Cookie Jar TV

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Cookie Jar TV
Type Defunct Saturday morning cartoon block (2006–2013)
Country United States
Availability National
Owner DIC Entertainment (2006–2008)
Cookie Jar Entertainment (2008–2012)
DHX Media (2012–2013)
Launch date
September 16, 2006 (2006-09-16) (KOL Secret Slumber Party)
September 15, 2007 (2007-09-15) (KEWLopolis)
September 19, 2009 (2009-09-19) (Cookie Jar TV)
Dissolved September 8, 2007 (2007-09-08) (KOL Secret Slumber Party)
September 12, 2009 (2009-09-12) (KEWLopolis)
September 21, 2013 (2013-09-21) (Cookie Jar TV)
Former names
KOL Secret Slumber Party (2006–2007)
KEWLopolis (2007–2009)
Affiliation CBS

Cookie Jar TV was a three-hour children's programming block on CBS. It launched on September 16, 2006 as the KOL Secret Slumber Party, the block was rebranded as KEWLopolis on September 15, 2007 and again as Cookie Jar TV on September 19, 2009. The block replaced Nick Jr. on CBS/Nick on CBS, which was programmed by Viacom's Nickelodeon before the December 2006 separation of CBS and Viacom into two separate companies. The block's final owner and programmer was DHX Media (the successor to block creator DIC Entertainment and Cookie Jar Entertainment). As KEWLopolis, the block was a tie-in with the now-defunct monthly teen magazine KEWL, which was established in part by DiC in May 2007. Cookie Jar TV ended on September 21, 2013 and was replaced by a Litton Entertainment-produced block called the "CBS Dream Team" on September 28, 2013.

History[edit]

"KOL Secret Slumber Party" logo, used from 2006 to 2007.

DIC partnership[edit]

After the announcement of the CBS/DIC partnership, the latter announced the programming block was originally going to be called CBS's Secret Saturday Morning Slumber Party (or CBS’s Saturday Morning Secret Slumber Party), but was later renamed KOL Secret Slumber Party on CBS after DIC, who produced all of the children's programming for the block, partnered with KOL, the children's area of AOL, which co-produced programming with DIC. AOL managed the programming block's website, and produced public service announcements which aired both on television and online. This alliance was what led to the name change for this block, and also because some of the programs were airing on Sundays (depending on the market).

The KOL Secret Slumber Party block's de facto hosts (and in turn, from whom the block's name was partly derived from) were the Slumber Party Girls, a teen pop group signed with Geffen Records (composed of Cassie Scerbo, Mallory Low, Karla Deras, Carolina Carattini and Caroline Scott), who appeared during commercial break bumpers and interstitial segments seen before the start and the final segment of each program as well as serving as the musical performers for one of the series featured in the block, Dance Revolution.

KEWLopolis[edit]

"KEWLopolis" logo, used from 2007 to 2009.

In mid-2007, KOL withdrew sponsorship of the block.[1] Afterwards, CBS and DIC announced a new partnership with American Greetings Corporation to produce the new KEWLopolis, a cartoon block aimed at young female children.

Cookie Jar Group[edit]

On July 23, 2008, DIC was acquired by the Cookie Jar Group.[2][3] On February 24, 2009, it was announced that CBS renewed its contract with Cookie Jar for another three seasons, through 2012.[4][5] While KEWLopolis was willing to carry Cake and Horseland over from KOL Secret Slumber Party, Cookie Jar TV removed all KEWLopolis programming upon its rebranding on September 19, 2009. The Cookie Jar brand remained even after that company was acquired by DHX Media in October 2012.

On July 24, 2013, CBS announced a programming agreement with Litton Entertainment (which already programs a Saturday morning block for ABC in the form of a syndication package exclusive to that network's stations) to launch a new Saturday morning block featuring live-action reality-based series. As a result, the Cookie Jar TV block was discontinued on September 21, 2013, to be replaced the following week on September 28 by the Litton-produced CBS Dream Team, which will be aimed at teenagers 13 to 16 years old,[6] making the network's return to live-action programming only since 1998. CBS strictly went to live-action programming from September 1997 to September 1998. This was the second time in at least 50 years that CBS dropped animated cartoons from their schedule.

Programming[edit]

All programming in the block was in compliance with federal E/I requirements as mandated by the Federal Communications Commission. Though the block is intended to air on Saturday mornings, like its predecessors, some CBS affiliates chose to split the block into two segments by tape-delaying 30 minutes to one hour of the block to air in a different weekend timeslot (usually on Sunday mornings) to accommodate extended local news or local interest paid programming.

Former programing[edit]

(all shows are E/I):[7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ CBS Blocks Out KEWLopolis, Animation Magazine, August 23, 2007
  2. ^ "COOKIE JAR AND DIC ENTERTAINMENT TO MERGE, CREATING INDEPENDENT GLOBAL CHILDREN'S ENTERTAINMENT AND EDUCATION POWERHOUSE". Cookie Jar Group. 2008-06-20. Retrieved 2008-12-23. 
  3. ^ "COOKIE JAR ENTERTAINMENT EXPANDS BRAND PORTFOLIO, TALENT AND GLOBAL REACH WITH CLOSING OF DIC TRANSACTION". Cookie Jar Group. 2008-07-23. Retrieved 2008-12-23. 
  4. ^ "CBS Reups With Kids Programmer Cookie Jar". Broadcasting & Cable. February 24, 2009. Retrieved 2009-02-26. 
  5. ^ "CBS RENEWS COOKIE JAR ENTERTAINMENT'S SATURDAY MORNING BLOCK FOR THREE MORE SEASONS". Cookie Jar Group. February 24, 2009. Retrieved 2009-03-25. 
  6. ^ James, Meg (July 24, 2013). "CBS partners with Litton Entertainment for Saturday teen block". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved July 25, 2013. 
  7. ^ "CBS AND COOKIE JAR ENTERTAINMENT PRESENT THE NEW CHILDREN'S EDUCATIONAL AND INFORMATIONAL PROGRAMMING SCHEDULE FOR "COOKIE JAR TV" PREMIERING SATURDAY, SEPT. 17". Cookie Jar Group. September 6, 2011. Retrieved September 18, 2011.