Continental Cup of Curling

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Continental Cup of Curling
Contcup.jpg
Established 2001
2015 host city Calgary, Alberta
2015 arena Markin MacPhail Centre International Arena
2014 champion Team North America
Current edition
2015 Continental Cup of Curling

The Continental Cup of Curling is a curling tournament held annually between teams from North America against teams from the rest of the world. Each side is represented by six teams (three women's teams and three men's teams), and compete using a unique points system. The tournament is modeled after golf's Ryder Cup.[1]

Competition Format[edit]

Each side is represented by six teams – for the North Americans, four (two of each gender) are determined by the Canadian Curling Association based on recent participation at either the Canada Cup of Curling, the World Curling Championship, or the Olympic Winter Games. The other two North American teams are determined by the United States Curling Association. The World Curling Federation determines the six rinks representing Team World for the event.

There are four main competitions for the event, and for either side to claim the Continental Cup, a minimum majority of the points must be attained from these competitions. Prior to 2013, the minimum majority of the points was 201 points,[2] but in the new points system to be implemented in 2013, the minimum majority of the points will be 30½ points.[3]

Mixed Doubles[edit]

One of the first events is the mixed doubles event, an eight-end game with two rocks in play at the start of each end (one for each team).

Prior to 2007, each team consisted of two sweepers and two throwers, where one man and one woman was to play each position. By tradition, each men's rink was paired with a women's rink to make two teams for this event, with each mixed team being given as the names of the two throwers. All 24 players on each side were required to play in either a sweeping or throwing role in this format. Starting in 2007, however, sweepers were eliminated to create a true "doubles" game, and any sweeping is to be done by either the thrower or the skip.

According to the current rules of mixed doubles curling, two rocks, one for each team, are put in play at the start of each end. One rock is placed inside the house and the other rock is a guard. Five rocks are played per team, with scoring tallied as in team curling. One thrower must throw the first and last stones of each end, while the other thrower must throw the three stones in between. The assignment of which stones to throw by which player may be freely changed between ends, and is simply determined by who throws the first stone. Each team is given 48 minutes on the game clock, and (as an extension of the free-guard zone rule) stones may not be removed from play until the third stone in each end is thrown (effectively creating a "five-rock rule").

There is an additional concept, known as the option, given to one of the teams. The option is given to the team which did not score in the previous end (a draw to the button determine which team will have the option in the first end), and switches teams in the event of a blank end. The team with the option has the option to select which of the two rocks in play is theirs, with the hammer going to the team with the rock in the house.[2]

In the Continental Cup, there are six mixed doubles matches, with one point given for a win in each match (or a half point for both teams in the event of a tie after six ends). In the past, six points would have been given for a win, and three points would have been given for a tie. The mixed doubles games are played during the same days of competition as the team games, making up the afternoon draw. To determine the mixed doubles matchups, one captain will name a team while the other captain responds with the team that will oppose them. The right to name second alternates between the two captains through the six matchups.

The rules from this event (with the 2007 revision) were later adopted as a separate curling discipline with the inauguration of the World Mixed Doubles Curling Championship in 2008.

Results[edit]

Year Mixed doubles winner Points
2002 Europe 24–12
2003 North America 24–12
2004 North America 21–15
2006 North America 24–12
2007 North America 27–9
2008 World 27–9
2011 North America 30–6
2012 World 30–6
2013 North America 4½–1½
2013 North America 4½–1½
2014 North America 4–2

Singles[edit]

The singles competition is akin to the skills competitions found in ice hockey. There are six singles matches (three women's and three men's), with one point given to the winner of each match. In the past, four points would be given to the winner of each match, and eight bonus points would be awarded to the team with the higher aggregate score for the singles events. By convention, each of the matches pit teams against each other. Prior to 2007, one team member was to throw all six shots, while the non-throwers must sweep or skip for the thrower. Starting in 2007, however, each member of the team must make at least one shot, and no member may make more than two shots.

