Connecticut Brakettes

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Stratford Brakettes
ConnBrakettes.PNG
League Amateur Softball Association
Location Stratford, Connecticut
Ballpark Frank DeLuca Hall of Fame Field
Year founded 1947[1]
Colors red, white, blue[1]
              
Management Bob Baird[2]
Coach John Stratton

The Connecticut Brakettes is a women's fastpitch softball team based in Stratford, Connecticut. The team has won many state, regional, national, and international tournaments (28 as of 2009).[1][3][4]

History[edit]

The team was founded in 1947 by William S. Simpson as the Raybestos Girl All-Stars.[5] Over the years the team name has changed to Raybestos Brakettes (1948), Hi-Ho Brakettes, Stratford Brakettes, or Connecticut Brakettes (2006).[1] The Brakette name is derived from the main product of the Raybestos plant in Stratford which produced brake linings for automobiles and trucks.[1]

In 2006 the Brakettes fielded two teams. The Connecticut Brakettes were members of National Pro Fastpitch (NPF), finishing second in the regular season with a record of 27-15. In the NPF championship game, the Connecticut Brakettes lost to the fourth place New England Riptide 2-0. In 2006 they also fielded the Stratford Brakettes in the Amateur Softball Association (ASA). They won the 2006 women's major fastpitch tournament held in Amherst, New York.[6]

The Brakettes dropped out of the NPF league in 2007 but still competes as an amateur team in the women's major division of the Amateur Softball Association (ASA).

Highlights of the Brakettes' seasons include:[1][7][8]

year wins losses post season comments
1947 16 4 Lost in the state tournament quarter-finals in a 22-21 game Team founded as Raybestos Girl All-Stars
1948 18 2 Eastern Coast Women's Softball championship winners Team name changed to Raybestos Brakettes
1950 Appeared at ASA national tournament A national tournament game against host San Antonio, Texas Thompson team is won 2-1
1956 4th place finish in national tournament held in Clearwater, Florida
1958 52 5 Beat the Hacienda Rockets for first ASA Women's Major Fastpitch championship National tournament held at Raybestos Memorial Field in Stratford
1959–1960 Second and third consecutive national championship winners
1961 3rd place finish in 2-1 loss to eventual championship winners the Whittier, California Gold Sox Championship held in Portland, Oregon
1965 At the first ISF Women's World Championship in Melbourne, Australia, Brakettes finish 2nd place in a loss to the host team
1966 74 4
1967 Winner of their 6th ASA national championship, the National All-Star Series, and the Pan American Games
1968 Tie with Orange, California Lionettes for ASA National title (7th for the Brakettes)
1970 2nd place finish at ISF Women's World Championship in Osaka
1971 57 0 ASA fastpitch national championship
1974 1st place finish at ISF Women's World Championship, ASA Women's Major Fastpitch champions (4th consecutive year)[1] ISF championship is held at Raybestos Memorial Field in Stratford[1]
1976 44 11 ASA fastpitch national championship John Stratton is temporary coach for disabled Ralph Raymond
1978 78 8 ASA national champions (1978 is the 8th consecutive and 15th overall championship for the Brakettes)
1980 ASA national champions Championship held in East Lansing, Michigan
1985 Team name is changed to Hi-Ho Brakettes
1986 Winners of the ISF championship in Auckland, New Zealand; gold medal in U.S. Olympic Sports Festival, First place at Canada Cup in Vancouver; 2nd place ASA championship
1990 D'Addario drops sponsorship, resumed by Raymark-Raybestos (no longer in Stratford) through 1995
1993 2nd place finish in ASA championship against the Redding Rebels The championship is held in Stratford at DeLuca field.[9]
1995 57 3
1996 4 way tie for 9th place finish in ASA fastpitch national championship[10] Championship held in Stratford at DeLuca Field.[9] Team is sponsored by David Olin Carpenter.
1997 4 way tie for 9th place finish in ASA fastpitch national championship[11]
1998 4 way tie for 9th place finish in ASA fastpitch national championship[12]
1999 3rd place finish in ASA fastpitch national championship[13] Championship held in Stratford
2000 3rd place finish in ASA fastpitch national championship[14]
2001 3rd place finish in ASA fastpitch national championship[15]
2002 78 1 ASA Women's Major Fastpitch champions (24th)[16] Championship held in Stratford at DeLuca Field.[9]
2003 65 5 ASA Women's Major Fastpitch champions (25th)[17] 4th place finish at Canada Cup
2004 50 4 ASA Women's Major Fastpitch champions (26th)[18]
2005 51 17 2nd place finish in ASA fastpitch national championship[19] Championship held in Stratford at DeLuca Field.[9]
2006 27 15 2nd place finish in NPF Team called Connecticut Brakettes in the NPF league
46 4 1st place finish in ASA Major fastpitch tournament (27th) in Amherst, New York against the Southern California Sliders[6] Team called Stratford Brakettes in the ASA league
2007 ASA Women's Major Fastpitch champions (28th)[20] Only an ASA team is fielded this season
2008 3rd place finish in ASA fastpitch national championship[21]
2009 49 7 4th place after 1-0 loss to Stratford Breakers Regional ASA championship held in Stratford at DeLuca Field[22][23]
Total > 3,242 3 ISF Women's World Championship, 28 ASA National Championships, 19 National Hall of Fame members, and 11 Olympians

