Corbin City, New Jersey

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Corbin City, New Jersey
City
City of Corbin City
Map of Corbin City in Atlantic County
Map of Corbin City in Atlantic County
Census Bureau map of Corbin City, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Corbin City, New Jersey
Coordinates: 39°18′06″N 74°45′37″W / 39.30162°N 74.76024°W / 39.30162; -74.76024Coordinates: 39°18′06″N 74°45′37″W / 39.30162°N 74.76024°W / 39.30162; -74.76024[1][2]
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Atlantic
Incorporated March 11, 1922
Government[3]
 • Type Faulkner Act (Mayor-Council)
 • Mayor Kelly Camp (term ends December 31, 2016)[4]
 • Clerk Joanne Siedlecki[5]
Area[1]
 • Total 8.940 sq mi (23.156 km2)
 • Land 7.665 sq mi (19.853 km2)
 • Water 1.275 sq mi (3.303 km2)  14.26%
Area rank 221st of 566 in state
12th of 23 in county[1]
Elevation[6] 0 ft (0 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9]
 • Total 492
 • Estimate (2014)[10] 494
 • Rank 557th of 566 in state
23rd of 23 in county[11]
 • Density 64.2/sq mi (24.8/km2)
 • Density rank 552nd of 566 in state
22nd of 23 in county[11]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08270[12]
Area code(s) 609[13]
FIPS code 3400115160[1][14][15]
GNIS feature ID 0885192[1][16]
Website www.ci.corbincity.nj.us

Corbin City is a city in Atlantic County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the city's population was 492,[7][8][9] reflecting an increase of 24 (+5.1%) from the 468 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 56 (+13.6%) from the 412 counted in the 1990 Census.[17]

Corbin City was incorporated as a city by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 11, 1922, from portions of Weymouth Township.[18]

History[edit]

The city has been one of several New Jersey municipalities that have considered consolidation. Corbin City announced it 2008 that it was investigating a prospective merger with neighboring Upper Township, across the county line in Cape May County, citing proximity and that Corbin City's children already attend Upper Township schools.[19] There are no municipalities within New Jersey that have incorporated lands within multiple counties, and by 2010 Cape May County's Board of Chosen Freeholders objected to the plan, citing an analysis that the added costs of serving Corbin City would exceed revenues.[20]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city had a total area of 8.940 square miles (23.156 km2), including 7.665 square miles (19.853 km2) of land and 1.275 square miles (3.303 km2) of water (14.26%).[2]

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the city include Buck Hill and Rock Point.[21]

The city is one of 56 South Jersey municipalities that are included within the New Jersey Pinelands National Reserve, a protected natural area of unique ecology covering 1,100,000 acres (450,000 ha), that has been classified as a United States Biosphere Reserve and established by Congress in 1978 as the nation's first National Reserve.[22] All of the city is included either in the state-designated Pinelands area (which includes portions of Atlantic County, along with areas in Burlington, Camden, Cape May, Cumberland, Gloucester and Ocean counties) or in the Pinelands National Reserve.[23]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1930 256
1940 220 −14.1%
1950 238 8.2%
1960 271 13.9%
1970 258 −4.8%
1980 254 −1.6%
1990 412 62.2%
2000 468 13.6%
2010 492 5.1%
Est. 2014 494 [10][24] 0.4%
Population sources:
1930-2000[25] 1930[26]
1930-1990[27] 2000[28][29] 2010[7][8][9]

Corbin City is the least-populous city in New Jersey. While there are municipalities with smaller populations, they are either boroughs, towns, townships or villages.[30]

2010 Census[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 492 people, 185 households, and 130.1 families residing in the city. The population density was 64.2 per square mile (24.8/km2). There were 212 housing units at an average density of 27.7 per square mile (10.7/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 97.56% (480) White, 0.41% (2) Black or African American, 0.00% (0) Native American, 1.22% (6) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 0.61% (3) from other races, and 0.20% (1) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 3.46% (17) of the population.[7]

