Condon, Oregon

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Condon, Oregon
City
Location in Oregon
Location in Oregon
Coordinates: 45°14′8″N 120°11′6″W / 45.23556°N 120.18500°W / 45.23556; -120.18500Coordinates: 45°14′8″N 120°11′6″W / 45.23556°N 120.18500°W / 45.23556; -120.18500
Country United States
State Oregon
County Gilliam
Incorporated 1893
Government
 • Mayor N. Dale Thompson[1]
Area[2]
 • Total 0.83 sq mi (2.15 km2)
 • Land 0.83 sq mi (2.15 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation 2,831 ft (863 m)
Population (2010)[3]
 • Total 682
 • Estimate (2012[4]) 712
 • Density 821.7/sq mi (317.3/km2)
Time zone Pacific (UTC-8)
 • Summer (DST) Pacific (UTC-7)
ZIP code 97823
Area code(s) 458 and 541
FIPS code 41-15000[3]
GNIS feature ID 1119195[5]
Website

www.cityofcondon.com

Condon Commercial Historic District
Photo of three historic commercial buildings.
The IOOF Hall, J.F. Reisacher Building, and Bank Block (left to right) in 2012.
Location Downtown Condon, Oregon
Area 9.95 acres (4.03 ha)
Governing body various
NRHP Reference # 98000609 (original)
01000493 (increase)
Significant dates
Added to NRHP May 29, 1998
Boundary increase May 16, 2001

Condon is a city in, and the county seat of, Gilliam County, in the U.S. state of Oregon.[6] The population was 682 at the 2010 census.[7] The city, with an historic main street along Oregon Route 19, is a farming and ranching community.

History[edit]

Condon was the southern terminus of the Condon Branch of the Union Pacific Railroad.[8] In 1883, a local homesteader named Potter platted the land around a spring on his property.[8] The spring, which emerged from a bed of black basalt, was known to pioneer ranchers in the area as Summit Springs.[9] Experiencing financial difficulty, Potter surrendered the site to the legal firm Condon and Cornish from Arlington.[8] Harvey C. Condon, a member of the firm, was a nephew of Oregon geologist Thomas Condon.[8] Condon and Cornish sold lots in the townsite and in 1884, resident David B. Trimble applied for a post office and became its first postmaster.[8] He named the post office Condon after Harvey C. Condon.[8]

Condon Air Force Station was a radar station near the city[8] that operated from 1951 to 1970.

Condon Commercial Historic District[edit]

In 1998, Condon's historic downtown core along Main Street was listed on the National Register of Historic Places as the Condon Commercial Historic District.[10] The City of Condon is collaborating with business interests to "spruce up" buildings on Main Street.[11]

Geography and climate[edit]

Condon, in Gilliam County in north-central Oregon, is at the intersection of Oregon Route 19, running north–south through the city, and Oregon Route 206, which runs east–west at Condon.[12] By highway, the city is 38 miles (61 km) south of Interstate 84 at Arlington, 69 miles (111 km) southeast of The Dalles, and 150 miles (240 km) east of Portland.[13]

The city is 2,831 feet (863 m) above sea level.[5] According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 0.83 square miles (2.15 km2), all of it land.[2]

Climate data for Condon, Oregon (1981–2010)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °F (°C) 39.1
(3.9)
43.2
(6.2)
51.0
(10.6)
57.4
(14.1)
65.5
(18.6)
72.8
(22.7)
82.6
(28.1)
82.1
(27.8)
73.2
(22.9)
60.8
(16)
46.3
(7.9)
37.3
(2.9)
59.3
(15.2)
Average low °F (°C) 25.1
(−3.8)
26.4
(−3.1)
30.4
(−0.9)
33.8
(1)
39.9
(4.4)
45.2
(7.3)
50.7
(10.4)
50.3
(10.2)
43.8
(6.6)
35.8
(2.1)
29.4
(−1.4)
23.1
(−4.9)
36.2
(2.3)
Precipitation inches (mm) 1.63
(41.4)
1.25
(31.8)
1.28
(32.5)
1.38
(35.1)
1.60
(40.6)
1.08
(27.4)
0.46
(11.7)
0.43
(10.9)
0.57
(14.5)
1.08
(27.4)
1.69
(42.9)
1.78
(45.2)
14.21
(360.9)
Snowfall inches (cm) 5.8
(14.7)
5.1
(13)
2.0
(5.1)
0.8
(2)
0.0
(0)
0.0
(0)
0.0
(0)
0.0
(0)
0.0
(0)
0.4
(1)
3.0
(7.6)
7.2
(18.3)
24.2
(61.5)
Source: NOAA[14]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1890 60
1900 230 283.3%
1910 1,009 338.7%
1920 1,127 11.7%
1930 940 −16.6%
1940 856 −8.9%
1950 968 13.1%
1960 1,149 18.7%
1970 973 −15.3%
1980 783 −19.5%
1990 635 −18.9%
2000 759 19.5%
2010 682 −10.1%
source:[3][15]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census of 2010, there were 682 people, 357 households, and 184 families residing in the city. The population density was 821.7 inhabitants per square mile (317.3 /km2). There were 455 housing units at an average density of 548.2 per square mile (211.7 /km2). The racial makeup of the city was 97.2% White, 0.1% African American, 0.9% Native American, 0.1% Asian, 0.9% from other races, and 0.7% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.1% of the population.[3]