Players[edit]

Notable Brakette players have included:

  • Shirley Topley (b April 14, 1934) played 1963-1964 with the Brakettes, coached the Orange, California Lionettes, was inducted into the national hall of fame in 1981.[24]
  • E. Louise "Lou" Albrecht (b November 19, 1934) played 1969 with the Brakettes, was inducted to the national hall of fame in 1985.[25]
  • Rosemary "Micki" Macchietto Stratton (b July 12, 1938) played 1956-1965 and was elected to the national hall of fame in 1969.[26]
  • Joan Joyce (b 1940) played 1954-1963 and 1967-1975 (19 seasons) for the Brakettes, was inducted into the National Softball Hall of Fame and Museum in 1983,[27][28] the International Softball Federation Hall of Fame in 1999,[29] and has been coach of the Florida Atlantic University softball team since its founding.[27]
  • Billie Moore (b May 5, 1943) played 1969-1972 with the Brakettes, went on to become an accomplished Olympic and college basketball coach.[30]
  • Donna Lopiano (b 1946) played 1965-1972 with the Brakettes, also played at the first ISF Women's World Championship in Melbourne, Australia in 1965. Inducted to the Hall of Fame in 1983.[31]
  • Sharron Backus (b February 12, 1946) played 1969-1975 with the Brakettes, was inducted to the national hall of fame in 1985, and was head coach of softball at UCLA from 1975 to 1997 which included 9 wins of the Women's College World Series.[32]
  • Bertha Ragan Tickey played 1956-1968 with the Brakettes, was inducted into the national hall of fame in 1972.[33]
  • Peggy Kellers (b March 19, 1948) played 1964-1974 for the Brakettes, was softball coach at the University of Virginia 1993-1997, and was inducted to the National Hall of Fame in 1986.[34]
  • Patty Harrison played 1964-1972 with the Brakettes, was inducted into the national hall of fame in 1976.[35]
  • Kathryn "Sis" King played 1965-1967 with the Brakettes, was inducted into the national hall of fame in 1975.[36]
  • Wiltraud "Willie" Roze (b November 8, 1948) played 1965-1975 and was elected to the national hall of fame in 1985.[37]
  • Rose Marie "Rosie" Adams (b August 22, 1951) played 1971-1974 and was elected to the national hall of fame in 1987.[38]
  • Barabara Reinalda (b February 13, 1957) played 1976-1994 with the Brakettes, was inducted into the national hall of fame in 1999.[39]
  • Dot Richardson (b 1961) played 1984-1994 for the Brakettes then went on to win a gold medal in the 1996 Olympic games, and was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2006.[40]
  • Sheila Cornell-Douty (b 1962) played 1988-1994 for the Brakettes then went on to win gold medals in the 1996 and 2000 Olympic games, and was inducted into the National Hall of Fame in 2006,[41] and the ISF Hall of Fame in 2007.[29]
  • Diane "Schuie" Schumacher played 1976-1986 with the Brakettes, was the head coach of the Netherlands women's national softball team in 1987, was inducted into the national hall of fame in 1992 and the ISF hall of fame in 1993.[42]
  • Gina Vecchione (b 1965) played 1978-1989, has coached at UCLA, UC Berkeley, and Oregon State University; was inducted into the national hall of fame in 1997.[43]
  • Kathy Arendsen played 1978-1992 was elected to the national hall of fame in 1996[44] and the ISF hall of fame and the Michigan Sports Hall of Fame both in 2003.[29][45]
  • Pat Dufficy played 1977-1983, 1985–1995, 1997 (19 seasons) with the Brakettes, was inducted into the national hall of fame in 2005.[46]
  • Lisa Fernandez (b 1971) played in the 1990 through 1994 seasons with the Brakettes, three time Olympic gold medalist.[30][47]
  • Courtney Blades (b 1978) pitched one 5 game tournament in 2000, including a perfect game.
  • Kelly Kretschman (b 1979) played in the 2003 and 2006 seasons.[30][47]
  • Cat Osterman (b 1983) played in the 2001, 2002, and 2005 seasons.[30][47]
  • Andrea Duran (b 1984) played in the 2006 season and went on to win a gold medal in the 2006 ISF World Championship and a silver medal in the 2008 Olympics.[47]
  • Katie Burkhart (b 1986) played in the 2007 season.

