Conveyed concept

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Conveyed concept is a set phrase that denotes a concept as understood or perceived. If someone explains an idea or if an idea is conveyed by some type of media then that idea or concept is a conveyed concept but in the mind of the person/people to whom it was conveyed it is a concept processed within the framework of their understanding of that concept. That concept, being either poorly or precisely conveyed, is now a concept as understood or processed by whomever it was conveyed to and can be referred to as a conveyed concept.[1] [2] [3]

In computer programming a conveyed concept refers to information sent from programmer to AI, computer-to-computer, human to computer, programmer to programmer, etc. In programming an AI program, the conveyed concepts of the AI program are used as building blocks to program new concepts, and it is important that the conveyed concepts are fine tuned in order to create the correct response. In programming, programs need to compare conveyed concepts in order to communicate a correct process or response. In this media the concepts being compared are not what was programmed (the code) but the response of the program so that the code can be changed to achieve the correct response.[4][5]

Because of the abstract nature of concept when paired with the word "conveyed", the word "conveyed" transitions to a slightly different meaning than its historical Linguistic meaning in Linguistic semantics. "Conveyed" has undergone somewhat of a Semantic change in that it is used as an adjective to express the understanding by someone of something that was communicated to them.[6] This is especially true in the context of conveying meaning. In this context the actual material or words used to convey something to ‘Individual A’ is not the subject of the question - Instead, in this context, convey means what is 'Individual A's' understanding of what was conveyed.[7]

Adjective use[edit]

The conveyed concept is individual in that each person will use their cognitive process to interpret the idea or concept in their own individual way. So a conveyed concept is more than just the imparting of a concept or a concept that is conveyed. Once a concept is communicated it becomes a conveyed concept and unique to each individual. The word conveyed in the phrase conveyed concept is used as an adjective describing perception or individual meaning of a concept that has been expressed.[8] In the thought process of the person who is interpreting the concept that is being conveyed they develop or construct(Cognitive linguistics) a conveyed concept of what was conveyed to them.[9] When conveyed is used as a verb then the concept can be poorly or accurately conveyed and does not hold the same meaning.

Conveying meaning[edit]

When asked "What does this painting convey to you?", a person will answer with the conveyed concept of what they think the painting means. The same is true with any abstract information that we receive through our sensory (Sensory analysis) processes. A billboard with marketing information is the same. The information may be perceived in a number of ways. A person seeing this information may or may not buy the product or service depending on their conveyed concept of that information.[10]

In communication the conveyed meaning of words has been the subject of studies and is an intricate part of human interaction.(CSCC) [11]

Concepts[edit]

New concepts are linked to existing concepts.[12]

A caveman discovers fire by throwing a rock into a field which hits another rock and causes a spark that in turn ignites the dry grass and a fire is born. The cave man sees the fire but has no concept of what a fire is. He walks closer to it and feels the heat, he has a concept of heat and immediately links fire to heat. He walks closer and reaches his hand toward the flame and is burned. He has a concept of being burned by the heat of the sun and links being burned to his evolving concept of fire. He watches as the dry grass is consumed by the fire and understands that the fire is consuming the dry grass and connects this with his concept of consumption which is already linked to his concept of eating. As he begins linking existing concepts, concepts that are already cross-linked, he begins building a complete concept of fire. He takes off his heavy garment and places it over the flame and the flame dies out. He considers this and using existing concepts he concludes the flame needs air to live. He considers all of this and concludes that the fire was alive and that he brought it to life. The fire ate and breathed and as it did it grew so it must have been alive. Could he talk to it? If he had not placed his garment over the fire would it have walked? Although his concept of fire is nearly accurate some of his existing concepts cause him to arrive at some wrong conclusions or at least conclusions which are not entirely accurate. To him his conveyed concept of fire is valid.

