List of Congressional opponents of the Vietnam War

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This is a list of U.S. Senators and Representatives who opposed the Vietnam War. This includes those who initially supported the war, but later changed their stance to a strong opposition to it.

Name Political Party Affiliation at time of Opposition Dates in U.S. Congressional Office
Bella Abzug[1] Democratic January 3, 1971 - January 3, 1977
Les Aspin[2] Democratic January 3, 1971 - January 20, 1993
George Brown, Jr.[3] Democratic January 3, 1963 - January 3, 1971;
January 3, 1973 - July 15, 1999
Philip Burton[4] Democratic February 18, 1964 - April 10, 1983
Frank Church[5] Democratic January 3, 1957 – January 5, 1981
John Sherman Cooper[6] Republican November 6, 1946 – January 3, 1949;
November 5, 1952 – January 3, 1955;
November 7, 1956 – January 3, 1973
Ron Dellums[7] Democratic January 3, 1971 – February 6, 1998
Robert Drinan[8] Democratic January 3, 1971 – January 3, 1973;

January 3, 1973 – January 3, 1981

J. William Fulbright[9] Democratic January 3, 1945 – December 31, 1974
Albert Gore, Sr.[10] Democratic January 3, 1953 – January 3, 1971
Mike Gravel[11] Democratic January 3, 1969 – January 3, 1981
Vance Hartke[12] Democratic January 3, 1959 – January 3, 1977
Mark Hatfield[13] Republican January 3, 1967 – January 3, 1997
Jacob K. Javits[14] Republican January 3, 1947 – December 31, 1954;

January 9, 1957 – January 3, 1981

Robert F. Kennedy[15] Democratic January 3, 1965 – June 6, 1968
Ed Koch[16] Democratic January 3, 1969 – January 3, 1973;
January 3, 1973 – December 31, 1977
Allard K. Lowenstein[17] Democratic 1969–1971
Eugene McCarthy[18] Democratic-Farmer-Labor January 3, 1949 – January 3, 1959;
January 3, 1959 – January 3, 1971
Pete McCloskey[19] Republican December 12, 1967 – January 3, 1983
George McGovern[20] Democratic January 3, 1957 – January 3, 1961;
January 3, 1963 – January 3, 1981
Mike Mansfield[21] Democratic January 3, 1943 – January 3, 1953;
January 3, 1953 – January 3, 1977
Charles Mathias[22] Republican January 3, 1961 – January 3, 1969;
January 3, 1969 – January 6, 1987
Patsy Mink[23] Democratic 1965–1977;
1991–2002
Wayne Morse[24] Democratic January 3, 1945 – January 3, 1969
Tip O'Neill[25] Democratic January 3, 1953 – January 3, 1963;
January 3, 1963 – January 3, 1987
William Proxmire[26] Democratic August 28, 1957 – January 3, 1989
Henry S. Reuss[27] Democratic January 3, 1955 – January 3, 1983
Donald W. Riegle, Jr.[28] Republican March 3, 1966 – December 30, 1976;
December 30, 1976 – January 3, 1995
James H. Scheuer[29] Democratic January 3, 1965 – January 3, 1973;
January 3, 1975 – January 3, 1993
Eugene Siler[30] Republican 1955 – 1963;
1963 - 1965
Pete Stark[31] Democratic 1973 – present
Andrew Young[32] Democratic January 3, 1973 – January 29, 1977