Coaches[edit]

Brakette coaches have included:[1]

  • Bernie Kaplan 1947-1956 seasons
  • Vin Cullen 1957-1961
  • Vincent "Wee" Devitt (April 10, 1912-March 17, 1988) Brakette manager 1962-1967, also Raybestos Cardinal manager and National Softball Hall of Fame and Museum member.[48]
  • Ralph Raymond 1968-1994 – two-time Olympic team coach (1996, 2000) and Hall of Fame manager[49][50]
  • John Stratton 1995–present

Stadia[edit]

The Brakettes played from 1947 through 1987 at Raybestos Memorial Field near the center of the town of Stratford.[51] In 1974 Raybestos Memorial hosted the ISF Women's World Championship in which the United States beat Japan for the gold medal. Starting in the 1988 season they played at a field that was originally built in 1966 and has been known as Avco Lycoming Field, Textron Lycoming Field, AlliedSignal Field, and was renamed Frank DeLuca Hall of Fame Field in 1997.[9][52] Frank "Hooks" DeLuca was a pitcher for the men's slowpitch team sponsored by Avco Lycoming in Stratford who was inducted into the National Softball Hall of Fame in 1974.[53] In addition to the Brakettes, DeLuca Field is home to the Stratford Breakers and Stratford Seahawks softball teams, the Stratford High School girl’s softball team, the Stratford Police Athletic League girl’s softball teams, the Men’s Industrial Slow Pitch League, and the Stratford Recreation Department Slow Pitch League games.[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Brakettes: History". Retrieved 2009-08-07. 
  2. ^ "Brakettes Softball;185 Lordship Road;Stratford, CT 06615". Retrieved 2009-08-07. 
  3. ^ "Brakettes Archives". Retrieved 2009-08-07. 
  4. ^ Hays, Graham (July 21, 2008). "The saga of the Stratford Brakettes". ESPN. Retrieved 2009-10-20. 
  5. ^ "National Softball Hall of Fame Member: William S. Simpson". Retrieved 2009-08-30. 
  6. ^ a b "ASA National Championship Results: 2006 ASA Women's Major Fast Pitch". Amherst, New York. August 10, 2006 through August 13, 2006. Retrieved 2009-10-24. 
  7. ^ "Brakettes- National Tournaments". Retrieved 2009-08-08. 
  8. ^ "ASA Prior Championships: Women's Fast Pitch". Retrieved 2009-10-22. 
  9. ^ a b c d e f "Stratford, Connecticut - DeLuca Field". Town of Stratford. Retrieved 2009-10-22. 
  10. ^ "ASA National Championship Results: 1996 ASA Women's Major Fast Pitch". Stratford, CT. August 16, 1996 through August 21, 1996. Retrieved 2009-10-22. 
  11. ^ "ASA National Championship Results: 1997 ASA Women's Major Fast Pitch". Phoenix, AZ. August 13, 1997 through August 17, 1997. Retrieved 2009-10-22. 
  12. ^ "ASA National Championship Results: 1998 ASA Women's Major Fast Pitch". Decatur, IL. August 10, 1998 through August 15, 1998. Retrieved 2009-10-22. 
  13. ^ "ASA National Championship Results: 1999 ASA Women's Major Fast Pitch". Stratford, CT. August 13, 1999 through August 18, 1999. 
  14. ^ "ASA National Championship Results: 2000 ASA Women's Major Fast Pitch". Clearwater, FL. August 9,c2000 through August 13, 2000. Retrieved 2009-10-22. 
  15. ^ "ASA National Championship Results: 2001 ASA Women's Major Fast Pitch". Phoenix, AZ. August 14, 2001 through August 19, 2001. Retrieved 2009-10-22. 
  16. ^ "ASA National Championship Results: 2002 ASA Women's Major Fast Pitch". Stratford, CT. August 16, 2002 through August 21, 2002. Retrieved 2009-10-22. 
  17. ^ "ASA National Championship Results: 2003 ASA Women's Major Fast Pitch". Pekin, IL. August 12, 2003 through August 17, 2003. Retrieved 2009-10-22. 
  18. ^ "ASA National Championship Results: 2004 ASA Women's Major Fast Pitch". Auburn, AL. August 10, 2004 through August 15, 2004. Retrieved 2009-10-22. 
