Constantine Palaiologos (half-brother of Michael VIII)

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Miniature of the sebastokrator Constantine Palaiologos and his wife Eirene, from the so-called Lincoln Typicon, ca. 1350

Constantine Palaiologos (or Palaeologus) (Greek: Κωνσταντίνος Παλαιολόγος) (died 1271) was a Byzantine nobleman and the younger half-brother of the Byzantine Emperor Michael VIII Palaiologos.

Life and career[edit]

Constantine was born ca. 1230, to Andronikos Palaiologos, Grand Domestic of the Empire of Nicaea and his unknown second wife.[1]

The life of Constantine is unknown until 1259, when he was appointed Caesar by his elder half-brother, Michael VIII. The following year, he was also created a sebastokrator. He commanded the Byzantine forces on an unsuccessful campaign against the Latin Principality of Achaea, where his army was routed at the Battle of Prinitza. However, Constantine had already left the region by the time of the major Byzantine defeat at the Battle of Makryplagi in 1263/1264.[2][3]

Sometime after returning from the campaign against the Principality of Achaea, Constantine became a monk under the name Kallinikos.[4] He died in 1271.

Marriage and family[edit]

Constantine was married c. 1259/60 to a woman named Eirene Komnene Laskarina Branaina,[5] by whom he seems to have had five children"[6]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ Cheynet & Vannier 1986, p. 178.
  2. ^ Bartusis 1997, pp. 49–50.
  3. ^ Hooper, N. & Bennett, M., The Cambridge Illustrated Atlas of Warfare (1996), p. 104 Books.Google.com
  4. ^ 'Byzantine 1261-1453' from Medieval Lands by FMG and Cawley, C. Cawley, Charles, FMG.ac, Foundation for Medieval Genealogy, retrieved August 2012 ,[better source needed]
  5. ^ Pachymeres Vol I, De Michaele Palaeologo, Liber II, 5, p. 97
  6. ^ Cawley, Charles, "Byzantine 1261-1453", Foundation for Medieval Genealogy, retrieved August 2012 ,[better source needed], from Medieval Lands by FMG and Cawley, C.
  7. ^ "Typikon of Theodora Synadene for the Convent of the Mother of God Bebaia Elpis in Constantinople" (transl. Alice-Mary Talbot), 137
  8. ^ "Typikon of Theodora Synadene for the Convent of the Mother of God Bebaia Elpis in Constantinople" (transl. Alice-Mary Talbot), 138
  9. ^ 'Typikon of Theodora Synadene for the Convent of the Mother of God Bebaia Elpis in Constantinople' (trans. Alice-Mary Talbot), 139
  10. ^ "Typikon of Theodora Synadene for the Convent of the Mother of God Bebaia Elpis in Constantinople" (transl. Alice-Mary Talbot), 140
  11. ^ Pachymeres Vol II, Andronicus Palæologus, Liber V, 18, p. 407

References[edit]