Each singles match is determined based on a points system (with 0 for missing the shot entirely, 1 if the shot remains in play but outside the house, and higher points based on where the shooter eventually lands, up to a maximum of 5 points if the shooter reaches the button), and the team with the higher score wins the game. Three of the shots must be in-turns, while the other three must be out-turns, with the shots set up according to their chosen type of turn. The six shots are as follows:

  • the runthrough — the shooter must hit their own center guard, which then must hit an opposing rock at the back of the button. The position of the hit guard determines the point value of the shot.
  • the draw to the button - a simple draw to the button.
  • the draw through a port - the shooter must draw their rock between two opposing rocks (a corner guard and a center guard on the opposite side of the center line). Points are only awarded if the thrown rock passes through the two opposing rocks without hitting either rock.
  • the raise - the shooter must hit their own centre guard so that the guard is raised into the house. The position of the raised guard determines the point value of the shot.
  • the hit-and-roll - the shooter must hit an opposing stone on a corner guard outside the house and then roll towards the center of the house. The hit stone must be completely removed from play in order to score points.
  • the double takeout - the shooter must remove two opposing stones, one at the top of the four-foot and one at the back of the button. Both stones must be completely removed from play in order to score points. The position of the shooter determines the point value of the shot.

To determine the singles matchups, one team captain must choose one rink while the other captain chooses the rink opposing them. One captain will choose first for the first women's matchup and the second men's matchup, while the other captain chooses first for the first men's matchup and the second women's matchup. All women's games are completed before the men's games, and all shots of one type must be completed before the next shot is done. The team throwing first in one shot (which will be the same team in all three matches) will throw second in the next shot. The right to make the first shot in the runthrough alternates between the two teams every year.

Results[edit]

Year Team winner Points Top men's team (points) Top women's team (points)
2002 Europe 24–8 Canada Kevin Martin (27) Sweden Katarina Nyberg (24)
2003 Europe 20–12 Sweden Magnus Swartling (22) Norway Marianne Haslum (15)
2004 North America 28–4 Canada Randy Ferbey (21) United States Patti Lank (20)
2006 Europe 18–14 Norway Flemming Davanger (22)
Finland Markku Uusipaavalniemi (22)
Canada Kelly Scott (22)
2007 North America 28–4 Canada Team Glenn Howard (26) Canada Team Jennifer Jones (26)
2008 World 22–10 China Team Wang Fengchun (20) China Team Wang Bingyu (18)
2011 North America 22–10 Canada Team Kevin Martin (27) Canada Team Jennifer Jones (16)
Switzerland Team Mirjam Ott (16)
2012 World 24–8 Canada Team Jeff Stoughton (25) China Team Wang Bingyu (21)
2013 North America 4-2 Canada Team Glenn Howard (22) United States Team Allison Pottinger (18)
Switzerland Team Mirjam Ott (18)
2014 World 5–1 Norway Team Thomas Ulsrud (18) Sweden Team Margaretha Sigfridsson (24)

Teams[edit]

The team games portion of the Continental Cup is highlighted by 18 eight-end curling games, with one point awarded to the winner of each game (a half point for each team if the game remains tied through eight ends).[3] Prior to 2013, there were 12 team curling games,[2] with six points awarded to the winner of each game. In the team portion, each team captain will name a rink to play on each of the three sheets of ice, with the other captain being able to choose which of their rinks will play against them. The team games are played over two or three days of competition, where the women's team matches make up the morning or afternoon draw and the men's matches make up the evening draw. The team captain that did not select first on the first day will select first on the second day.

Results[edit]

Year Team winner Points
2002 North America 48–24
2003 Europe 42–30
2004 North America 45–27
2006 Tie 36–36
2007 Tie 36–36
2008 World 45–27
2011 North America 60–12
2012 Tie 36–36
2013 North America 11–7
2014 North America 12½–5½

Skins[edit]

The final event, and the event worth the most amount of points,[2] is the skins portion. Up to 30 points can be claimed in this event, meaning that neither team can clinch the Continental Cup until the skins games are played. There are a total of five points, with half-point skins in the first six ends of the game and one-point skins in the final two ends.[3] Prior to 2013, teams could claim 260 points in the skins games, and the points were distributed in an uneven manner through each of the eight ends, resulting in a different total point value for each skins game.

