Copper(I) phosphide

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Copper(I) phosphide
Cu3Pstructure.jpg
Identifiers
CAS number 12019-57-7
PubChem 159399
Properties
Molecular formula Cu3P
Molar mass 221.6127 g/mol
Appearance yellowish grey crystals
Melting point 900 °C
Structure
Crystal structure Hexagonal, hP24
Space group P63cm, No. 185
Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C (77 °F), 100 kPa)
 YesY (verify) (what is: YesY/N?)
Infobox references

Copper phosphide, Cu3P, also copper(I) phosphide, cuprous phosphide, cuprophosphorus and phosphor copper, is a compound of copper and phosphorus, a phosphide of copper. It has the appearance of yellowish-grey very brittle mass of crystalline structure. It does not react with water.

Copper phosphide has a role in copper alloys, namely in phosphor bronze. It is a very good deoxidizer of copper.

Copper phosphide can be produced in a reverberatory furnace or in a crucible, e.g. by a reaction of red phosphorus with a copper-rich material. It can also be prepared photochemically, by irradiating cupric hypophosphite with ultraviolet radiation.[1]

When subjected to ultraviolet light, copper phosphide shows fluorescence.

A blue-black film of copper phosphide forms on white phosphorus when subjected to a solution of copper salt; wounds containing particles of phosphorus therefore have to be washed with 1% solution of copper sulfate. The particles then can be easily removed, which is helped by their fluorescence. Formation of protective layer of copper phosphide is also used in cases of phosphorus ingestion, when gastric lavage with copper sulfate is employed as part of the cure.[2]

References[edit]