Connecticut gubernatorial election, 2010

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Connecticut gubernatorial election, 2010
Connecticut
2006 ←
November 2, 2010 → 2014

  DannelMalloy.jpg Thomas C Foley.jpg
Nominee Dannel Malloy Thomas C. Foley
Party Democratic Republican
Running mate Nancy Wyman Mark Boughton
Popular vote 567,278 560,874
Percentage 49.51% 48.95%

Connecticut Gubernatorial Election Results by municipality, 2010.png

Municipal results

Governor before election

M. Jodi Rell
Republican

Elected Governor

Dannel Malloy
Democratic

The 2010 Connecticut gubernatorial election took place on November 2, 2010 to elect the 88th Governor of Connecticut. Incumbent Governor M. Jodi Rell had announced in a press conference in Hartford on November 9, 2009, that she would not seek re-election in 2010.[1] The non-partisan Cook Political Report and CQ Politics both rated the election as a toss up.[2][3]

Gubernatorial primaries for the Republican and Democratic parties took place on August 10, 2010.

Thomas C. Foley conceded the race on November 8, 2010.[4]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declined[edit]

Campaign[edit]

State convention results[edit]

The state Democratic convention endorsed Dan Malloy for governor on May 22, 2010.

State Democratic Convention results[17]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Dannel Malloy * 1,232 67.91%
Democratic Ned Lamont * 582 32.08%
Totals 1,814 100%

* Denotes candidate met the minimum threshold of 15 percent to appear on the primary ballot

Polling[edit]

Poll source Dates administered Susan Bysiewicz Ned Lamont Dannel Malloy Jim Amann Mary Glassman Rudy Marconi
Quinnipiac August 3–8, 2010 45% 42%
Quinnipiac July 28-August 2, 2010 45% 40%
Quinnipiac July 7–13, 2010 46% 37%
Quinnipiac June 2–8, 2010 39% 22%
Quinnipiac May 24–25, 2010 41% 24%
Quinnipiac March 9–15, 2010 28% 18% 4% 2%
Quinnipiac January 14–19, 2010 27% 11% 5% 4% 1%
Quinnipiac November 3–8, 2009 26% 23% 9% 3% 1%
Quinnipiac February 5–8, 2009 44% 12% 4%

Results[edit]

In the Democratic primary, state party-endorsed candidate Dan Malloy, former mayor of Stamford, defeated businessman Ned Lamont.[18]

Democratic primary results[19]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Dannel Malloy 103,154 57.01%
Democratic Ned Lamont 77,772 42.99%
Totals 180,926 100%

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declined[edit]

Campaign[edit]

State convention results[edit]

The state Republican convention endorsed Tom Foley for governor on May 22, 2010.

State Republican Convention results[30]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Thomas C. Foley * 710 50.68%
Republican Michael Fedele * 427 30.48%
Republican Oz Griebel * 243 17.34%
Republican Lawrence DeNardis 16 1.14%
Republican C. Duffy Acevedo 5 0.36%
Totals 1,401 100%

* Denotes candidate met the minimum threshold of 15 percent to appear on the primary ballot

Polling[edit]

Poll source Dates administered Thomas C. Foley Michael Fedele Oz Griebel Mark Boughton Larry DeNardis
Quinnipiac August 3–8, 2010 38% 30% 17%
Quinnipiac July 28-August 2, 2010 41% 26% 13%
Quinnipiac July 7–13, 2010 48% 13% 7%
Quinnipiac June 2–8, 2010 39% 12% 2%
Quinnipiac May 24–25, 2010 37% 11% 5%
Quinnipiac March 9–15, 2010 30% 4% 2% 4% 2%
Quinnipiac January 14–19, 2010 17% 8% 2% 6% 4%

Results[edit]

In the Republican primary, state party-endorsed candidate Tom Foley, former U.S. Ambassador to Ireland, defeated incumbent Lieutenant Governor Michael Fedele.[18]

Republican primary results[19]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Thomas C. Foley 50,792 42.27%
Republican Michael Fedele 46,989 39.10%
Republican Oz Griebel 22,390 18.63%
Totals 120,171 100%

Running mate announcements[edit]

In Connecticut, candidates for governor and lieutenant governor are elected jointly on the same ballot line in the general election. In party primaries, however, they are nominated separately.[31] Gubernatorial candidates often select an individual to be their preferred running mate prior to any such primaries, but their running mate in the general election is ultimately at the will of their party’s primary electorate.[32]

