Congressional canvass for the Philippine presidential election, 2010

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Canvassed provinces and cities for the presidential election.
Canvassed provinces and cities for the vice presidential election. Loren Legarda and Bayani Fernando, despite having more votes than Edu Manzano, failed to win in any province or city where COCs had been canvassed.
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The following is the official canvassing of votes by the Congress of the Philippines for the 2010 Philippine presidential and vice presidential election. The canvassing, originally scheduled to start on May 31, started on May 24, 2010, and ended on June 9, 2010. Congress is mandated to declare a winner 30 days after the elections (June 9).[1]

Process[edit]

After voters had finished voting, the counting machines will then count the votes received by each candidate in each position. For positions elected on a national basis (president, vice president, senators and party-list representatives), the counting machine will then print an election return for that precinct, and will transmit the results to the municipal/city board of canvassers, Congress, Commission on Elections, the citizen's arm authorized by the commission, political parties, and others.

The city or municipality will then tally the votes for all positions and will issue two documents at its conclusion: a statement of votes where the votes obtained by candidates in each precinct in a city/municipality is stated; and a certificate of canvass (COC), a document in electronic and printed form containing the total votes in figures obtained by each candidate in the city or municipality. The city or municipal COC will either be sent electronically to Congress (if the city is an Independent city with its own legislative district) or to the provincial board of canvassers in which the process is repeated; this time the provincial COC will be sent to Congress.

Congress, seating as the National Board of Canvassers, will canvass the votes to determine who among the candidates are elected president and vice president.[2]

In theory, all of the votes from the election returns when added must be equal to the votes canvassed by Congress coming from the city/provincial COCs.

Members of the canvassing committee[edit]

Instead of the whole Congress canvassing the votes, a committee comprised evenly between the Senate and the House of Representatives will canvass the votes at the Batasang Pambansa Complex in Quezon City, the home of the House of Representatives. The Senate President and the Speaker will co-chair the proceedings; previously, the majority leaders of both houses played this role.[3] House Speaker Prospero Nograles announced the composition of the House delegation on May 21,[3] as Senate Majority Floor Leader Juan Miguel Zubiri announced theirs on May 24.[4]

Senate Position House of Representatives
Senate President Juan Ponce Enrile (PMP) Co-chairpersons House Speaker Prospero Nograles (Davao City, Lakas Kampi CMD)
Members
Alternates

Members of Congress who ran for president (Noynoy Aquino, Richard Gordon, Jamby Madrigal, and Manny Villar) and vice president (Loren Legarda and Mar Roxas) are banned from attending the proceedings. Senators Miriam Defensor Santiago and Francis Escudero inhibited themselves for actively supporting candidates for president and vice president (Defensor Santiago herself was a guest senatorial candidate of four parties), while Estrada, who also inhibited himself, will only sit to provide quorum.

Each political party is entitled to two lawyers who may file motions before Congress.

Proceedings[edit]

Date Scheduled
start
Actual
start
Ended COCs
canvassed
May 25[5] 2:00 p.m. 2:52 p.m. 5:09 p.m. 0
May 26[6] 2:00 p.m. 2:44 p.m. 8:45 p.m. 0
May 27 1:00 p.m.[6] 1:55 p.m.[7] 8:45 p.m.[8] 5
May 28 1:00 p.m.[9] 8:50 p.m.[10] 126
May 31 1:00 p.m. 4:00 p.m. 10:10 p.m.[11] 9
June 1 1:00 p.m.[11] 8:31 p.m. 63
June 2 1:00 p.m.[12] 1:40 p.m.[13] 18
June 3 1:00 p.m. 8:58 p.m. 25
June 7 1:00 p.m. 9:13 p.m. 4
June 8 1:00 p.m. 2:48 p.m. 1
June 9 2:00 p.m. N/A

May 25–28[edit]

On May 25, while the Senate approved the rules governing the proceedings quickly, House members took an hour to approve the rules. Joel Villanueva of CIBAC party-list predicted that once the certificates of canvass from the incumbent Congressman was defeated will be checked, "expect these defeated lawmakers to raise hell." Speaker Nograles, himself beaten in the Davao City mayoralty election (he is term-limited to run for congressman this election), assured that the new president and vice president will be proclaimed simultaneously. Congress adjourned after approval of the rules and will reconvene on the afternoon of May 26.[14]

