packaging and Labelling Act, the Textile Labelling Act and the Precious Metals Marking Act.

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