Prior to the state conventions and primaries, three gubernatorial candidates announced who they would wish to run with if so nominated to run for governor:

Additionally, one Republican, Lisa Wilson-Foley, ran for lieutenant governor without having been selected as a running mate by a gubernatorial candidate.[31]

Prior to the Republican convention, Republican gubernatorial candidate Tom Foley decided not to name a running mate, stating that he believes that the state's tradition of a gubernatorial candidate naming a preferred running mate before party conventions and primaries is "out of date."[35] While never named a preferred running for mate himself, Foley gave praise to both Michael Fedele's choice, Mark Boughton, and Lisa Wilson-Foley (of no relation).

At their respective party conventions, Boughton[36] and Wyman[37] won their party's endorsements on May 22, though both went on to face primary challenges. In the party primaries held on August 10, both party-endorsed candidates won, with Boughton defeating Wilson-Foley for the GOP nomination and Wyman winning the Democratic nod over Glassman.[38]

General election[edit]

Candidates and running mates[edit]

Debates[edit]

On September 28, 2010, candidates Thomas C. Foley, Dannel Malloy, and Tom Marsh participated in the first gubernatorial debate of the 2010 race, a 50-minute, non-televised forum on education concerns in Hartford.[40] In the debate, Foley stated that jobs and education would be his top priorities if elected governor, that more spending is not the solution to solve education-related problems, and that Malloy has "support[ed] the status quo" of teachers' unions.[40] Malloy used the forum to advocate that schools report the amount of money spent in the classroom verses on school administration, stated that one "can be for reform and for teachers at the same time," and voiced support for a statewide universal pre-K program.[40] Marsh stated that teachers' performance standards must improve and criticized the ratio that poorly performing doctors are removed from their jobs verses the rate at which underperforming teachers are.[40]

Foley and Malloy met again two days later, on October 1, for a debate in Greenwich sponsored by the Greenwich, Stamford, and Norwalk chambers of commerce.[41]

The first televised gubernatorial debate of the 2010 campaign took place on October 5, moderated by Fox News Channel chief political correspondent Carl Cameron and aired live on Fox Connecticut.[42] Among other things in the debate in which the two opponents "clashed sharply,"[42] Foley voiced his support for retaining Connecticut's death penalty as is, pledging to veto abolishment bills placed on his desk as governor, while Malloy reiterated his opposition to capital punishment, though he stated he would not retroactively undo death sentences of individuals currently in the process.[42] The candidates also took issue with each other's records, with Malloy accusing Foley of mismanagement while CEO of a Georgia textile mill and Foley labeling Malloy as a career politician who presided as mayor of Stamford during years in which the city had net job losses.[42] State labor department figures have shown Stamford to have lost more than 5,000 net jobs during the 14-year period of Malloy's tenure as mayor.[42] The Republican and the Democrat also took issue with statements and actions taken during the election season, with Foley stating that Malloy's pledge to cut gubernatorial staff by 15 percent would amount to only approximately five positions being cut and Malloy criticizing Foley for not naming a preferred running mate for the position of lieutenant governor.[42] Malloy clarified that he had meant cutting from all positions the governor has a role in filling, stating that "about 600"[42] positions was the real figure. Foley responded to Malloy's questioning over his running mate by stating that Republican primary voters placed Danbury mayor Mark Boughton in the position as Republican nominee for lieutenant governor, not him, but praised Boughton's experience.

A second televised debate was held between the Republican and the Democrat on October 13 in New London.[43] A third, an afternoon debate broadcast live from Fairfield University on Connecticut Public Television, WFSB, and WNPR radio, occurred on October 19.[44] The candidates met for a final time on October 26 for a televised debate aired on NBC 30.[45]

Other factors[edit]

The death penalty disagreement between Foley and Malloy gained additional attention due to the contemporaneous trial, conviction, and sentencing phase (which was under deliberation in the lead-up to Election Day)[46] of Steven J. Hayes for a home invasion/murder in 2007 in Cheshire.[47]

Polling[edit]