On May 26, all Commission on Elections commissioners, Smartmatic executives and information technology experts where present before the joint canvassing committee. The Congressmen asked the commissioners on the matter of "two" separate certificates of canvass (COC) for the positions of president and vice president. Dilangalen remarked that in the 2004 election, there was only one COC for both positions; Commissioner Larrazabal replied that each COC, although printed in several pages, is one document, with Chairman Jose Melo adding that there is a separate COC per position per province. Arthur Defensor asked if this meant Congress should canvass the COCs separately, with Nograles replying that will be up for the canvassing committee to decide that. Other issues tackled the lack of digital signatures in the election returns, and the erroneous number of registered voters in the Smartmatic database ("256, 733, 195") when Enrile opened the server. Smartmatic president for Asia-Pacific Cesar Flores replied to Enrile that the erroneous figure was an error in the application "that was adding the number of registered voters from the PCOS [machines] from the precinct level and it was adding the number of registered voters from the municipal level…and from the province…Therefore, multiplying the number of registered voters", and that only voter turnout and not the results for all positions will be affected.[6]

After starting 55 minutes late,[7] representative Didagen Dilangalen questioned the authenticity of the automated elections and opposed moves to open the ballot boxes containing machine-generated COCs. Enrile sought a compromise by proposing the creation of a technical working group that will hold a separate inquiry in the legitimacy of the automated election results. Dilangalen left the plenary after Zubiri made the motion to open the COCs from overseas absentee voting (OAV). After and six hours of joint session, canvassing for manually counted COCs were begun with OAVs from Laos being the first COC canvassed. Aquino and Roxas led after the first day that the COCs were canvassed. COCs from Guam, Brunei, Papua New Guinea and Thailand were the other COCs canvassed before Congress adjourned for the day.[15]

By the end of the week, the joint committee was avail to canvass 131 COCs, except for two: one COC from the Bahamas had irregularities and was deferred, while the COC from Iran was found to be empty.[16] As well, 26 countries and territories recorded zero votes for all positions namely: Guyana, Barbados, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Panama, Antigua and Barbuda, Cayman Islands, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Turks and Caicos Islands, Mozambique, Namibia, Swaziland, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Nepal, Dominican Republic, Madagascar, Malawi, Mauritius, Tanzania, and Iran (as stated before). This led to Senator Aquilino Pimentel, Jr. to question the COMELEC on the reason for the dismal result of overseas Filipinos failing to vote.[17]

May 31–June 4[edit]

The main crux of contention during the canvassing for the COCs transmitted electronically was the issue of null votes, i.e. overvotes, undervotes, abstentions, and votes were not tallied in CoCs because of incomplete transmission. The Aquino-Roxas Bantay Balota (ARBB, "Aquino-Roxas ballot watch") said that 3 million votes were considered null votes, and 10-15% of votes from Roxas' strongholds in Western Visayas and Central Visayas were wasted. In addition, according to them, if to 50-60% of the votes were for Roxas, he would've lost 250,000-300,000 votes. ARBB did not question null votes for the presidential election, where Aquino is leading. The commission, however, said that the nullified votes are the equivalent of "stray votes" before automation, and that rules on stray or null votes would apply even if votes were manually counted in an electoral protest, chairman Jose Melo said.[18]

Other frequent objections by lawyers representing the candidates were the lowering of thresholds of votes canvassed locally, which were then transmitted to the commission's servers, and mismatching figures in the electronic and manual COCs.

At the end of the week, only five COCs are left to be canvassed. COCs from Davao City, Bacolod, Mountain Province, Eastern Samar and Lanao del Sur, in which some municipalities held rescheduled elections on June 4. Session will resume on June 7.[19]

June 7–9[edit]

Aquino being proclaimed as the President-elect by Senate President Juan Ponce Enrile and House Speaker Prospero Nograles on June 9, 2010.

