Coney Island – Stillwell Avenue (New York City Subway)

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Coney Island – Stillwell Avenue
NYCS D NYCS F NYCS N NYCS Q
New York City Subway rapid transit station
Coney Island Stillwell Station by David Shankbone.JPG
Station building as seen from Surf Avenue
Station statistics
Address Stillwell Avenue & Surf Avenue
Brooklyn, NY 11224
Borough Brooklyn
Locale Coney Island
Coordinates 40°34′38.43″N 73°58′52.10″W / 40.5773417°N 73.9811389°W / 40.5773417; -73.9811389Coordinates: 40°34′38.43″N 73°58′52.10″W / 40.5773417°N 73.9811389°W / 40.5773417; -73.9811389
Division B (BMT/IND)
Line BMT Brighton Line
IND Culver Line
BMT Sea Beach Line
BMT West End Line
Services       D all times (all times)
      F all times (all times)
      N all times (all times)
      Q all times (all times)
Connection
Structure Elevated
Platforms 4 island platforms
Tracks 8
Other information
Opened December 23, 1918; 96 years ago (1918-12-23)
     (Sea Beach & West End)
May 29, 1919; 95 years ago (1919-05-29)
     (Brighton; formal opening)
May 1, 1920; 94 years ago (1920-05-01)
     (Culver)
Rebuilt May 23, 2004; 10 years ago (2004-05-23)[1]
Accessible Handicapped/disabled access
Former/other names Coney Island Terminal
Traffic
Passengers (2013) 4,690,794 [2] Decrease 0.9%
Rank 102 out of 421
Station succession
Next north West Eighth Street – New York Aquarium (Brighton/Culver): F all times Q all times
86th Street (Sea Beach local): N all times
59th Street (Sea Beach express): no regular service
Bay 50th Street (West End local): D all times
Bay Parkway (West End express): no regular service
Next south (Terminal): D all times F all times N all times Q all times


Next Handicapped/disabled access north Kings Highway (via Brighton): Q all times
Church Avenue (via Culver): F all times
Atlantic Avenue – Barclays Center (via Sea Beach): N all times
Bay Parkway (via West End): D all times
Next Handicapped/disabled access south none: D all times F all times N all times Q all times

Coney Island – Stillwell Avenue (also known as Coney Island Terminal) is a major rapid transit station in Coney Island, Brooklyn, serving as the terminal for four New York City Subway services. It is one of the world's largest above-ground terminal facilities (in fact, it is the world's largest elevated'rail terminal), and is the most energy-efficient mass transit facility in the United States. This large facility was designed at a time when Coney Island was the primary summer resort area for the New York region, with all of the rail lines in southern Brooklyn funneling service to the area.

The station is located at the corner of Stillwell and Surf Avenues in Coney Island, the site of the former West End Terminal; it is the southernmost terminal in the New York City Subway (but not the southernmost terminal in the entire New York City Transit system, as that honor is claimed by the Tottenville station of the Staten Island Railway). It has eight tracks and four island platforms, with trains entering from both compass north and south; however, it serves as the railroad-south terminal for all D, F, N and Q trains.

Nearby, tracks from both the BMT West End Line and BMT Sea Beach Line lead into Coney Island Yard.

The terminal is the new home of Transit District 34 of the New York City Police Department.

History[edit]

In 1919, a completely reconstructed New West End Terminal was built on an elevated structure to consolidate the terminals of all the former steam railroad lines terminating at Coney Island except the Long Island Rail Road-controlled New York and Manhattan Beach Railway. "West End" was gradually dropped from the terminal's name, and it is now known as Stillwell Avenue Terminal or Coney Island Terminal. Station signage reads Stillwell Avenue – Coney Island.

A City Planning Commission report in 1979 recommended that free bus to subway transfers be implemented for passengers in Coney Island. Free transfers between the B36 and B74 bus routes to and from Coney Island – Stillwell Avenue station were proposed. It was noted that the station was the only one in New York City that once had direct rapid transit service in a single zone which didn't get free bus to subway transfers when service was discontinued (in sharp contrast to the BMT Culver Line, BMT Myrtle Avenue Line, and IRT Third Avenue Line, which were discontinued and replaced by bus transfers). The free transfers would stimulate full occupancy in the $200 million worth of government subsidized, recently constructed apartments, and would help integrate Mark Twain Junior High School and attract a stable middle class.[3]

By 1980, the entire system was in a state of disrepair, and the Coney Island Terminal was no exception. It was slated to be rebuilt that year. The Daily News stated that the terminal would emerge "with a bright, new airy look" and would be one of the first stations in the system to benefit from continuously welded rail.[4]

Construction did not start until November 2001, and Coney Island Terminal was entirely reconstructed, with the new terminal opening May 23, 2004 with 6 tracks. The project completed on May 29, 2005, with full restoration of N service and all eight tracks in service. A new entrance building was constructed, with a terra cotta facade in imitation of the former terminal, including restored BMT signs and logos. The former steel and concrete station, badly corroded by the effects of salt water and poor maintenance, was replaced with a new infrastructure, including a soaring roof with arches reminiscent of grand European railway stations such as the Gare Saint-Lazare. The roof is glazed with photovoltaic (solar electric) panels, consisting of 2,800 thin-film modules from Schott AG and covering a surface of 76,000 square feet (7,100 m2). The solar panel system has a nominal power of about 210 kWp, which generates an annual output of 250,000 kW hours, which the station can use to offset power needs. It is the largest renewable-energy enabled mass transit station in the United States. The main terminal and canopy was built by a joint venture between Granite Halmar Construction and Schiavone Construction. The Portal Building was built by Vertex Engineering Services.[5]

In May 2010, the station received new electronic train departure boards for each platform.

