Concordville, Pennsylvania

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Concordville Historic District
ConcordOrthodoxFriends.JPG
Orthodox Friends Meetinghouse
Concordville, Pennsylvania is located in Pennsylvania
Concordville, Pennsylvania
Location Concord Rd. and Baltimore Pike, Concordville, Pennsylvania
Coordinates 39°53′9″N 75°31′15″W / 39.88583°N 75.52083°W / 39.88583; -75.52083Coordinates: 39°53′9″N 75°31′15″W / 39.88583°N 75.52083°W / 39.88583; -75.52083
Area 14 acres (5.7 ha)
Built 1728
Governing body Private
NRHP Reference # 73001624[1]
Added to NRHP April 03, 1973

Concordville is an unincorporated community in Concord Township, Delaware County, Pennsylvania, United States. It is located 20 miles west-southwest of Philadelphia, at the junction of U.S. Routes 1 and 322. This intersection can be traced back to two of the earliest roads in Pennsylvania, Baltimore Pike which became U.S. 1, and Concord Pike, which connected Pennsylvania with Delaware.[2]

The first European settlement in the area occurred about 1700, after Quakers bought land from William Penn. Two Friends Meetinghouses (formerly Orthodox and Hicksite) are located in the village. The Orthodox meetinghouse was built in the first half of the nineteenth century, while the Hicksites retained the original meetinghouse (built 1728, reconstructed and expanded 1788). The two factions have since merged and now meet in the original meetinghouse. Part of the village was added to the National Register in 1973.[3]

Glen Mills Schools, a juvenile residential facility, is near Concordville.[4]

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References[edit]

  1. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2009-03-13. 
  2. ^ Concord Township Historical Commission
  3. ^ Pennsylvania Register of Historic Sites and Landmarks, May 1972, NRHP Nomination Form for Concordville Historic District Enter "public" for ID and "public" for password to access the site.
  4. ^ "A Place for Hard Foster Care Cases." (Opinion) The New York Times. January 29, 1990. 1. Retrieved on September 7, 2011.