With only five COCs left on June 7 waiting to be canvassed, the Roxas camp was insisting on having a manual audit on all null votes. Congress, saying that it not within their rules to count the null votes, disallowed the motions and proceeded to canvass the four COCs in their possession – the COC from Lanao del Sur had not been delivered. This after 28 clustered precincts in the province failed to hold elections on June 3, the date of their rescheduled elections. As a result, with all but COC canvassed, Aquino and Binay had unassailable leads.[20]

On June 8, the Lanao del Sur COC was canvassed. In some precincts, Roxas had one or zero votes, and that there was 96% voter turnout in the province, revelations from Roxas' lawyer that representative Roilo Golez found to be "incredible . . . statistically improbable." The COC was still canvassed and Aquino and Binay will be proclaimed as president-elect and vice president-elect respectively, on June 9.[21]

On June 9, in a joint public session, Congress proclaimed Aquino as the president-elect, and Binay as the vice president-elect amidst a chorus of cheers from the gallery After the joint session was opened, Senate President pro tempore Jinggoy Estrada read his father's concession speech. The majority leaders of both Houses, Juan Miguel Zubiri and Arthur Defensor, Sr. both delivered their endorsement speeches supporting adopting the results of the canvass. Senate minority Aquilino Pimentel endorsed the resolution, and branded the acronym "PCOS" as "President Cory's Only Son", referring to Senator Aquino. The House deputy leaders Neptali Gonzales II and Roilo Golez also delivered speeches endorsing the resolution. Zuburi motioned that the resolution be passed, and was passed with no objection; Defensor also did the same for the House and was adopted without objections. The Senate President and House Speaker motioned to the majority leaders of both houses to accompany the president-elect and vice-president-elect to the session hall. With the resumption the session, Binay was first ushered on to the rostrum where Enrile and Nograles raised his hands; Aquino was then led to the rostrum where Nograles and Enrile, the man who had jailed his father Ninoy Aquino, raised his hand in victory.

The joint session for the canvassing and proclamation ended in a record time of eight days.[22] Aquino then held his first press conference as president-elect.

Presidential election[edit]

Based on the official canvass of the Congress of the Philippines[23]


