Controversy (Prince album)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Controversy
Studio album by Prince
Released October 14, 1981
Recorded Uptown, Sunset Sound, Hollywood Sound, 1981
Genre Pop, funk, dance, new wave
Length 37:15
Label Warner Bros.
Producer Prince
Prince chronology
Dirty Mind
(1980)
Controversy
(1981)
1999
(1982)
Singles from Controversy
  1. "Controversy"
    Released: September 2, 1981
  2. "Let's Work"
    Released: January 6, 1982
  3. "Do Me, Baby"
    Released: July 16, 1982
  4. "Sexuality"
    Released: 1982
Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
Allmusic 3.5/5 stars[1]
Blender 4/5 stars[2]
Robert Christgau A−[3]
Entertainment Weekly B+[4]
Rolling Stone 4/5 stars[5]
Rolling Stone 3.5/5 stars[6]
Spin (8/10)[7]
Virgin Encyclopedia 3/5 stars[8]

Controversy is the fourth studio album by Prince, released on October 14, 1981. Keith Harris of Blender calls the album "Prince's first attempt to get you to love him for his mind, not just his body" and comments that it "refines the propulsive funk of previous albums and adds treatises on religion, work, nuclear war and Abscam."[2]

Track listing[edit]

All songs written and composed by Prince

Side one
No. Title Length
1. "Controversy"   7:15
2. "Sexuality"   4:21
3. "Do Me, Baby"   7:43
Side two
No. Title Length
4. "Private Joy"   4:29
5. "Ronnie, Talk to Russia"   1:58
6. "Let's Work"   3:54
7. "Annie Christian"   4:22
8. "Jack U Off"   3:09

Charts[edit]

Chart (1981) Peak
position
U.S. Billboard 200 21
U.S. Billboard R&B Albums 3

Personnel[edit]

  • Lisa Coleman - backing vocals (on "Controversy", "Ronnie Talk to Russia" and "Jack U Off"), keyboards ("Jack U Off")
  • Dr. Fink - keyboards ("Jack U Off")
  • Bobby Z. - drums ("Jack U Off")
  • All other vocals and instruments performed by Prince.

[9]

Singles and Hot 100 chart placings[edit]

  1. "Controversy"
  2. "When You Were Mine"
  1. "Let's Work"
  2. "Ronnie, Talk 2 Russia"
  3. "Gotta Stop (Messin' About)" (U.S. 12")
  1. "Do Me, Baby"
  2. "Private Joy"
  • "Sexuality" (German/Japan/Australia single)
  1. "Sexuality"
  2. "Controversy" (DEU, JAP)
  3. "I Wanna Be Your Lover" (AUS)

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Erlewine, Stephen Thomas. "Prince: Controversy at AllMusic. Retrieved 15 September 2011.
  2. ^ a b Harris, Keith (June–July 2001). "Every Original CD Reviewed - Prince". Blender (Alpha Media Group) (1). 
  3. ^ Christgau, Robert. "Prince". robertchristgau.com. Retrieved 15 September 2011. 
  4. ^ Browne, David (21 September 1990). "Purple Products". Entertainment Weekly (Time) (#32). ISSN 1049-0434. Retrieved 15 September 2011. 
  5. ^ Holden, Stephen (21 January 1982). "Prince: Controversy". Rolling Stone (Wenner Media) (RS 361). ISSN 0035-791X. Retrieved 15 September 2011. 
  6. ^ Hoard (2004), p. 655. Portions posted at "Prince: Album Guide". RollingStone.com. Retrieved 1 August 2012. 
  7. ^ Weisbard, Eric (10 October 1995). Spin Alternative Record Guide (1st ed.). Vintage. ISBN 978-0-679-75574-6. Retrieved 15 September 2011. 
  8. ^ Larkin, Colin (2002). The Virgin Encyclopedia of Popular Music (Concise 4 ed.). Virgin Books. ISBN 978-1-85227-923-3. Retrieved 15 September 2011. 
  9. ^ http://princevault.com/index.php/Album:_Controversy

References[edit]

  • Nathan Brackett, Christian Hoard (2004). The New Rolling Stone Album Guide: Completely Revised and Updated 4th Edition. Simon and Schuster. ISBN 0-7432-0169-8.