There were 185 households, of which 30.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.0% were married couples living together, 10.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.7% were non-families. 24.9% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.66 and the average family size was 3.18.[7]

In the city, 23.2% of the population were under the age of 18, 9.1% from 18 to 24, 25.8% from 25 to 44, 29.7% from 45 to 64, and 12.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39.1 years. For every 100 females there were 96.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.9 males.[7]

2000 Census[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[14] there were 468 people, 172 households, and 120 families residing in the city. The population density was 59.3 people per square mile (22.9/km2). There were 204 housing units at an average density of 25.9 per square mile (10.0/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 94.02% White, 2.78% African American, 0.85% Native American, 1.28% Asian, 0.64% from other races, and 0.43% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.99% of the population.[28][29]

There were 172 households out of which 37.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.4% were married couples living together, 8.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.7% were non-families. 22.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.72 and the average family size was 3.21.[28][29]

In the city the population was spread out with 29.9% under the age of 18, 4.9% from 18 to 24, 29.3% from 25 to 44, 25.4% from 45 to 64, and 10.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 98.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 105.0 males.[28][29]

The median income for a household in the city was $47,083, and the median income for a family was $56,000. Males had a median income of $35,938 versus $27,250 for females. The per capita income for the city was $21,321. None of the families and 4.9% of the population were living below the poverty line, including no under eighteens and 17.0% of those over 64.[28][29]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Corbin City operates within the Faulkner Act (formally known as the Optional Municipal Charter Law) under the Mayor-Council form of New Jersey municipal government.[31] The city's governing body consists of a Mayor and a three-member City Council. The City Council consists of three members elected at-large to three-year terms in office on a staggered basis, with one seat coming up for election each year as part of the November general election.[3][32]

As of 2015, the Mayor of Corbin City is Kelly Camp, whose term of office ends December 31, 2016. Members of the City Council are Council President William F. Collins (R, 2017), Thomas Bennis (R, 2015) and Rose Turner (R, 2016).[33][34][35][36][37][38]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Corbin City is located in the 2nd Congressional District[39] and is part of New Jersey's 1st state legislative district.[8][40][41] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Corbin City had been in the 2nd state legislative district.[42]

New Jersey's Second Congressional District is represented by Frank LoBiondo (R, Ventnor City).[43] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark, term ends 2021)[44] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus, 2019).[45][46]

The 1st Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Jeff Van Drew (D, Dennis Township) and in the General Assembly by Bob Andrzejczak (D, Middle Township) and Sam Fiocchi (R, Vineland).[47] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[48] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[49]

Atlantic County is governed by a directly elected executive and a nine-member Board of Chosen Freeholders, responsible for legislation. The executive serves a four-year term and the freeholders are elected to staggered three-year terms, of which four are elected from the county on an at-large basis and five of the freeholders represent equally populated districts.[50][51] As of 2015, Atlantic County's Executive is Republican Dennis Levinson, whose term of office ends December 31, 2015.[52] Members of the Board of Chosen Freeholders are Chairman Frank D. Formica, Freeholder District 2, including Atlantic City (part), Egg Harbor Township (part), Linwood, Longport, Margate, Northfield, Somers Point and Ventnor (R, 2015),[53] Vice Chairman James A. Bertino, Freeholder District 5, including Buena Borough, Buena Vista Township, Corbin City, Egg Harbor City, Estell Manor, Folsom, Hamilton Township (part), Hammonton, Mullica Township and Weymouth (R, 2015),[54] Colin G. Bell, Freeholder At-Large (R, 2015),[55] John Carman, Freeholder District 3, including Egg Harbor Township (part) and Hamilton Township (part) (R, 2017),[56] Ernest D. Coursey, Freeholder District 1, including Atlantic City (part), Egg Harbor Township (part) and Pleasantville (R, 2016),[57] Richard Dase, Freeholder District 4, including Absecon, Brigantine, Galloway Township and Port Republic (D, 2016),[58] Alexander C. Marino, Freeholder At-Large (R, 2017),[59] Will Pauls, Freeholder At-Large (R, 2016)[60] and John W. Risley, Freeholder At-Large (R, 2017).[61][62][63] Constitutional officers are County Clerk Edward P. McGettigan (2016),[64] Sheriff Frank X. Balles (R, 2017)[65] and Surrogate James Curcio (2015).[66][67]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 303 registered voters in Corbin City, of which 54 (17.8% vs. 30.5% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 135 (44.6% vs. 25.2%) were registered as Republicans and 114 (37.6% vs. 44.3%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were no voters registered to other parties.[68] Among the city's 2010 Census population, 61.6% (vs. 58.8% in Atlantic County) were registered to vote, including 80.2% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 76.6% countywide).[68][69]

