Conroy Stolifter

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Conroy Stolifter
Role STOL conversion
National origin United States
Manufacturer Conroy Aircraft
First flight 1968
Introduction 1968
Status Production complete
Number built 1
Developed from Cessna 337 Super Skymaster

The Conroy Stolifter was a conversion of the Cessna 337 Super Skymaster, developed by John M. Conroy of Conroy Aircraft starting in 1968.

Development[edit]

The Stolifter was created by removing the Skymaster's rear engine and replacing the forward engine with a 575 shp (429 kW) Garrett AiResearch TPE 331-25A turboprop. The fuselage was extended to allow almost double the normal cargo volume. The aircraft was also fitted with a Robertson Aircraft Corporation STOL-kit.[1]

The aircraft was intended for a range of military and civil roles, including cargo and troop transport, medevac, reconnaissance and parachute drop.[2]

The aircraft is capable of taking off in 250 ft (76 m) and clearing a 50 ft (15 m) obstacle in 450 ft (137 m). On landing the approach speed is 51 mph (82 km/h), which a touch-down speed of 44 mph (71 km/h), giving a ground roll of as little as 200 ft (61 m).[2]

Only one Stolifter was built. The conversion was approved and the single aircraft produced was given a standard Certificate of Airworthiness. The aircraft still exists in 2009 and is based in Lyman, Washington, USA.[3]

Specifications (Stolifter)[edit]

Data from Flight International[2]

General characteristics

  • Crew: one
  • Capacity: seven passengers
  • Empty weight: 2,600 lb (1,179 kg)
  • Gross weight: 4,700 lb (2,132 kg)
  • Fuel capacity: 140 US Gallons (532 litres)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Garrett AiResearch TPE 331-25A turboprop, 575 hp (429 kW)

Performance

  • Cruise speed: 250 mph (217 kn; 402 km/h) at 20,000 feet
  • Service ceiling: 40,000 ft (12,192 m)
  • Rate of climb: 1,700 ft/min (8.6 m/s)

References[edit]

  1. ^ Goleta Air and Space Museum (undated). "Stolifter". Retrieved 2009-11-24. 
  2. ^ a b c Flight International (November 1968). "Conroy Flies Stolifter". Retrieved 2009-12-14. 
  3. ^ Federal Aviation Administration (November 2009). "FAA REGISTRY - N-Number Inquiry Result". Retrieved 2009-11-24. 

External links[edit]