Now lets assume he meets caveman2, who also has no concept of fire. Caveman1 begins to convey to him his concept of fire. Caveman2 however has a different concept of life and when he tries to link the concept of fire to life he is unable to. As the concept of fire is conveyed to him he constructs a similar concept of fire except he understands that the fire is not truly alive within the scope of his concept of life. So his conveyed concept of fire is similar but also has a stark difference.

This is also true when speaking of religion. All monotheists have a conveyed concept of God and religion, but each monothiest's conveyed concept of God differs.[13]

Not all concepts are conveyed to us. It is possible to give birth to a new concept by creating links internally.[14] But with conveyed concept we are talking about a concept being conveyed from an external media or communication and then constructing our conveyed concept based on that information and existing concepts we have developed.[15]

Example use[edit]

Consider this:

This piece of material when introduced in a specific way introduces the child to the concept of height. Once the child understands the conveyed concept they may explore that material in a multitude of ways as long as the materials are still being handled respectfully.

This piece of material when introduced in a specific way introduces the child to the concept of height. Depending on the child's conveyed concept of height, they may explore that material in a multitude of ways as long as the materials are still being handled respectfully.

If we study the first sentence we can draw a line from material to concept of height to child and then to "the conveyed concept". Because we are depending on the child's understanding of the "concept of height" in order to continue then "the conveyed concept" is the child's understanding of that concept. The word conveyed here is used as an adjective to describe what was conveyed to the student, the concept of height, but if the child still does not understand the concept of height then it could be said the concept was poorly conveyed and that the child's conveyed concept of height was incorrect. So the conveyed concept could be what was actually presented to the child so they could understand the concept of height or conveyed concept can refer to how the child perceived what was presented. This is illustrated in Concept mapping, a technique which can be used by teachers to gauge the success rate of materials used in a student's understanding of a concept. This mapping can be specific to one student or to a group but it maps the conveyed concept of the student so a teacher can fine tune their methods in trying to convey the concept.[16][17][18] The Relevance theory can further explain how each of us can perceive what is conveyed to us in different ways.[19]

External links[edit]

References and footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ Shapiro, Arthur Dr. Everybody Belongs: Changing Negative Attitudes Toward Classmates. ISBN 0-8153-3960-7.  [1]
  2. ^ Information and Cognitive Process-Peter K. Storkerson M.F.A. Ph.D.
  3. ^ On Conceptual Struggles over “Testing”-Krzysztof M. Brzezi´nski-Warsaw University of Technology
  4. ^ (page 106) Griffith University
  5. ^ Concept Based Optimization(Texas A&M University)
  6. ^ Davis, Wayne A.. Meaning, Expression, and Thought. ISBN 0-521-55513-2.  [2]
  7. ^ Millikan, Ruth Garrett. Language: A Biological Model. ISBN 0-19-928477-6.  [3]
  8. ^ Kucer, Stephen B. Kucer. Dimensions of Literacy: A Conceptual Base for Teaching Reading and. ISBN 0-8058-4941-6.  [4]
  9. ^ Oxford, Manuel García-Carpintero, Josep Macià. Two-Dimensional Semantics. ISBN 0-19-927195-X.  [5]
  10. ^ Parmerlee, David. Analyzing Markets, Products, and Marketing Plans. ISBN 0-658-00133-7.  [6]
  11. ^ Lycan, William C. Philosophy of Language: A Contemporary Introduction. ISBN 0-415-17116-4. [7]
  12. ^ NEURONS, CONCEPTS, AND CONNECTIONS IN THINKING - Arnold vander Nat
  13. ^ Concepts of God
  14. ^ Birth of a Concept
  15. ^ McGriff.pdf Steven J McGriff - Assimilation Theory
  16. ^ Attributed concept maps: fuzzy integration and fuzzy matching -[8] -
  17. ^ Concept Mapping -
  18. ^ The Role of Manipulative Materials in the Learning of Mathematical Concepts -[9]
  19. ^ Deirdre Wilson and Dan Sperber -