In order for a team to claim a skin, the team must either score at least two points with the hammer or force a steal without the hammer. In the skins competitions, blank ends will turn the hammer over to the opposing team. If after eight ends there remain points to be claimed, a draw to the button determines which team will get the points.[2]

The points for the skins games were distributed as follows:

Points per game End
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
5 points (2013–) ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 1
20 points (2007–2012) 1 1 2 2 2 2 4 6
30 points (2002–2006) 2 2 3 3 3 4 6 7
30 points (2007–2012) 1 1 3 3 3 4 6 9
40 points (2002–2006) 2 2 4 4 5 6 7 10
55 points (2007–2012) 4 4 5 6 6 8 10 12
60 points (2002–2006) 4 4 6 6 7 9 11 13

From 2002 to 2007, there were six skins games, three men's and three women's, with the games worth 30, 40, and 60 points. The games were typically referred to as the "A", "B", and "C" games. From 2007 to 2012, eight skins games were played. Three were worth 20 points, three were worth 30 points and the remaining two were worth 55 points. Three men's skins games and three women's skins games were played, with the remaining "A" and "B" game featuring mixed teams. The teams playing in the featured games, also known as the "C" games, were required to contribute two players, one male and one female, to both mixed skins games, while the teams playing in the "A" skins game must contribute two players, one male and one female, to the "B" mixed skins game, and vice versa.

As with the team portion of the event, one captain will name a rink for each game, with the opposing captain naming the rink that will oppose them. A draw to the button determines which team will have the hammer in the first end. The matchups are not determined until the second day of competition.

The featured skins game was played on the last day of competition, while the others were played on the same day as the singles events. With the exception of the men's feature game in the 2003 cup, which was only played to seven ends with 13 points on the line in the eighth, all skins games are played to their conclusion, even if the Continental Cup has been clinched by one side partway through, or before all matches have been played (as was the case in 2007, when North America had clinched the Continental Cup before either of the feature skins game were played).

Year Skins winner Points Men's feature game Women's feature game
2002 North America 139–121 Canada Kevin Martin 43–17 Sweden Peja Lindholm Canada Colleen Jones 41–19 Sweden Elisabet Gustafson
2003 Europe 134–113 Canada Randy Ferbey 30–17 Sweden Peja Lindholm Sweden Anette Norberg 60–0 Canada Sherry Middaugh
2004 North America 134–126 Canada Randy Ferbey 47–13 Sweden Peja Lindholm Sweden Anette Norberg 41–19 Canada Colleen Jones
2006 Europe 163–97 Canada Brad Gushue 43–17 Scotland David Murdoch Sweden Anette Norberg 32–28 Canada Shannon Kleibrink
2007 North America 199–61 Canada Glenn Howard 47–8 Scotland David Murdoch Canada Kelly Scott 33–22 Scotland Kelly Wood
2008 North America 150–110 Canada Kevin Martin 40–15 Norway Thomas Ulsrud Sweden Anette Norberg 41–14 Canada Jennifer Jones
2011 North America 186–64 Canada Kevin Martin 39–16 Norway Thomas Ulsrud Canada Cheryl Bernard 42–13 China Wang Bingyu
2012 World 145–115 Norway Thomas Ulsrud 35–20 Canada Jeff Stoughton China Wang Bingyu 30–25 Canada Stefanie Lawton
2013 North America 17½–12½ Canada Glenn Howard 3–2 Norway Thomas Ulsrud Canada Jennifer Jones 4–1 Switzerland Mirjam Ott
2014 North America 18½–11½ Canada Brad Jacobs 4–1 Norway Thomas Ulsrud United States Erika Brown 3–2 Scotland Eve Muirhead

List of Continental Cups[edit]

Year Venue Canada North America United States Score United Nations World / Europe Europe
2002 Regina, Saskatchewan