Poll source Dates administered Dannel Malloy (D) Thomas C. Foley (R)
Rasmussen Reports October 31, 2010 46% 48%
Quinnipiac October 25–31, 2010 45% 48%
Public Policy Polling October 27–29, 2010 47% 49%
CT Capitol Report/Merriman River Group October 24–26, 2010 45.1% 45.1%
Rasmussen Reports October 24, 2010 49% 46%
Quinnipiac October 18–24, 2010 48% 43%
Suffolk University October 19–20, 2010 49% 38%
Rasmussen Reports October 14, 2010 49% 45%
Quinnipiac October 7–11, 2010 49% 42%
Fox News/Pulse Opinion Research October 9, 2010 45% 41%
Rasmussen Reports October 5, 2010 49% 44%
CNN/Time/Opinion Research Corporation October 1–5, 2010 50% 42%
CT Capitol Report/Merriman River Group October 3, 2010 47.5% 44.9%
Fox News/Pulse Opinion Research October 2, 2010 47% 41%
Quinnipiac September 21–26, 2010 45% 42%
Rasmussen Reports September 26, 2010 50% 40%
Quinnipiac September 8–12, 2010 50% 41%
Rasmussen Reports September 9, 2010 46% 39%
Rasmussen Reports August 11, 2010 48% 33%
Quinnipiac July 28-August 2, 2010 46% 31%
Quinnipiac July 7–13, 2010 44% 33%
Rasmussen Reports June 1, 2010 44% 35%
Rasmussen Reports April 1, 2010 35% 44%
Rasmussen Reports February 1, 2010 37% 36%
Quinnipiac January 14–19, 2010 37% 33%
Public Policy Polling January 4–5, 2010 37% 27%

Predictions[edit]

Source Ranking As of
Cook Political Report Toss up[2] October 31, 2010
Rothenberg Toss up[48] October 28, 2010
RealClearPolitics Toss up[49] October 27, 2010
Sabato's Crystal Ball Leans R[50] November 1, 2010
CQ Politics Toss up[51] October 27, 2010
Rasmussen Reports Toss up[52] October 31, 2010

Bridgeport ballot shortage[edit]

A dozen polling locations in the city of Bridgeport ran out of ballots on Election Day, leading to a ruling by Superior Court Judge Marshall K. Berger, Jr., for the polls to remain open at the affected polling sites until 10 p.m., two hours later than the normal statewide 8 p.m. closing time, in order for disenfranchised voters to return to vote on newly printed ballots.[53] Bridgeport officials had initially ordered only 21,000 ballots, despite there being over 69,000[53] registered voters in the city.

With all votes counted, with the exception of Bridgeport, Republican Tom Foley held a slight lead in the popular vote (556,787 to 548,378). Once the ballots from Bridgeport were counted, Democrat Dan Malloy was declared the winner by Secretary of the State Susan Bysiewicz, who, according to the Stamford Advocate, based her announcement on preliminary, "informal totals. ... That does not include uncounted absentee ballots."[54] Byseiwicz's announcement conflicted with the latest statewide tallies compiled by Foley's team and the non-partisan Associated Press, both of which indicated Foley to be in the lead by a thin margin.[54]

Judge Berger did state in his ruling that all votes submitted after 8 p.m. would be counted as provisional ballots and kept separate from the others. The state Republican Party threatened a legal challenge.[53]

On November 8, Foley, though still concerned over the election's handling and precise vote totals, conceded the election, stating, "The election on Tuesday was a conclusive victory for Dan Malloy, and this result should not be questioned."[55]

Results[edit]

Connecticut gubernatorial election, 2010[56]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Dannel Malloy 567,278 49.51% +1.406%
Republican Thomas C. Foley 560,874 48.95% -1.425%
Independent Thomas E. Marsh 17,629 1.54%
Write-ins 18 0.00%
Majority 6,404 0.56% -27.20%
Turnout 1,145,799
Democratic gain from Republican Swing

