Conewango Creek

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For other uses, see Conewango (disambiguation).
Conewango Creek
Origin 42°16′51″N 78°51′25″W / 42.2808333°N 78.8569444°W / 42.2808333; -78.8569444
Mouth 41°50′28″N 79°08′43″W / 41.8411708°N 79.1453223°W / 41.8411708; -79.1453223
Basin countries United States
Mouth elevation 1181 feet (360 meters)
River system Allegheny River

Conewango Creek is a 71-mile-long (114 km)[1] tributary of the Allegheny River in Pennsylvania and western New York in the United States.[2]

The creek's drainage covers much of southeastern Chautauqua County, New York and southwestern Cattaraugus County, New York. The creek's most notable tributary is the Chadakoin River, which supplies the creek water from Chautauqua Lake. Its watershed is bounded by the Chautauqua Ridge, a continental divide.

Course[edit]

Conewango creek meets Allegheny River; in Warren, PA.

Conewango Creek joins the Allegheny River at the city of Warren, Pennsylvania.

River modifications[edit]

On September 26, 2009 an obsolete Civil War-era low head dam within the city of Warren on the Conewango Creek was removed. Removal of this dam will allow fish migration from the Allegheny River throughout the upper reaches of the Conewango Creek drainage basin. [3]

From Monday, August 25 through Thursday, September 4, 2014 two Civil War-era remnant dams on the Conewango Creek in North Warren, Pennsylvania were removed. One dam was a partially breached low head dam similar to the dam that was removed downriver in Warren in 2009. Because it was located in close proximity to the Warren State Hospital, and used to provide a water supply to that facility in years past, this dam was known as the Hospital Dam. The second dam was a remnant rock and crib dam located immediately upriver of the first. With the removal of the Carter Dam in the autumn of 2009, and the hospital dams in 2014, 27 miles of the Conewango Creek mainstream have been completely opened up to make the Conewango's watershed that much more ecologically sound. There are now no dams from where the river confluences with the Allegheny River all the way up into New York State. Removing the dam was a public safety service, and will reconnect most of the Conewango Creek for freshwater mussel host species.[4][5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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