Canada David Nedohin, Randy Ferbey, Scott Pfeifer, Marcel Rocque
Canada Colleen Jones, Kim Kelly, Mary-Anne Waye, Nancy Delahunt
United States Patti Lank, Erika Brown, Nicole Joraanstad, Natalie Nicholson
Canada Kelley Law, Julie Skinner, Georgina Wheatcroft, Diane Dezura
Canada Kevin Martin, Don Walchuk, Carter Rycroft, Don Bartlett
United States Paul Pustovar, Mike Fraboni, Geoff Goodland, Richard Makel

207–193
[1][4]

Switzerland Luzia Ebnöther, Carmen Küng, Tanya Frei, Nadia Röthlisberger
Sweden Elisabet Gustafson, Katarina Nyberg, Louise Marmont, Elisabeth Persson
Sweden Peja Lindholm, Tomas Nordin, Magnus Swartling, Peter Narup
Scotland Hammy McMillan, Norman Brown, Hugh Aitken, Roger McIntyre
Scotland Rhona Martin, Debbie Knox, Fiona MacDonald, Janice Rankin
Norway Pål Trulsen, Lars Vågberg, Flemming Davanger, Bent Ånund Ramsfjell

2003 Thunder Bay, Ontario

Canada Mark Dacey, Bruce Lohnes, Rob Harris, Andrew Gibson
Canada David Nedohin, Randy Ferbey, Scott Pfeifer, Marcel Rocque
United States Pete Fenson, Eric Fenson, Shawn Rojeski, John Shuster
Canada Colleen Jones, Kim Kelly, Mary-Anne Waye, Nancy Delahunt
United States Debbie McCormick, Allison Pottinger, Ann Swisshelm Silver, Tracy Sachtjen
Canada Sherry Middaugh, Kirsten Wall, Andrea Lawes, Sheri Cordina

179–208
[1][4]

Sweden Peja Lindholm, Tomas Nordin, Magnus Swartling, Peter Narup
Scotland Jackie Lockhart, Shelia Swan, Katriona Fairweather, Anne Laird
Scotland Hammy McMillan, Norman Brown, Hugh Aitken, Roger McIntyre
Norway Dordi Nordby, Hanne Woods, Marianne Haslum, Camilla Holth
Sweden Anette Norberg, Eva Lund, Cathrine Norberg, Helena Lingham
Norway Pål Trulsen, Lars Vågberg, Flemming Davanger, Bent Ånund Ramsfjell

2004 Medicine Hat, Alberta

Canada Mark Dacey, Bruce Lohnes, Rob Harris, Andrew Gibson
Canada David Nedohin, Randy Ferbey, Scott Pfeifer, Marcel Rocque
Canada Colleen Jones, Kim Kelly, Mary-Anne Waye, Nancy Delahunt
United States Patti Lank, Erika Brown, Nicole Joraanstad, Natalie Nicholson
Canada Marie-France Larouche, Karo Gagnon, Annie Lemay, Véronique Grégoire
United States Jason Larway, Doug Pottinger, Joel Larway, Bill Todhunter

228–172
[1][4]

Switzerland Luzia Ebnöther, Carmen Küng, Yvonne Schlunegger, Laurence Bidaud
Sweden Peja Lindholm, Tomas Nordin, Magnus Swartling, Peter Narup
Scotland David Murdoch, Craig Wilson, Neil Murdoch, Euan Byers
Norway Dordi Nordby, Linn Githmark, Marianne Haslum, Camilla Holth
Sweden Anette Norberg, Eva Lund, Cathrine Lindahl, Anna Bergström
Germany Sebastian Stock, Daniel Herbeg, Stephan Knoll, Patrick Hoffman

2006 Chilliwack, British Columbia

United States Pete Fenson, Shawn Rojeski, Joe Polo, Doug Pottinger
Canada Brad Gushue, Mark Nichols, Russ Howard, Jamie Korab
Canada Shannon Kleibrink, Amy Nixon, Bronwen Saunders, Christine Keshen
United States Debbie McCormick, Nicole Joraanstad, Natalie Nicholson, Tracy Sachtjen
Canada Jean-Michel Ménard, François Roberge, Éric Sylvain, Maxime Elmaleh
Canada Kelly Scott, Jeanna Schraeder, Sasha Carter, Renee Simons