Note: Malloy also appeared on the line of the Connecticut Working Families Party and received 26,308 votes on it. His Working Families and Democratic votes have been aggregated together on this table.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Henry, Derrick (November 9, 2009). "Connecticut Governor Won’t Seek Re-election". The New York Times. Retrieved February 23, 2010. 
  2. ^ a b "2010 Governors Race Ratings". Cook Political Report. Retrieved October 31, 2010. 
  3. ^ "Race Ratings Chart: Governor". CQ Politics. Retrieved November 2, 2010. 
  4. ^ Montopoli, Brian (November 8, 2010). "Tom Foley Concedes CT Governor Race". CBS News. 
  5. ^ "Ned Lamont for Governor of Connecticut". Nedlamont.com. Retrieved 2010-08-21. 
  6. ^ "Dan Malloy for Governor of Connecticut". Danmalloy.com. Retrieved 2010-08-21. 
  7. ^ "Blumenthal Won't Run For Governor". Hartford Courant. 2009-02-03. 
  8. ^ "Bysiewicz 'Encouraged' By Blumenthal Ruling - Hartford Courant". Courant.com. October 3, 2004. Retrieved June 11, 2010. 
  9. ^ "Amann In, Williams Out". Ctlocalpolitics.net. Retrieved June 11, 2010. 
  10. ^ By Mary E. O’Leary, Special to The Register Citizen. "Susan Bysiewicz dropping run for governor, will seek AG seat- The Register Citizen News - Northwest Connecticut's Daily Newspaper". Registercitizen.com. Retrieved June 11, 2010. 
  11. ^ "> Archives > Page One > LeBeau drops out of governor's race". Journal Inquirer. February 1, 2010. Retrieved June 11, 2010. 
  12. ^ By Mary E. O’Leary, Register Topics Editor. "Amann to drop out of race for governor- The New Haven Register - Serving New Haven, Connecticut". Nhregister.com. Retrieved June 11, 2010. 
  13. ^ Keating, Christopher (May 2, 2010). "Simsbury's Glassman To Exit Governor's Race, Become Lamont's Running Mate". Hartford Courant. Retrieved May 7, 2010. 
  14. ^ Keating, Christopher (May 7, 2010). "Juan Figueroa Drops Out Of Governor's Race; Cites Raising Money As A Major Problem; No Deal For Lt. Governor". Hartford Courant Capitol Watch Blog. Retrieved May 7, 2010. 
  15. ^ "Regional Authority : Regional Authority News and Photos". Courant.com. Retrieved June 11, 2010. 
  16. ^ "Marconi drops out, endorses Lamont | The Connecticut Mirror". Ctmirror.org. May 13, 2010. Retrieved June 11, 2010. 
  17. ^ "Dems endorse Malloy, Wyman; Lamont, Glassman will primary | The Connecticut Mirror". Ctmirror.org. May 22, 2010. Retrieved June 11, 2010. 
  18. ^ a b Dixon, Ken (August 10, 2010). "Foley joins Malloy as primary winner". Connecticut Post. Retrieved August 11, 2010. 
  19. ^ a b "Election Result for Governor" (PDF). Office of the Connecticut Secretary of the State. Retrieved September 13, 2010. 
  20. ^ "Topic Galleries". Courant.com. Retrieved 2010-08-21. 
  21. ^ Cadei, Emily (2009-12-03). "Foley to Run for Connecticut Governor - The Eye (CQ Politics)". Blogs.cqpolitics.com. Retrieved 2010-08-21. 
  22. ^ "Local Elections : Local Elections News and Photos". Courant.com. 2010-08-17. Retrieved 2010-08-21. 
  23. ^ "Gov. Rell not running for re-election | WTNH.com Connecticut". Wtnh.com. Retrieved June 11, 2010. 
  24. ^ Green, Rick (November 12, 2009). "Rick Green's - CT Confidential". Blogs.courant.com. Retrieved June 11, 2010. 
  25. ^ "Regional Authority : Regional Authority News and Photos". Courant.com. Retrieved June 11, 2010. 
  26. ^ "Shays Not Running for Governor". Political Wire. February 23, 2010. Retrieved February 24, 2010. 
  27. ^ Keating, Christopher (March 30, 2010). "Newington Mayor Jeff Wright Quits Governor's Race; Running For Treasurer Against Denise Nappier". Hartford Courant Capitol Watch Blog. Retrieved March 30, 2010. 
  28. ^ a b "Fedele-Boughton ticket aiming for first-ballot victory | The Connecticut Mirror". Ctmirror.org. May 17, 2010. Retrieved June 11, 2010. 
  29. ^ By Mary E. O’Leary, Register Topics Editor. "DeNardis gears up for another campaign (video)- The New Haven Register - Serving New Haven, Connecticut". The New Haven Register. Retrieved 2010-08-21. 