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Laura Mansnerus (1 April 1998). "Bella Abzug, 77, Congresswoman And a Founding Feminist, Is Dead". The New York Times. 
  2. ^ "Les Aspin January 21, 1993 - February 3, 1994 18th Secretary of Defense Clinton Administration". U.S. Department of Defense. 
  3. ^ Stephen Green (17 July 1999). "Liberal Representative George Brown Jr. Dies". Daily News. 
  4. ^ "13 Demos Press to End War". The Deseret News. 25 May 1971. 
  5. ^ Schmitz, David F. (2003). "Congress Must Draw the Line: Senator Frank Church and Opposition to the Vietnam War and the Imperial Presidency". In Woods, Randall Bennett. Vietnam and the American political tradition. Cambridge University Press. pp. 121–148. ISBN 0-521-01000-4. 
  6. ^ Albin Krebs (23 February 1991). "John Sherman Cooper Dies at 89; Long-time Senator From Kentucky". The New York Times. 
  7. ^ "Ronald V. Dellums; Representative, 1971–1998, Democrat from California". Black Americans in Congress, 1870–2007. Office of History and Preservation, Office of the Clerk, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 2008. Retrieved 17 April 2009. 
  8. ^ "Friends and Students Remember Jesuit Pioneer". Georgetown University. 5 February 2007. 
  9. ^ "J. William Fulbright". Encyclopædia Britannica. 2009. Retrieved 17 April 2009. 
  10. ^ Melinda Henneberger (22 May 2000). "A Political Father Who Chose the High Road and Unpopular Stands". The New York Times. 
  11. ^ David E. Rosenbaum (5 June 1971). "Senators Reject Limits on Draft; 2-Year Plan Gains" (fee required). The New York Times. Retrieved 2007-12-29. 
  12. ^ Myrna Oliver (29 July 2003). "Vance Hartke, 84; Indiana Senator Opposed Johnson on Vietnam". Los Angeles Times. 
  13. ^ "The Viet Nam Race". Time Magazine. 14 October 1966. 
  14. ^ Mann, Robert (2002). A Grand Delusion: America's Descent into Vietnam. Basic Books. p. 554. ISBN 0-465-04370-4. Retrieved April 19, 2009. 
  15. ^ Thurston Clarke (June 2008). "The Last Good Campaign". Vanity Fair. 
  16. ^ "Ed Koch's Legacy". Gotham Gazette. 14 November 2005. Retrieved 19 April 2009. 
  17. ^ Olson, James Stuart (1999). Historical dictionary of the 1960s. Greenwood Publishing Group. pp. 281–282. ISBN 0-313-29271-X. Retrieved April 19, 2009. 
  18. ^ Francis X. Clines (11 December 2005). "Eugene J. McCarthy, Senate Dove Who Jolted '68 Race, Dies at 89". The New York Times. 
  19. ^ "White knight in a battle-bus". The Economist. 1 June 2006. 
  20. ^ "The Plight of The Doves". Time Magazine. 14 September 1970. 
  21. ^ Matusow, Allen (1984). "The Vietnam War, the Liberals, and the Overthrow of LBJ". 
  22. ^ "Back in Time: At War with War". CNN. 
  23. ^ "Patsy T. Mink". Women in Congress. Office of the Clerk, U.S. Capitol, Room H154 - Washington, DC. 
  24. ^ "FBI Investigated Wayne Morse Over Vietnam War Opposition; Johnson Allegedly Ordered Probe of Senator". The Washington Post. 17 July 1988. (subscription required (help)). 
  25. ^ Martin Tolchin (7 January 1994). "Thomas P. O'Neill Jr., a Democratic Power in the House for Decades, Dies at 81". The New York Times. 
  26. ^ Richard Severo (16 December 2005). "William Proxmire, Maverick Democratic Senator From Wisconsin, Is Dead at 90". The New York Times. 
  27. ^ Graeme Zielinski (15 January 2002). "Longtime Rep. Henry Reuss Dies; Wis. Democrat a Banking Expert" (fee required). The Washington Post. He also was a foe of the Communist-baiting Sen. Joseph R. McCarthy (R-Wis.); an early supporter of civil rights, conservation and congressional reform legislation; and a vocal opponent of the Vietnam War. 
  28. ^ "Strong Criticism Comes in Reaction to Bombing". The Virgin Islands Daily News. 22 December 1972. 
  29. ^ Morgan, Joseph G. (1997). The Vietnam Lobby. UNC Press. p. 110. ISBN 0-8078-2322-8. Retrieved April 19, 2009. 
  30. ^ Beito, David T; Beito, Linda Royster (21 August 2006). "The Christian Conservative Who Opposed the Vietnam War". History News Network. 
  31. ^ Carl Hulse (9 February 2003). "Threats and Responses: The Draft; A New Tactic Against War: Renew Talk About Draft". The New York Times. 
  32. ^ "Andrew Young". Encyclopædia Britannica.