Cordyline stricta

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Slender Palm Lily
Cordyline stricta West Pennant Hills.jpg
Cordyline stricta at West Pennant Hills, Australia
Scientific classification e
Kingdom: Plantae
Clade: Angiosperms
Clade: Monocots
Order: Asparagales
Family: Asparagaceae
Subfamily: Lomandroideae
Genus: Cordyline
Species: C. stricta
Binomial name
Cordyline stricta
(Sims) Endl.[1]
Synonyms[2][3][4]

Dracaena stricta Sims (basionym)
Charlwoodia stricta (Sims) Sweet
Terminalis stricta (Sims) Kuntze

Cordyline stricta, known as the Slender Palm Lily,[5] or Narrow-leaved Palm Lily[6] (not to be confused with C. congesta, which is also known by this common name) is an evergreen Australian plant. A shrub to 5 metres tall found in wet sclerophyll forest and rainforest, usually on the coastal lowlands. From near Bilpin, New South Wales further north to Queensland.[6] C. stricta has become naturalised in Victoria.[7]

Description[edit]

Leaves are long and thin, 30 to 50 cm long, 1 to 2 cm wide. Mauve flowers form on panicles, 20 to 40 cm long. The flowering stem is 15 to 30 cm long. Fruit are purple to black, 10 to 15 mm in diameter. This is the only Australian species with black fruit.[6]

Uses[edit]

Gardening[edit]

Cordyline stricta is planted in gardens for its ornamental value.

Ecological[edit]

Cordyline stricta is a host plant for Yellow-streaked Swift caterpillars.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^  This plant, as treated by the Austrian botanist Stephan Endlicher as Cordyline stricta, was published in Annalen des Wiener Museums der Naturgeschichte, 1: 162. 1836. "Name - Cordyline stricta (Sims) Endl.". Tropicos. Saint Louis, Missouri: Missouri Botanical Garden. Retrieved 15 June 2011. 
  2. ^  Cordyline stricta was first described and published by botanist John Sims under the name Dracaena stricta, its basionym, in Botanical Magazine, 52: t. 2575. 1825. "Name - Dracaena stricta Sims". Tropicos. Saint Louis, Missouri: Missouri Botanical Garden. Retrieved 15 June 2011. 
  3. ^  Charlwoodia stricta was published in Flora Australasica, t. 18. 1827. "Name - Charlwoodia stricta (Sims) Sweet". Tropicos. Saint Louis, Missouri: Missouri Botanical Garden. Retrieved 15 June 2011. 
  4. ^  Terminalis stricta was published by the German botanist Otto Kuntze in Revisio Generum Plantarum, 2: 716. 1891. "Name - Terminalis stricta (Sims) Kuntze". Tropicos. Saint Louis, Missouri: Missouri Botanical Garden. Retrieved 15 June 2011. 
  5. ^ a b Don Herbison-Evans & Stella Crossley (6 July 2009). "Sabera dobboe (Plotz, 1885)". Coffs Harbour Butterfly House website. Bonville, NSW, Australia. Retrieved 15 June 2011. 
  6. ^ a b c G. J. Harden (1993). "Cordyline stricta Sims (Endl.)". PlantNET - NSW Flora Online. Retrieved 15 June 2011. 
  7. ^  GRIN (16 February 1996). "Cordyline stricta information from NPGS/GRIN". Taxonomy for Plants. National Germplasm Resources Laboratory, Beltsville, Maryland: USDA, ARS, National Genetic Resources Program. Retrieved 15 June 2011.