There were 357 households of which 16.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 42.3% were married couples living together, 5.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 3.6% had a male householder with no wife present, and 48.5% were non-families. 45.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 24.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 1.85 and the average family size was 2.54.[3]

The median age in the city was 54.5 years. 14.7% of residents were under the age of 18; 3.7% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 15.4% were from 25 to 44; 34.7% were from 45 to 64; and 31.7% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 46.6% male and 53.4% female.[3]

2000 census[edit]

As of the census of 2000, there were 759 people, 343 households, and 215 families residing in the city. The population density was 887.3 people per square mile (340.8/km²). There were 413 housing units at an average density of 482.8 per square mile (185.4/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 97.50% White, 0.40% African American, 0.79% Native American, 0.26% Asian, 0.13% from other races, and 0.92% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.53% of the population.[3]

There were 343 households out of which 22.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.9% were married couples living together, 6.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 37.3% were non-families. 34.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 17.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.14 and the average family size was 2.72.[3]

In the city the population was spread out with 19.6% under the age of 18, 4.0% from 18 to 24, 21.9% from 25 to 44, 26.6% from 45 to 64, and 27.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 48 years. For every 100 females there were 95.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.3 males.[3]

The median income for a household in the city was $32,667, and the median income for a family was $40,000. Males had a median income of $30,500 versus $21,042 for females. The per capita income for the city was $18,481. About 3.6% of families and 5.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.1% of those under age 18 and 5.1% of those age 65 or over.[3]

Arts and culture[edit]

Condon hosts special events throughout the year including Robert Burns Day in January, the Tumbleweed Basketball Tournament in March, the Fabulous 4th of July, and the Fall Festival in November.[16]

The Gilliam County Historical Museum complex at Burns Park along Route 19 includes several restored buildings, including a train depot, caboose, church, barber shop, jail, school house, and the Silas A. Rice Log House, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.[17]

Condon has a farmers market, golf course, swimming pool, and movie theater, and a game-bird reserve and recreational ranches are nearby.[18]

Education and economy[edit]

Condon students are served by the Condon School District, which includes Condon Elementary School and Condon High School.

The five largest employers in Condon as of 2002 were the Gilliam County government, the Condon School District, the North-Central Education Service District, the Hotel Condon, and Summit Springs Village, an assisted living center.[13]

Media[edit]

The Times-Journal is a weekly newspaper published in Condon.[19]

Transportation[edit]

The state airport in Condon is named Pauling Field after former resident Linus Pauling.

Notable people[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Incorporated Cities: Condon". Oregon Blue Book. Oregon Secretary of State. 2013. Retrieved 2013-08-17. 
  2. ^ a b "U.S. Gazetteer: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-08-17. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "American FactFinder". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-08-17. 
  4. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-06-02. 
  5. ^ a b "Condon". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. November 28, 1980. Retrieved 2013-08-17. 
  6. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  7. ^ "2010 Census data: Oregon cities alphabetically A-C" (PDF). Portland State University Population Research Center. Retrieved 2011-12-27. 
  8. ^ a b c d e f g McArthur, Lewis A.; McArthur, Lewis L. (2003) [First published 1928]. Oregon Geographic Names (7th ed.). Portland, Oregon: Oregon Historical Society Press. p. 224. ISBN 9780875952772. OCLC 53075956. 
  9. ^ Shaver, F. A., et al. (1905). An Illustrated History of Central Oregon Embracing Wasco, Sherman, Gilliam, Wheeler, Crook, Lake and Klamath Counties. Spokane, Washington: Western Publishing Co. pp. 568–71. OCLC 5436491. 
  10. ^ Donovan, Sally (July 1997). "National Register of Historic Places Registration Form: Condon Commercial Historic District" (PDF). National Park Service. Retrieved 2012-08-12. 
  11. ^ "Welcome to the City of Condon". City of Condon. 2013. Retrieved 2013-08-17. 
  12. ^ Oregon Atlas & Gazetteer (7th ed.). Yarmouth, Maine: DeLorme. 2008. p. 72. ISBN 978-0-89933-347-2. 
  13. ^ a b Infrastructure Finance Authority (2009). "Condon Community Profile". Business Oregon. Retrieved 2013-08-17. 
  14. ^ "NOWData - NOAA Online Weather Data". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved 2013-05-05. 
  15. ^ Moffatt, Riley Moore (1996). Population History of Western U.S. Cities and Towns, 1850–1990. Lanham, Maryland: Scarecrow Press. p. 208. ISBN 978-0-8108-3033-2. 
  16. ^ "Special Events". Condon Chamber of Commerce. Retrieved 2013-08-17. 
  17. ^ "Gilliam County Historical Society". Condon Chamber of Commerce. Retrieved 2013-08-17. 
  18. ^ "Activities". Condon Chamber of Commerce. Retrieved 2013-08-17. 
  19. ^ "The Times Journal". Condon Chamber of Commerce. Retrieved 2013-08-17. 
  20. ^ "Gilliam County, Oregon Genealogy & History". Retrieved 2011-10-27. 

External links[edit]