Confluence

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Confluence of rivers, the Mosel flows into the Rhine at Koblenz. The name "Koblenz" itself has its origin in the Latin name "Confluentes"
Confluence of the Bhagirathi and Alaknanda Rivers to produce the Ganges at Devprayag, India. Note the swirl of sediment from the Alaknanda.
Confluence of the Danube (light blue) and the Morava (dark blue) in Devín on the border between Austria and Slovakia.
Confluence of canals
This simplified diagram shows how a section of the Industrial Canal in New Orleans also serves as the channel for the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway and the Mississippi River-Gulf Outlet Canal. At the bottom, a portion of the Intracoastal is also shown to be "confluent" with the Mississippi River.
The confluence of the Rio Negro (black) and the Rio Solimões (turbid) near Manaus, Brazil.

In geography, a confluence is the meeting of two or more bodies of water. Also known as a conflux,[1] it refers either to the point where a tributary joins a larger river, called the main stem, or where two streams meet to become the source of a river of a new name, such as the confluence of the Monongahela and Allegheny rivers in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania creating the Ohio River.

The term is also used to describe the meeting of tidal or other non-riverine bodies of water, such as two canals[2] or a canal and a lake.[3] A one-mile (1.6 km) portion of the Industrial Canal in New Orleans accommodates the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway and the Mississippi River-Gulf Outlet Canal; therefore those three waterways are confluent there.

Notable confluences[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/conflux
  2. ^ The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers refers to the confluence of the Assawoman Canal with the Bethany Loop Canal in Delaware. See: "CENAP-OP-R-Quarterly Report, 2004-05-12". Philadelphia Engineer District. Retrieved 2006-03-11. 
  3. ^ Engineers in New Orleans refer to the confluence of the 17th Street Canal and Lake Pontchartrain. See: "Interim Closure Structure at 17th St. Canal". Task Force Guardian. Archived from the original on 2006-06-25. Retrieved 2006-03-11. 
  4. ^ Kogovšek, Janja; Petrič, Metka; Zupan Hajna, Nadja; Pipan, Tanja. "Planinska jama" [Planina Cave]. In Šmid Hribar, Mateja; Golež, Gregor; Podjed, Dan; Kladnik, Drago; Erhartič, Bojan; Pavlin, Primož; Ines, Jerele. Enciklopedija naravne in kulturne dediščine na Slovenskem [Encyclopedia of Natural and Cultural Heritage in Slovenia] (in Slovene). Retrieved 17 May 2012.