Cook Carillon Tower

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Cook Carillon Tower
Cook Carillon Tower.JPG
Cook Carillon Tower at Grand Valley State University-Allendale campus
General information
Type Carillon
Location Center of Allendale campus
Grand Valley State University
Coordinates 42°57′48″N 85°53′19″W / 42.963425°N 85.888595°W / 42.963425; -85.888595Coordinates: 42°57′48″N 85°53′19″W / 42.963425°N 85.888595°W / 42.963425; -85.888595
Named for Peter C. and Pat Cook
Completed 1994
Dimensions
Other dimensions 48 bells in carillon

The Cook Carillon Tower is a 10-story-tall carillon-clock tower located in the center of the Grand Valley State University-Allendale campus in Allendale, Michigan. The tower and carillon were built in 1994 with help from generous donations by Peter C. and Pat Cook for which it is named. The tower is considered to be a major icon of both the university and its campus and creates a notable central focal point on the Allendale campus.[1][2][3]

The 48 carillon bells are cast of bronze by the Royal Eijsbouts Bellfounders and Tower-clock Makers of the Netherlands. The largest bell weighs around 3,000 pounds and the smallest at just 14 pounds with sizes ranging from 51.7 to 7.5 inches. The tower itself is made of brick and stone.[1][3][4]

The carillon chimes at every quarter hour throughout the day on a set computerized play system. However, the bells are also connected to a keyboard and playing chamber located in the middle of the tower, from which a carillonneur can play.[1]

GVSU also has another carillon, the Beckering Family Carillon Tower, located on the Pew campus in Grand Rapids, Michigan.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "The Campuses - Allendale campus". Grand Valley State University. Retrieved June 27, 2010. 
  2. ^ "Carillons". World Carillon Federation. Retrieved July 8, 2010. 
  3. ^ a b "Cook Carillon Tower - Building Legacies". Grand Valley State University. Retrieved July 8, 2010. 
  4. ^ "Cook Carillon Tower". GCNA. Retrieved July 8, 2010. 
  5. ^ "Beckering Family Carillon Tower - Building Legacies". Grand Valley State University. Retrieved June 30, 2010. 

External links[edit]