e • d Summary of the May 10, 2010 Philippine presidential election results
Candidate Party Results
Votes %
Benigno Aquino III Liberal 15,208,678 42.08%
Joseph Estrada PMP 9,487,837 26.25%
Manny Villar Nacionalista 5,573,835 15.42%
Gilberto Teodoro Lakas-Kampi 4,095,839 11.33%
Eddie Villanueva Bangon Pilipinas 1,125,878 3.12%
Richard Gordon Bagumbayan-VNP 501,727 1.39%
Nicanor Perlas Independent 54,575 0.15%
Jamby Madrigal Independent 46,489 0.13%
John Carlos de los Reyes Ang Kapatiran 44,244 0.12%
Total valid votes 36,139,102 94.73%
Vetallano Acosta[p 1] KBL 181,985 0.48%
Total invalid votes 2,010,269 5.27%
Total turnout 38,149,371 74.34%
Registered voters 51,292,465 100.00%
  1. ^ Disqualified after the ballots were printed. All of his votes are considered spoiled
Province/City Aquino Estrada Villar Teodoro Villanueva Gordon Perlas Madrigal de los Reyes Acosta*
Abra 15,713 33,151 30,941 27,623 2,421 530 278 177 111 603
Agusan del Norte 118,547 42,338 30,992 64,041 12,278 1,773 392 286 258 2,245
Agusan del Sur 74,265 60,651 25,781 62,705 13,403 758 495 214 220 1,371
Aklan 105,451 46,174 40,673 31,402 6,201 2,241 380 267 267 1,242
Albay 340,571 65,626 76,839 47,177 9,760 4,123 731 1,301 888 4,351
Antique 93,400 40,496 52,820 16,871 6,048 1,382 574 348 360 1,371
Apayao 5,176 18,566 13,167 5,222 1,815 183 77 69 33 178
Aurora 23,060 35,956 11,690 6,251 5,089 644 78 76 70 389
Basilan 45,892 39,027 36,395 11,688 1,353 961 118 183 109 666
Bataan 130,322 105,072 77,066 23,255 12,271 6,256 385 453 292 919
Batanes 4,094 310 1,659 1,731 134 55 4 4 11 35
Batangas 629,977 187,900 92,835 84,241 35,029 10,653 740 1,140 1,062 3,580
Benguet
    •  Baguio
56,404
42,603
23,173
12,808
21,727
13,381
34,273
27,326
10,893
5,686
2,312
4,019
288
301
342
267
212
140
556
273
Biliran 21,270 10,700 25,281 11,866 2,315 357 142 101 131 600
Bohol 303,200 53,634 106,545 79,319 14,424 3,264 1,368 948 947 5,341
Bukidnon 157,417 200,449 95,039 29,304 13,662 1,870 1,259 563 1,107 7,958
Bulacan 521,549 344,413 95,129 74,168 67,184 28,348 1,260 1,542 1,169 3,012
Cagayan 127,198 143,911 99,962 54,659 12,502 2,650 698 615 466 2,439
Camarines Norte 94,705 63,048 21,705 12,554 6,173 1,691 239 333 235 1,232
Camarines Sur 315,681 122,885 148,509 69,722 13,958 4,779 811 1,222 825 4,113
Camiguin 9,749 3,334 2,185 28,784 447 75 72 23 18 194
Capiz 190,061 25,460 48,238 53,758 5,020 1,029 410 303 509 2,864
Catanduanes 35,434 70,591 8,580 4,959 2,921 759 233 125 153 539
Cavite 492,328 310,422 116,604 91,052 52,047 24,633 1,469 1,645 1,080 2,650
Cebu
    •  Cebu City
759,938
226,342
67,578
21,188
200,287
48,098
344,783
67,005
17,438
4,662
7,591
3,807
2,529
730
1,494
377
2,324
835
7,888
1,353
Compostela Valley 65,852 129,403 28,123 18,354 9,436 608 348 204 229 1,491
Cotabato 91,322 269,267 43,616 22,046 10,993 1,202 517 295 190 1,570
Davao del Norte 112,801 173,494 17,118 34,052 8,303 1,031 397 243 301 1,464
Davao del Sur
    •  Davao City
73,664
204,713
169,981
253,623
45,411
28,407
47,904
53,407
5,890
14,852
1,254
4,111
530
677
289
524
314
610
1,629
3,822
Davao Oriental 44,233 88,807 41,048 18,482 6,090 535 310 157 169 1,043
Dinagat Islands 9,249 3,191 7,024 22,550 1,201 222 79 50 46 282
Eastern Samar 76,028 59,261 35,620 13,696 7,134 1,315 483 368 307 1,208
Guimaras 21,004 4,581 21,065 24,256 1,349 290 112 83 61 233
Ifugao 28,435 16,024 14,024 6,353 9,828 611 122 171 118 381
Ilocos Norte 32,831 91,565 111,814 38,678 8,980 1,786 265 343 162 698
Ilocos Sur 56,917 39,655 147,664 56,105 9,533 2,176 309 481 230 708
Iloilo
    •  Iloilo City
374,038
96,043
45,836
16,652
268,567
41,248
54,100
27,464
13,876
4,245
3,461
1,882
2,989
419
964
191
912
224
4,410
539
Isabela 175,254 262,856 100,332 41,540 17,008 4,244 706 662 612 3,905
Kalinga 19,608 31,524 18,875 13,848 4,680 814 140 177 186 609
La Union 86,839 126,602 87,279 31,845 11,003 3,347 401 628 300 958
Laguna 442,620 354,363 87,869 70,957 46,334 23,823 1,313 1,561 1,139 2,680
Lanao del Norte 96,413 125,479 23,058 95,344 6,232 1,531 486 235 276 1,455
Lanao del Sur 136,625 16,808 89,088 30,315 2,982 3,313 319 448 213 1,146
Leyte 291,106 192,740 139,439 77,390 15,535 6,354 1,491 1,282 1,245 5,357
Maguindanao 163,377 52,020 125,400 47,082 4,686 1,832 297 444 183 1,441
Marinduque 45,839 35,967 8,430 5,642 2,601 837 177 113 142 596
Masbate 130,800 62,056 49,726 34,570 10,404 1,723 924 498 908 3,173
Metro Manila
    •  Caloocan
    •  Las Piñas
    •  Makati
    •  Malabon
    •  Mandaluyong
    •  Manila
    •  Marikina
    •  Muntinlupa
    •  Navotas
    •  Parañaque
    •  Pasay
    •  Pasig
    •  Quezon City
    •  San Juan
    •  TaguigPateros
    •  Valenzuela