In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 138 votes (58.0% vs. 41.1% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 91 votes (38.2% vs. 57.9%) and other candidates with 7 votes (2.9% vs. 0.9%), among the 238 ballots cast by the city's 315 registered voters, for a turnout of 75.6% (vs. 65.8% in Atlantic County).[70][71] In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 150 votes (62.5% vs. 41.6% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 85 votes (35.4% vs. 56.5%) and other candidates with 5 votes (2.1% vs. 1.1%), among the 240 ballots cast by the city's 317 registered voters, for a turnout of 75.7% (vs. 68.1% in Atlantic County).[72] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 143 votes (63.8% vs. 46.2% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 77 votes (34.4% vs. 52.0%) and other candidates with 1 vote (0.4% vs. 0.8%), among the 224 ballots cast by the city's 278 registered voters, for a turnout of 80.6% (vs. 69.8% in the whole county).[73]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 134 votes (68.4% vs. 60.0% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 50 votes (25.5% vs. 34.9%) and other candidates with 5 votes (2.6% vs. 1.3%), among the 196 ballots cast by the city's 324 registered voters, yielding a 60.5% turnout (vs. 41.5% in the county).[74][75] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 95 votes (58.3% vs. 47.7% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 60 votes (36.8% vs. 44.5%), Independent Chris Daggett with 6 votes (3.7% vs. 4.8%) and other candidates with no votes (0.0% vs. 1.2%), among the 163 ballots cast by the city's 308 registered voters, yielding a 52.9% turnout (vs. 44.9% in the county).[76]

Education[edit]

Corbin City is a non-operating school district.[77] Students attend public school for Kindergarten through eighth grade in the Upper Township School District, as part of a sending/receiving relationship.[78][79] Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[80]) are Upper Township Primary School[81] (K-2; 449 students), Upper Township Elementary School[82] (3-5; 463) and Upper Township Middle School[83] (6-8; 518).[84]

High school students in public school for ninth through twelfth grades attend to Ocean City as part of a sending/receiving relationship with the Ocean City School District.[79][85] Ocean City High School had an enrollment of 1,242 students as of the 2010-11 school year.[86]

Students from Corbin City, and all of Atlantic County, have the option to attend the career technical programs and full-time career academies offered by the Atlantic County Institute of Technology located in the Mays Landing section of Hamilton Township[87] or the Charter-Tech High School for the Performing Arts, located in Somers Point.[88]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

As of May 2010, the city had a total of 10.44 miles (16.80 km) of roadways, of which 3.52 miles (5.66 km) were maintained by the municipality, 4.55 miles (7.32 km) by Atlantic County and 2.37 miles (3.81 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[89]

Route 50 is the main road that passes through the city. The Garden State Parkway is accessible in neighboring Upper Township.