  30. ^ Courant, Hartford (May 22, 2010). "Capitol Watch Blog - Connecticut Politics, Political News and Legislation". Blogs.courant.com. Retrieved June 11, 2010. 
  31. ^ a b Stuart, Christine (April 8, 2010). "Republican Announces For Lt. Gov". CT News Junkie. Retrieved June 11, 2010. 
  32. ^ "Simsbury's Glassman is Lamont's pick for lieutenant governor | Mary Glassman for Connecticut". Maryforct.com. Retrieved June 11, 2010. 
  33. ^ "Lamont, Glassman Team Up In Governor Race - Politics News Story - WFSB Hartford". Wfsb.com. May 3, 2010. Retrieved June 11, 2010. 
  34. ^ By Daniela Altimari (May 12, 2010). "Malloy Announces Wyman As Running Mate In Governor Race". Courant.com. Retrieved June 11, 2010. 
  35. ^ May 17th, 2010 (May 17, 2010). "Tom Foley’s Statement on Preferences for Lieutenant Governor | Tom Foley for Governor | Let's Get Connecticut Working Again". TomFoley2010.com. Retrieved June 11, 2010. 
  36. ^ "Danbury Mayor Boughton gets GOP nod for lieutenant governor at state convention - Connecticut Post". Ctpost.com. May 22, 2010. Retrieved June 11, 2010. 
  37. ^ "Wyman leads victors in statewide endorsements". NewsTimes. May 22, 2010. Retrieved June 11, 2010. 
  38. ^ Perrefort, Dirk (August 10, 2010). "Wyman, Boughton win lieutenant governor races". Connecticut Post. Retrieved August 10, 2010. 
  39. ^ "Stannard, Charles, "Marsh, Other Independent Candidates Qualify for the Fall Ballot"". valleynewsnow.com. August 19, 2010. Retrieved November 1, 2010. 
  40. ^ a b c d Keating, Christopher (September 29, 2010). "Dannel Malloy, Tom Foley, Tom Marsh Debate Public Education, Charter Schools, Teacher Tenure, Unions". Hartford Courant. Retrieved October 1, 2010. 
  41. ^ Chamoff, Lisa (October 1, 2010). "Foley, Malloy pull no punches in Greenwich debate". NewsTimes.com. Retrieved October 15, 2010. 
  42. ^ a b c d e f g Keating, Christopher (October 5, 2010). "Dannel Malloy And Tom Foley Clash Sharply On Death Penalty, Jobs, TV Commercials In First Televised Debate". Hartford Courant. Retrieved October 6, 2010. 
  43. ^ Keating, Christopher (October 13, 2010). "Malloy, Foley Clash Over Death Penalty In TV Debate". Hartford Courant. Retrieved October 15, 2010. 
  44. ^ Pazniokas, Mark (October 19, 2010). "Foley, Malloy behave in their third televised debate". CTMirror.org. Retrieved October 20, 2010. 
  45. ^ Keating, Christopher (October 26, 2010). "Dannel Malloy, Tom Foley Battle In Their Final TV Debate; Malloy Up By 5 In Q Poll; Foley Says It's Much Closer". Hartford Courant. Retrieved October 27, 2010. 
  46. ^ Beach, Randall, "Hayes described as 'likable klutz'", New Haven Register, October 26, 2010. Retrieved November 1, 2010.
  47. ^ Chen, David W., "In Connecticut, Big Races on the Ballot", The New York Times, October 31, 2010 (November 1, 2010 p. A28 NY ed.). Retrieved 2010-11-01.
  48. ^ "Governor Ratings". Rothenberg Political Report. Retrieved October 31, 2010. 
  49. ^ "2010 Governor Races". RealClearPolitics. Retrieved October 31, 2010. 
  50. ^ "2010 Governor Ratings". Sabato's Crystal Ball. Retrieved November 2, 2010. 
  51. ^ "Races for Governor in 2010". CQ Politics. Retrieved October 27, 2010. 
  52. ^ "Election 2010: Gubernatorial Scorecard". Rasmussen Reports. Retrieved November 1, 2010. 
  53. ^ a b c Staff Report (November 2, 2010). "Legal Challenge Possible From Bridgeport Ballot Shortage". Hartford Courant. Retrieved November 4, 2010. 
  54. ^ a b Ken Dixon and Bill Cummings (November 3, 2010). "Malloy declared winner, but Foley fights on". Stamford Advocate. Retrieved November 4, 2010. 
  55. ^ Chen, David W. (November 8, 2010). "Republican Concedes in Race for Connecticut Governor". New York Times. Retrieved September 7, 2011. 
  56. ^ http://www.ct.gov/sots/lib/sots/electionservices/statementofvote_pdfs/2010_sov.pdf

External links[edit]

Debate
Official campaign websites