195,571
67,404
125,333
57,510
61,239
298,217
75,905
89,125
24,413
99,988
78,445
128,189
364,048
22,225
104,373
90,203

131,936
26,655
70,065
48,301
36,964
214,517
33,953
48,446
49,374
45,230
58,187
63,674
206,435
21,341
61,735
53,959

30,989
83,620
22,957
9,392
9,304
52,560
9,170
20,480
4,779
16,762
14,457
22,737
42,475
2,511
20,688
18,241

36,853
18,677
40,313
11,772
17,702
72,521
15,842
17,664
5,204
25,133
18,381
25,011
87,292
7,289
18,187
18,300

17,174
6,354
8,774
4,642
3,996
20,022
6,283
6,617
3,113
5,723
5,772
8,766
24,728
1,736
7,971
7,561

12,087
6,632
10,073
4,366
4,869
22,403
15,579
5,055
1,839
7,259
4,569
8,746
31,556
2,249
4,430
6,358

591
283
494
209
237
1,090
249
194
92
302
253
351
1,545
106
252
232

697
232
382
268
147
1,029
250
274
125
232
226
355
1,048
84
318
298

465
260
415
171
165
812
224
237
80
290
182
319
1,170
85
216
194

1,061
327
607
302
323
1,599
393
510
153
556
465
609
1,746
103
717
464
Misamis Occidental 99,264 40,811 56,045 41,669 5,735 855 394 192 331 1,990
Misamis Oriental
    •  Cagayan de Oro
119,471
69,554
157,627
93,767
41,617
13,274
32,938
19,828
8,395
6,657
1,603
1,937
546
284
414
165
564
214
3,866
1,399
Mountain Province 20,415 15,117 13,258 11,570 7,705 798 166 215 105 312
Negros Occidental
    •  Bacolod
515,480
129,094
90,634
17,205
165,266
23,200
105,573
21,249
19,913
4,766
4,334
2,358
1,131
196
1,317
239
1,568
315
8,474
750
Negros Oriental 264,388 30,311 90,370 73,081 15,635 2,828 1,479 691 1,011 6,520
Northern Samar 103,015 65,141 28,782 32,263 6,556 832 531 257 376 2,523
Nueva Ecija 295,015 426,542 81,714 41,389 22,283 10,195 721 698 554 2,464
Nueva Vizcaya 49,964 52,005 46,494 10,944 8,442 1,288 189 179 167 586
Occidental Mindoro 50,468 83,222 13,700 10,791 4,483 998 197 148 175 696
Oriental Mindoro 148,884 95,866 28,998 15,109 16,563 1,893 324 254 276 1,448
Palawan 117,749 129,488 65,368 11,795 21,953 2,036 760 654 794 3,150
Pampanga 327,666 43,298 194,999 280,462 30,947 15,550 695 854 724 2,595
Pangasinan 537,533 223,441 318,533 105,157 42,095 13,995 1,020 2,222 1,278 5,477
Quezon 356,228 286,208 57,383 45,050 18,779 6,529 1,073 833 867 3,354
Quirino 19,341 27,162 17,028 5,281 4,915 630 121 92 63 282
Rizal 353,531 303,829 60,939 65,652 31,001 25,847 1,178 1,181 1,016 2,027
Romblon 44,369 27,256 36,571 6,537 6,820 587 169 116 130 411
Samar 122,195 85,985 71,015 16,768 9,005 1,058 642 453 408 2,137
Sarangani 25,882 91,327 26,588 22,161 5,106 405 322 155 100 728
Siquijor 21,521 4,390 3,899 17,618 839 213 110 45 67 243
Sorsogon 132,575 103,261 41,670 19,189 7,199 2,442 443 703 514 2,309
South Cotabato 126,682 284,494 24,432 18,713 11,360 1,937 586 304 279 1,728
Southern Leyte 80,373 13,862 27,486 60,456 5,038 1,006 316 234 232 892
Sultan Kudarat 62,760 146,042 18,424 5,058 3,984 439 264 139 149 661
Sulu 69,378 10,984 63,463 30,892 1,928 667 228 129 157 977
Surigao del Norte 74,813 31,509 62,579 33,259 10,736 842 364 319 273 1,268
Surigao del Sur 94,791 56,313 42,205 36,028 12,108 1,106 676 336 383 1,447
Tarlac 387,624 30,191 28,632 65,139 12,063 2,505 226 273 578 2,401
Tawi-Tawi 46,042 7,568 27,285 13,900 1,485 370 164 165 129 792
Zambales 127,722 84,451 26,545 14,381 9,137 49,462 228 385 623 934
Zamboanga del Norte 157,320 74,731 92,832 54,445 6,395 1,255 1,026 450 481 2,683
Zamboanga del Sur
    •  Zamboanga City
158,866
75,243
111,535
97,443
42,406
24,375
22,451
6,522
8,392
3,581
889
1,381
515
297
322
151
396
174
3,425
666
Zamboanga Sibugay 39,019 87,126 74,608 14,507 6,617 440 413 155 338 1,526
Absentee voters 86,297 16,307 18,357 20,154 19,721 7,102 229 256 241 149
Total 15,208,678 9,487,837 5,573,835 4,095,839 1,125,878 501,727 54,575 46,489 44,244 181,985
Province/City
Aquino Estrada Villar Teodoro Villanueva Gordon Perlas Madrigal de los Reyes Acosta*