Station layout[edit]

3F - Crossover between platforms
2F
Platform level
Track 1 NYCS N toward Astoria – Ditmars Boulevard via Sea Beach (86th Street)
(No service: 59th Street)
Island platform, doors will open on the left, right Handicapped/disabled access
Track 2 NYCS N toward Astoria – Ditmars Boulevard via Sea Beach (86th Street)
(No service: 59th Street)
Track 3 NYCS Q toward Astoria – Ditmars Boulevard (weekdays), toward 57th Street – Seventh Avenue (weekends) via Brighton (West Eighth Street – New York Aquarium)
Island platform, doors will open on the left, right Handicapped/disabled access
Track 4 NYCS Q toward Astoria – Ditmars Boulevard (weekdays), toward 57th Street – Seventh Avenue (weekends) via Brighton (West Eighth Street – New York Aquarium)
Track 5 NYCS F toward Jamaica – 179th Street (West Eighth Street – New York Aquarium)
Island platform, doors will open on the left, right Handicapped/disabled access
Track 6 NYCS F toward Jamaica – 179th Street (West Eighth Street – New York Aquarium)
Track 7 NYCS D toward Norwood – 205th Street (Bay 50th Street)
(No service: Bay Parkway)
Island platform, doors will open on the left, right Handicapped/disabled access
Track 8 NYCS D toward Norwood – 205th Street (Bay 50th Street)
(No service: Bay Parkway)
1F Mezzanine to entrances/exits, station agent, MetroCard vending machines
Handicapped/disabled access (Elevator in station house at NE corner of at Surf Avenue and Stillwell Avenue)
G Street Level Entrances/Exits, station house

The station has eight tracks and four island platforms, under a roof covered with solar panels. Tracks 1–4 are slightly higher than tracks 5–8 at the station's south end.

Services[edit]

The track configuration around Stillwell Avenue
Bay 50th Street (BMT West End Line) 86th Street (BMT Sea Beach Line)
North of the station
BMT West End Line local
      D all times (all times)
BMT Sea Beach Line local
      N all times (all times)
In the station
tracks 7 and 8
      D all times (all times)
tracks 5 and 6
      F all times (all times)
tracks 3 and 4
      Q all times (all times)
tracks 1 and 2
      N all times (all times)
East of the station
lower level upper level
IND Culver Line local
      F all times (all times)
BMT Brighton Line local
      Q all times (all times)
West Eighth Street – New York Aquarium
(IND Culver Line)
West Eighth Street – New York Aquarium
(BMT Brighton Line)

While labeled a terminal, all of the tracks, with the exception of the West End line tracks, could provide through service in either direction. Only the West End line tracks end at bumper blocks at their south end. The station has been used as a terminal for most of its history, but at least two through services have been offered:

In 2006, through service was offered during several weekends while track maintenance shut down portions of the BMT Brighton Line north of Kings Highway.

Bus terminal[edit]

Located underneath the subway station terminal and on Stillwell Avenue and Mermaid Avenue bus terminal, four New York City Bus lines served in this terminal provide easier transfer to the subway and bus connections. One additional bus line is located near the station complex.

Lane Route Terminus
North side B68 Windsor Terrace
Bartel Pritchard Square
B82
Local and
Limited-stops
Starrett City
Pennsylvania Avenue and Seaview Avenue
Station entrance B74 Sea Gate
West 37th Street and Mermaid Avenue
Drop-off only
Stillwell Avenue
and Mermaid Avenue
(Western side)
B64 Bay Ridge
Shore Road and 71st Street
Stillwell Avenue
and Surf Avenue
B36 Westbound:
Sea Gate
West 37th Street and Surf Avenue
Eastbound:
Sheepshead Bay
Avenue U and Nostrand Avenue

Subway–bus transfer coordination[edit]

To reduce missed connections and waiting time between the B36 and B82 bus routes and Q train, New York City Transit began operating yellow holding lights to signal bus operators to wait for imminently arriving trains. The lights, which began operating March 10, 2014, are on the northeast corner of Surf and Stillwell Avenues and in the Mermaid Avenue Bus Loop.[6] The system operates from 11:00 P.M. to 5:00 A.M. daily.

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

External images
The station in 1991
  1. ^ Matus, Paul. "The New BMT Coney Island Terminal". The Third Rail Online. Retrieved 2007-08-29. 
  2. ^ "Facts and Figures: Annual Subway Ridership". New York City Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Retrieved 2014-03-26. 
  3. ^ The Bulletin, New York Division Electric Railroaders' Association, January 1987, page 5.
  4. ^ nycsubway.org—The Diamond Jubilee Brings Optimism
  5. ^ Chan, Sewell. "And Now for the Good News From the Subway System". The New York Times. Retrieved 2013-10-16. 
  6. ^ "Holding the Bus for Trains at Coney Island". Metropolitan Transportation Authority. March 7, 2014. 

External links[edit]