Public transportation[edit]

New Jersey Transit provide bus service in the township on the 315 route that runs between Cape May and Philadelphia.[90][91]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e 2010 Census Gazetteer Files: New Jersey County Subdivisions, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2015.
  2. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  3. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 13.
  4. ^ 2014 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs, as of December 15, 2014. Accessed February 14, 2015. As of date accessed, Camp is listed as mayor with a term-end date of January 1, 2016.
  5. ^ Officials, City of Corbin City. Accessed July 9, 2013.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: City of Corbin City, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 5, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Corbin City city, Atlantic County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 15, 2012.
  8. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 1. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Corbin City city, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed May 15, 2012.
  10. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014 - 2014 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2015.
  11. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 11, 2012.
  12. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Corbin City, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed May 15, 2012.
  13. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Corbin City, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed February 14, 2015.
  14. ^ a b American FactFinder, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  15. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed May 15, 2012.
  16. ^ US Board on Geographic Names, United States Geological Survey. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  17. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed July 9, 2013.
  18. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 68. Accessed May 15, 2012.
  19. ^ Little choice for small New Jersey towns but to merge. PhillyBurbs.com. Accessed May 26, 2008.
  20. ^ Staff. "Corbin City, smallest N.J. town, tries to keep its way of life", The Star-Ledger, June 10, 2010. Accessed January 23, 2015. "However, the plan's main recommendation, merging with Upper Township, was opposed by Cape May County freeholders, since providing services to Corbin City costs more than its tax base."
  21. ^ Locality Search, State of New Jersey. Accessed May 21, 2015.
  22. ^ The Pinelands National Reserve, New Jersey Pinelands Commission. Accessed November 18, 2013.
  23. ^ Pinelands Municipalities, New Jersey Pinelands Commission, April 2003. Accessed November 18, 2013.
  24. ^ Census Estimates for New Jersey April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2015.
  25. ^ Barnett, Bob. Population Data for Atlantic County Municipalities, 1840 - 2000, WestJersey.org. December 6, 2010. Accessed March 21, 2013.
  26. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 714. Accessed May 15, 2012.
  27. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network. Accessed May 15, 2012.
  28. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Corbin City city, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 9, 2013.
  29. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Corbin City city, Atlantic County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 9, 2013.
  30. ^ "THE PRESS ANSWER GUY", The Press of Atlantic City, February 20, 2005. Accessed August 10, 2007. "Another town, Corbin City, is the smallest city. In 2000's census, only 468 people lived there."
  31. ^ Forms of Municipal Government in Atlantic County, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed November 17, 2013.
  32. ^ Staff. "Corbin City Profile", The Press of Atlantic City, November 12, 1993. Accessed May 15, 2012. "GOVERNMENT Form: Mayor/Council"
  33. ^ City Officials, City of Corbin City. Accessed February 15, 2015.
  34. ^ 2013 Municipal Data Sheet, City of Corbin City. Accessed November 17, 2013.
  35. ^ Municipal Governments in Atlantic County, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed November 17, 2013.
  36. ^ Atlantic County GENERAL ELECTION - UNOFFICIAL RESULTS November 4, 2014, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed February 15, 2015.
  37. ^ Atlantic County General Election November 5, 2013, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed February 15, 2015.
  38. ^ Atlantic County General Election November 6, 2012, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed November 17, 2013.
  39. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  40. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 56, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  41. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  42. ^ 2011 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 56, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  43. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  44. ^ About Cory Booker, United States Senate. Accessed January 26, 2015. "He now owns a home and lives in Newark's Central Ward community."
  45. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate, January 26, 2015. "He currently lives in Paramus and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  46. ^ Senators of the 114th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed January 26, 2015. "Booker, Cory A. - (D - NJ) Class II; Menendez, Robert - (D - NJ) Class I"
  47. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  48. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  49. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  50. ^ 2013 Atlantic County District Map, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed March 7, 2015.