*disqualified from running but is included in the ballot; all votes cast for him are spoiled.

Vice presidential election[edit]

e • d Summary of the May 10, 2010 Philippine vice presidential election results
Candidate Party Results
Votes %
Jejomar Binay PDP-Laban[v 1] 14,645,574 41.65%
Mar Roxas Liberal 13,918,490 39.58%
Loren Legarda NPC[v 2] 4,294,664 12.21%
Bayani Fernando Bagumbayan-VNP 1,017,631 2.89%
Edu Manzano Lakas-Kampi 807,728 2.30%
Perfecto Yasay Bangon Pilipinas 364,652 1.04%
Jay Sonza KBL 64,230 0.18%
Dominador Chipeco, Jr. Ang Kapatiran 52,562 0.15%
Total valid votes 35,165,555 92.18%
Total invalid votes 2,983,816 7.82%
Total turnout 38,149,371 74.38%
Registered voters 51,292,555 100.00%
  1. ^ Binay is Joseph Estrada's (PMP) guest candidate for vice president.
  2. ^ Legarda is Manny Villar's (Nacionalista) guest candidate for vice president.
Province/City Binay Roxas Legarda Fernando Manzano Yasay Sonza Chipeco
Abra 52,823 18,756 26,512 1,996 4,090 538 124 157
Agusan del Norte 84,539 122,638 24,294 4,414 21,204 4,381 409 508
Agusan del Sur 80,633 90,827 22,199 3,494 27,317 4,224 346 463
Aklan 52,466 133,545 22,061 13,103 1,780 2,149 347 285
Albay 222,543 244,286 41,062 12,697 8,510 3,384 982 1,176
Antique 46,213 87,893 57,893 4,241 3,600 2,165 418 469
Apayao 18,665 6,181 15,918 979 606 231 63 67
Aurora 35,247 20,924 20,917 2,338 761 1,128 109 85
Basilan 63,642 29,909 28,316 1,820 3,605 220 100 246
Bataan 170,477 109,705 51,044 9,582 3,576 3,844 642 296
Batanes 1,094 4,497 1,269 143 595 52 21 11
Batangas 558,748 383,170 56,780 14,481 9,033 8,367 1,003 772
Benguet
    •  Baguio
34,207
39,431
68,149
47,679
31,755
8,773
5,476
6,216
3,077
1,345
3,191
2,418
272
260
167
73
Biliran 33,907 18,174 8,864 1,028 3,570 804 136 118
Bohol 185,504 261,592 63,507 8,124 16,089 5,298 901 1,277
Bukidnon 170,290 198,318 84,462 8,479 9,968 5,203 1,528 1,237
Bulacan 559,241 408,011 81,939 44,471 8,258 16,544 2,082 789
Cagayan 222,701 115,931 76,514 8,277 5,221 2,016 535 679
Camarines Norte 86,670 77,273 25,182 4,498 2,516 2,223 229 302
Camarines Sur 232,976 271,672 109,373 13,677 20,492 5,028 1,083 1,327
Camiguin 5,147 9,674 2,150 222 25,993 204 22 41
Capiz 88,313 204,839 14,537 2,630 10,151 1,423 261 446
Catanduanes 65,176 32,318 13,725 3,400 1,456 1,044 297 207
