Connecticut Department of Children and Families

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Connecticut Department of Children and Families
Agency overview
Jurisdiction Government of Connecticut
Headquarters 505 Hudson Street Hartford, CT 06106
Minister responsible Joette Katz[1]
Website http://www.ct.gov/dcf/site/default.asp

The Connecticut Department of Children and Families (DCF) is a state agency of Connecticut providing family services. Its headquarters are in Hartford.[2]

Bureau of Juvenile Services[edit]

The Bureau of Juvenile Services operates the state's correctional facilities for children; it received its current name in 2003. The Connecticut Juvenile Training School (CJTS) is the state's secure facility for delinquent boys.[3] The CJTS is located in Middletown. The $57 million juvenile correctional center opened in August 2001.[4]

The state of Connecticut previously operated the Long Lane School in Middletown, a juvenile correctional facility for boys and girls of the ages 11–16.[5] In 2002 the Government of Connecticut announced that the Long Lane School, then the state's juvenile center for girls, was closing. Girls were moved to the Connecticut Children's Place in East Windsor. The closure occurred after the Attorney General of Connecticut, Richard Blumenthal, and a state child advocate, Jeanne Milstein, investigated a suicide attempt at Long Lane and then asked DCF to review its practices regarding the safety of delinquent girls.[4]

In 1989, a group of plaintiffs instituted an action against the Connecticut DCF [6] which resulted in a requirement for federal court supervision of DCF, which has continued for more than 20 years to date. The Connecticut DCF, as recently as 2012, is still under this supervision due to its inability to correct the problems identified.[citation needed]

Connecticut Children's Place[edit]

The Connecticut Children's Place (CCP), located in East Windsor, is a state residential and educational center for abused and neglected children of the ages 10–18.[7] After the closure of the Long Lane School, CCP became the housing point of delinquent girls adjudicated by the state.[4]

Commissioners[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.wianews.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=389:a-talk-with-dcf-commissioner&catid=46:features
  2. ^ "Send Us Your Comments and Questions." Connecticut Department of Children and Families. Retrieved on August 23, 2010.
  3. ^ "Welcome to the Bureau of Juvenile Services." Connecticut Department of Children and Families. Retrieved on August 23, 2010.
  4. ^ a b c Seay, Gregory. "LONG LANE TO CLOSE SOON ; GIRLS FROM SCHOOL TO BE DISPERSED." Hartford Courant. November 26, 2002. B1. Retrieved on August 23, 2010.
  5. ^ "DCF Offices and Facilities." Connecticut Department of Children and Families. February 13, 1998. Retrieved on December 2, 2010.
  6. ^ "Welcome to Connecticut Children's Place." Connecticut Department of Children and Families. Retrieved on December 2, 2010.

External links[edit]