  19. ^ "ASA National Championship Results: 2005 ASA Women's Major Fast Pitch". Stratford, CT. August 12, 2005 through August 17, 2005. Retrieved 2009-10-22. 
  20. ^ "ASA National Championship Results: 2007 ASA Women's Major Fast Pitch". South Bend, IN. August 4, 2007 through August 7, 2007. Retrieved 2009-10-22. 
  21. ^ "ASA National Championship Results: 2008 ASA Women's Major Fast Pitch". Amherst, NY. August 7, 2008 through August 10, 2008. Retrieved 2009-10-22. 
  22. ^ "Brakettes Eliminated by Breakers as Plourde Shines". August 10, 2009. Retrieved 2009-08-10. 
  23. ^ "ASA National Championship Results: 2009 ASA Women's Major Fast Pitch (cancelled)". Alabama. July 30, 2008 through August 2, 2008. Retrieved 2009-10-29. 
  24. ^ "National Softball Hall of Fame Member: Shirley Topley". Retrieved 2009-10-24. 
  25. ^ "National Softball Hall of Fame Member: E. Louise Albrecht". Retrieved 2009-10-24. 
  26. ^ "National Softball Hall of Fame Member: Rosemary (Micki) Stratton". Retrieved 2009-10-23. 
  27. ^ a b "Player Bio: Joan Joyce :: Softball". Florida Atlantic University. Retrieved 2009-08-07. 
  28. ^ "National Softball Hall of Fame Member: Joan Joyce". Retrieved 2009-08-09. 
  29. ^ a b c "International Softball Federation - The ISF: Inductess/Bios". Retrieved 2009-08-09. 
  30. ^ a b c d "Brakettes All-Time Roster". Retrieved 2009-10-20. 
  31. ^ "National Softball Hall of Fame Member: Donna Lopiano". Retrieved 2009-08-08. 
  32. ^ "National Softball Hall of Fame Member: Sharron Backus". Retrieved 2009-10-24. 
  33. ^ "National Softball Hall of Fame Member: Bertha Ragan Tickey". Retrieved 2009-10-24. 
  34. ^ "National Softball Hall of Fame Member: Peggy Kellers". Retrieved 2009-10-23. 
  35. ^ "National Softball Hall of Fame Member: Pat Harrison". Retrieved 2009-10-24. 
  36. ^ "National Softball Hall of Fame Member: Kathryn (Sis) King". Retrieved 2009-10-24. 
  37. ^ "National Softball Hall of Fame Member: Willie Roze". Retrieved 2009-10-23. 
  38. ^ "National Softball Hall of Fame Member: Rose Marie (Rosie) Adams". Retrieved 2009-10-24. 
  39. ^ "National Softball Hall of Fame Member: Barbara Reinalda". Retrieved 2009-10-24. 
  40. ^ "National Softball Hall of Fame Member: Dot Richardson". Retrieved 2009-08-08. 
  41. ^ "National Softball Hall of Fame Member: Sheila Cornell Douty". Retrieved 2009-08-08. 
  42. ^ "National Softball Hall of Fame Member: Diane Schumacher". Retrieved 2009-10-24. 
  43. ^ "National Softball Hall of Fame Member: Gina Vecchione". Retrieved 2009-10-23. 
  44. ^ "National Softball Hall of Fame Member: Kathy Arendsen". Retrieved 2009-10-24. 
  45. ^ "Michigan Sports Hall of Fame". Retrieved 2009-10-24. 
  46. ^ "National Softball Hall of Fame Member: Pat Dufficy". Retrieved 2009-19-24. 
  47. ^ a b c d Fornabaio, Michael (August 3, 2008). "Connecticut Olympians aim for gold". Connecticut Post. Retrieved 2009-10-20. [dead link]
  48. ^ "National Softball Hall of Fame Member: Vincent (Wee) Devitt". Retrieved 2009-08-07. 
  49. ^ "USA Softball: All-time Olympic Games Rosters". Retrieved 2009-08-07. 
  50. ^ "National Softball Hall of Fame Member: Ralph Raymond". Retrieved 2009-08-07. 
  51. ^ The remains of Raybestos Memorial Field are along Frog Pond Lane at 41°12′13″N 73°07′16″W / 41.2037°N 73.1212°W / 41.2037; -73.1212 (Raybestos Memorial Field)
  52. ^ "Frank DeLuca Hall of Fame Field". Retrieved 2009-08-07. 
  53. ^ "National Softball Hall of Fame Member: Frank DeLuca". Retrieved 2009-10-22. 

External links[edit]