171–229
[1][4]

Scotland David Murdoch, Ewan MacDonald, Peter Smith, Euan Byers
Sweden Anette Norberg, Eva Lund, Cathrine Lindahl, Anna Svärd
Switzerland Mirjam Ott, Binia Feltscher-Beeli, Valeria Spälty, Janine Greiner
Germany Andrea Schöpp, Monika Wagner, Anna Hartelt, Tina Tichatschke
Norway Pål Trulsen, Lars Vågberg, Flemming Davanger, Bent Ånund Ramsfjell
Finland Markku Uusipaavalniemi, Kalle Kiiskinen, Jani Sullanmaa, Teemu Salo

2007 Medicine Hat, Alberta

United States Todd Birr, Bill Todhunter, Greg Johnson, Kevin Birr
Canada Randy Ferbey, David Nedohin, Scott Pfeifer, Marcel Rocque
Canada Glenn Howard, Richard Hart, Brent Laing, Craig Savill
Canada Jennifer Jones, Cathy Overton-Clapham, Jill Officer, Dawn Askin
United States Debbie McCormick, Allison Pottinger, Nicole Joraanstad, Natalie Nicholson
Canada Kelly Scott, Jeanna Schraeder, Sasha Carter, Renee Simons

290–110
[1][4]

Denmark Angelina Jensen, Madeleine Dupont, Denise Dupont, Camilla Jensen
Germany Andy Kapp, Andreas Lang, Holger Höhne, Andreas Kempf
ScotlandSweden David Murdoch, Niklas Edin, Peter Smith, Euan Byers
Russia Liudmila Privivkova, Olga Zharkova, Nkeiruka Ezekh, Ekaterina Galkina
Switzerland Andreas Schwaller, Ralph Stöckli, Thomas Lips, Damian Grichting
Scotland Kelly Wood, Jackie Lockhart, Lorna Vevers, Lindsay Wood

2008 Camrose, Alberta

United States Craig Brown, Rich Ruohonen, John Dunlop, Peter Annis
Canada Stefanie Lawton, Marliese Kasner, Teejay Surik, Lana Vey
United States Debbie McCormick, Allison Pottinger, Nicole Joraanstad, Tracy Sachtjen
Canada Jennifer Jones, Cathy Overton-Clapham, Jill Officer, Dawn Askin
Canada Kevin Koe, Blake MacDonald, Carter Rycroft, Nolan Thiessen
Canada Kevin Martin, John Morris, Marc Kennedy, Ben Hebert

192–208
[1]

ScotlandSweden David Murdoch, Ewan MacDonald, Niklas Edin, Euan Byers
Sweden Anette Norberg, Kajsa Bergström, Cathrine Lindahl, Anna Svard
Switzerland Mirjam Ott, Carmen Schäfer, Valeria Spalty, Janine Greiner
Norway Thomas Ulsrud, Torger Nergård, Christoffer Svae, Havard Vad Petersson
China Wang Bingyu, Liu Yin, Yue Qingshuang, Zhou Yan
China Wang Fengchun, Liu Rui, Xu Xiaoming, Zang Jialiang

2011 St. Albert, Alberta

Canada Cheryl Bernard, Susan O'Connor, Carolyn Darbyshire, Cori Morris
United States Erika Brown, Nina Spatola, Ann Swisshelm, Laura Hallisey
United States Pete Fenson, Shawn Rojeski, Joe Polo, Ryan Brunt
Canada Jennifer Jones, Kaitlyn Lawes, Jill Officer, Dawn Askin
Canada Kevin Koe, Blake MacDonald, Carter Rycroft, Nolan Thiessen
Canada Kevin Martin, John Morris, Marc Kennedy, Ben Hebert

298–102
[5]