Cavite 579,728 385,695 61,832 30,595 7,233 16,945 1,865 766
Cebu
    •  Cebu City
323,171
91,246
814,397
240,311
123,200
21,994
19,198
8,144
55,189
5,349
8,400
3,151
2,430
552
2,389
514
Compostela Valley 118,525 83,792 27,960 4,636 4,763 2,934 339 406
Cotabato 223,041 122,963 55,816 6,904 16,385 3,346 423 548
Davao del Norte 185,082 124,890 20,546 4,153 3,913 3,212 372 395
Davao del Sur
    •  Davao City
180,599
278,491
78,661
232,465
47,934
25,112
5,655
10,058
14,602
5,133
2,133
7,135
741
1,014
630
672
Davao Oriental 83,261 56,397 34,585 4,389 7,357 2,432 344 342
Dinagat Islands 5,982 10,320 5,507 1,746 17,515 399 54 59
Eastern Samar 73,711 60,029 35,593 5,061 4,592 2,282 421 428
Guimaras 8,274 48,300 7,735 716 3,130 552 82 93
Ifugao 20,843 29,312 16,807 1,920 1,262 2,693 117 137
Ilocos Norte 120,853 49,665 96,070 6,035 2,484 1,592 283 222
Ilocos Sur 95,318 96,750 94,141 6,834 4,313 1,892 435 226
Iloilo
    •  Iloilo City
111,219
38,128
503,959
123,108
99,416
11,354
9,008
5,717
11,888
5,098
5,075
2,286
2,378
226
1,219
114
Isabela 362,925 143,561 68,660 8,792 3,903 3,162 607 1,032
Kalinga 44,402 20,800 15,556 2,434 1,701 1,130 122 157
La Union 155,160 94,885 79,821 6,720 3,327 2,526 374 293
Laguna 560,978 328,130 73,694 31,184 7,051 14,749 1,752 3,775
Lanao del Norte 134,004 96,923 93,266 5,652 4,087 2,780 328 308
Lanao del Sur 144,203 29,074 82,512 2,785 3,990 740 316 287
Leyte 316,433 251,792 64,935 12,285 19,951 5,856 981 1,709
Maguindanao 181,286 45,463 137,752 3,447 11,081 1,274 373 424
Marinduque 37,133 39,141 14,121 3,771 1,717 831 155 116
Masbate 86,930 106,062 43,981 9,190 10,560 3,303 695 1,089
Metro Manila
    •  Caloocan
    •  Las Piñas
    •  Makati
    •  Malabon
    •  Mandaluyong
    •  Manila
    •  Marikina
    •  Muntinlupa
    •  Navotas
    •  Parañaque
    •  Pasay
    •  Pasig
    •  Quezon City
    •  San Juan
    •  TaguigPateros
    •  Valenzuela

226,580
93,958
179,375
72,592
69,924
375,813
45,696
95,085
56,144
93,564
112,696
123,935
363,841
29,311
120,046
92,246

151,750
73,243
74,897
43,827
48,339
226,804
58,019
70,626
21,907
80,789
51,576
100,239
302,618
20,649
75,200
75,709

19,182
23,717
7,504
9,523
4,912
30,428
4,653
8,540
5,026
8,451
5,842
10,271
25,275
1,570
10,065
13,020

18,203
12,849
11,137
6,736
7,955
32,736
46,182
8,986
3,051
12,243
6,022
17,101
49,130
4,380
7,910
9,398