  51. ^ Board of Chosen Freeholders, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed March 7, 2015.
  52. ^ County Executive, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed March 7, 2015.
  53. ^ Frank D. Formica, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed March 7, 2015.
  54. ^ James A. Bertino, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed March 7, 2015.
  55. ^ Colin G. Bell, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed March 7, 2015.
  56. ^ John Carman, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed March 7, 2015.
  57. ^ Ernest D. Coursey, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed March 7, 2015.
  58. ^ Richard Dase, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed March 7, 2015.
  59. ^ Alexander C. Marino, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed March 7, 2015.
  60. ^ Will Pauls, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed March 7, 2015.
  61. ^ John W. Risley, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed March 7, 2015.
  62. ^ Atlantic County Board of Chosen Freeholders, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed March 7, 2015.
  63. ^ 2014 Atlantic County Board of Chosen Freeholders, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed March 7, 2015.
  64. ^ Ed McGettigan, Atlantic County Clerk. Accessed March 7, 2015.
  65. ^ Frank X. Balles, Sheriff, Atlantic County Sheriff's Office. Accessed March 7, 2015.
  66. ^ Atlantic County Surrogate's Court, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed March 7, 2015.
  67. ^ Constitutional Officers, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed March 7, 2015.
  68. ^ a b Voter Registration Summary - Atlantic, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed December 24, 2014.
  69. ^ GCT-P7: Selected Age Groups: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision; 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 24, 2014.
  70. ^ Presidential November 6, 2012 General Election Results - Atlantic County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 15, 2013. Accessed December 24, 2014.
  71. ^ Number of Registered Voters and Ballots Cast November 6, 2012 General Election Results - Atlantic County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 15, 2013. Accessed December 24, 2014.
  72. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Atlantic County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed December 24, 2014.
  73. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Atlantic County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed December 24, 2014.
  74. ^ 2013 Governor: Atlantic County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, January 29, 2014. Accessed December 24, 2014.
  75. ^ Number of Registered Voters and Ballots Cast November 5, 2013 General Election Results : Atlantic County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, January 29, 2014. Accessed December 24, 2014.
  76. ^ 2009 Governor: Atlantic County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed December 24, 2014.
  77. ^ 13 Non-Operating School Districts Eliminated, New Jersey Department of Education press release dated July 1, 2009. Accessed November 17, 2013. "The remaining 13 non-operating districts that will be addressed at a later date are Longport (Atlantic), Corbin City (Atlantic), Rockleigh (Bergen), Teterboro (Bergen), Pine Valley (Camden), Chesilhurst (Camden), Hi Nella (Camden), Cape May Point (Cape May), West Wildwood (Cape May), Newfield (Gloucester), Allenhurst (Monmouth), Interlaken (Monmouth), and Lake Como (Monmouth)."
  78. ^ School Board, City of Corbin City. Accessed November 17, 2013 "Corbin City is a Type 1 non-operating school district. Elementary students attend Upper Township Schools and High school students attend Ocean City High School."
  79. ^ a b Procida, Lee. "Corbin City, the smallest town in New Jersey, fights to preserve 'paradise'", The Press of Atlantic City, June 10, 2010. Accessed May 15, 2012. "Corbin City has all that. More than 70 percent of its 5,063 acres is preserved open space, and a winding river lines it southern border. Its children go to Upper Township elementary and middle schools and then to Ocean City for high school."
  80. ^ School Data for the Upper Township School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed November 17, 2013.
  81. ^ Upper Township Primary School, Upper Township School District. Accessed November 17, 2013.
  82. ^ Upper Township Elementary School, Upper Township School District. Accessed November 17, 2013.
  83. ^ Upper Township Middle School, Upper Township School District. Accessed November 17, 2013.
  84. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Upper Township School District, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed November 17, 2013.
  85. ^ Ocean City High School 2014 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed February 15, 2015. "Ocean City High School is a comprehensive high school serving the communities of Ocean City, Upper Township, Sea Isle City, and Corbin City, with an enrollment of over 1,250 students."
  86. ^ School Data for Ocean City High School, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed November 17, 2013.
  87. ^ About Us, Atlantic County Institute of Technology. Accessed November 20, 2013.
  88. ^ Profile, Charter-Tech High School for the Performing Arts. Accessed November 20, 2013.
  89. ^ Atlantic County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed November 17, 2013.
  90. ^ Atlantic County Bus / Rail Connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of July 26, 2010. Accessed November 17, 2013.
  91. ^ South Jersey Transit Guide, Cross County Connection, as of April 1, 2010. Accessed November 17, 2013.

External links[edit]