Sweden Niklas Edin, Sebastian Kraupp, Fredrik Lindberg, Viktor Kjäll
Scotland Switzerland Germany David Murdoch, Ralph Stöckli, Andreas Lang, Simon Strübin
Switzerland Mirjam Ott, Carmen Schäfer, Carmen Küng, Janine Greiner
Germany Andrea Schöpp, Monika Wagner, Corinna Scholz, Stella Heiss
Norway Thomas Ulsrud, Torger Nergård, Christoffer Svae, Håvard Vad Petersson
China Wang Bingyu, Liu Yin, Yue Qingshuang, Zhou Yan

2012 Langley, British Columbia

United States Pete Fenson, Shawn Rojeski, Joe Polo, Ryan Brunt
Canada Amber Holland, Kim Schneider, Tammy Schneider, Heather Kalenchuk
Canada Glenn Howard, Wayne Middaugh, Brent Laing, Craig Savill
United States Patti Lank, Nina Spatola, Caitlin Maroldo, Mackenzie Lank
Canada Stefanie Lawton, Sherry Anderson, Sherri Singler, Marliese Kasner
Canada Jeff Stoughton, Jon Mead, Reid Carruthers, Ben Hebert

165–235
[6]

Scotland Tom Brewster, Greg Drummond, Scott Andrews, Michael Goodfellow
Sweden Niklas Edin, Sebastian Kraupp, Fredrik Lindberg, Viktor Kjäll
Scotland Eve Muirhead, Anna Sloan, Vicki Adams, Claire Hamilton
Sweden Anette Norberg, Cecilia Östlund, Sara Carlsson, Liselotta Lennartsson
Norway Thomas Ulsrud, Torger Nergård, Christoffer Svae, Håvard Vad Petersson
China Wang Bingyu, Sun Yue, Yue Qingshuang, Zhou Yan

2013 Penticton, British Columbia

Canada Glenn Howard, Wayne Middaugh, Brent Laing, Craig Savill
Canada Jennifer Jones, Kaitlyn Lawes, Jill Officer, Dawn Askin
Canada Kevin Martin, John Morris, Marc Kennedy, Ben Hebert
United States Heath McCormick, Bill Stopera, Martin Sather, Dean Gemmell
Canada Heather Nedohin, Beth Iskiw, Jessica Mair, Laine Peters
United States Allison Pottinger, Nicole Joraanstad, Natalie Nicholson, Tabitha Peterson

37–23
[7]

Scotland Tom Brewster, Greg Drummond, Scott Andrews, Michael Goodfellow
Sweden Niklas Edin, Sebastian Kraupp, Fredrik Lindberg, Viktor Kjäll
Scotland Eve Muirhead, Anna Sloan, Vicki Adams, Claire Hamilton
Switzerland Mirjam Ott, Carmen Schäfer, Carmen Küng, Janine Greiner
Sweden Margaretha Sigfridsson, Maria Prytz, Christina Bertrup, Maria Wennerström
Norway Thomas Ulsrud, Torger Nergård, Christoffer Svae, Håvard Vad Petersson

2014 Las Vegas, Nevada

United States Erika Brown, Debbie McCormick, Jessica Schultz, Ann Swisshelm
Canada Rachel Homan, Emma Miskew, Alison Kreviazuk, Lisa Weagle
Canada Brad Jacobs, Ryan Fry, E. J. Harnden, Ryan Harnden
Canada Jennifer Jones, Kaitlyn Lawes, Jill Officer, Dawn McEwen
United States John Shuster, Jeff Isaacson, Jared Zezel, John Landsteiner
Canada Jeff Stoughton, Jon Mead, Reid Carruthers, Mark Nichols

36–24
[8]

Sweden Niklas Edin, Sebastian Kraupp, Fredrik Lindberg, Viktor Kjäll
Japan Satsuki Fujisawa, Miyo Ichikawa, Emi Shimizu, Chiaki Matsumura
Scotland Eve Muirhead, Anna Sloan, Vicki Adams, Claire Hamilton
Scotland David Murdoch, Tom Brewster, Greg Drummond, Scott Andrews
Sweden Margaretha Sigfridsson, Maria Prytz, Christina Bertrup, Maria Wennerström
Norway Thomas Ulsrud, Torger Nergård, Christoffer Svae, Håvard Vad Petersson

2015 Calgary, Alberta

Similar events in other sports[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]