3,260
1,905
2,566
1,059
1,251
6,580
827
1,332
560
2,152
1,309
2,034
6,717
646
1,316
1,725

5,469
2,953
2,638
1,614
1,613
7,594
1,633
2,266
1,275
2,387
2,115
3,278
9,300
767
2,843
2,439

779
572
703
308
330
1,684
305
346
157
421
363
621
1,694
166
392
369

214
144
154
86
101
490
73
116
54
163
115
177
700
72
94
107
Misamis Occidental 53,496 97,944 45,857 3,018 23,831 1,942 324 411
Misamis Oriental
    •  Cagayan de Oro
164,548
115,938
120,442
70,116
39,325
9,601
6,460
4,551
9,949
1,918
3,530
2,962
483
343
757
156
Mountain Province 19,788 21,053 18,398 2,073 1,672 2,069 123 94
Negros Occidental
    •  Bacolod
177,063
44,505
571,155
135,742
85,038
7,461
12,066
4,876
16,578
2,250
7,121
1,798
1,535
217
2,345
203
Negros Oriental 96,759 257,234 54,787 9,152 20,994 6,085 1,361 1,708
Northern Samar 67,750 88,980 38,340 3,999 15,642 2,296 354 659
Nueva Ecija 471,431 265,321 95,241 17,243 5,917 6,006 996 618
Nueva Vizcaya 63,653 53,821 41,571 3,779 1,620 2,630 226 195
Occidental Mindoro 81,059 48,107 20,681 3,279 5,655 994 172 141
Oriental Mindoro 116,401 138,464 32,645 4,893 3,456 4,946 418 336
Palawan 107,677 99,882 107,389 12,023 6,946 4,121 683 775
Pampanga 220,357 413,016 129,569 66,040 29,951 11,105 4,291 688
Pangasinan 441,055 517,563 215,789 30,333 13,226 10,434 1,506 1,342
Quezon 334,582 300,293 86,236 15,452 9,831 5,950 2,079 621
Quirino 32,986 19,208 17,319 1,866 797 849 82 125
Rizal 421,915 289,043 50,441 60,063 6,162 9,342 1,718 614
Romblon 33,068 43,756 30,297 4,215 1,363 1,822 136 113
Samar 115,887 96,212 54,408 5,094 5,755 2,988 747 524
Sarangani 66,789 39,184 34,384 3,617 13,561 1,507 297 330
Siquijor 7,843 21,631 3,362 599 11,541 322 39 78
Sorsogon 174,865 80,388 29,418 7,615 4,151 1,869 501 701
South Cotabato 210,132 194,508 40,288 9,633 5,272 3,559 529 453
Southern Leyte 47,672 76,056 15,983 2,561 31,230 2,111 284 441
Sultan Kudarat 111,762 52,001 60,164 3,211 2,481 1,328 284 222
Sulu 59,559 35,101 50,905 3,101 10,188 400 286 329
Surigao del Norte 60,251 73,883 44,474 4,719 12,214 3,805 351 387
Surigao del Sur 75,373 92,096 39,209 5,150 15,479 3,683 555 532
Tarlac 129,523 317,843 51,119 9,282 8,138 4,211 912 534
Tawi-Tawi 25,619 30,725 29,328 2,790 2,181 232 175 202
Zambales 116,197 131,859 34,180 20,089 3,065 2,745 553 369
Zamboanga del Norte 144,808 158,568 33,412 5,945 13,746 2,080 761 880
Zamboanga del Sur
    •  Zamboanga City
171,806
95,344
92,107
85,715
35,611
20,932
4,432
2,953
6,771
1,917
2,334
1,181
374
233
1,217
259
Zamboanga Sibugay 114,204 42,039 35,090 3,981 13,352 1,765 358 549
Absentee voters 31,524 88,436 19,487 10,644 3,302 13,457 785 246
Totals 14,645,574 13,918,490 4,294,664 1,017,631 807,728 364,652 64,230 52,562
Province/City
Binay Roxas Legarda Fernando Manzano Yasay Sonza Chipeco

References[edit]

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  23. ^ [1] National Canvassing System - Philippine House of Representatives