Cork GAA

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Cork GAA
Cork GAA.jpg
Irish: Cumann Luthchleas Gael Corcaigh
Province: Munster
Nickname(s): The Rebels
The People's Republic
The Rebel County
Leesiders
The Blood and Bandage
The Rebelettes (Ladies Gaa)
County colours: Red and White
Ground(s): Páirc Uí Chaoimh, Cork
Standard kit

The Cork County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) (Irish: Cumann Luthchleas Gael Coiste Contae Chorcaí) or Cork GAA is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic games in County Cork and the Cork inter-county teams. It is one of the constituent counties of Munster GAA.

Cork's traditional colours are red & white, however, it was not always this way. In the early days the county wore a blue-coloured jersey with a saffron-coloured 'C' emblazoned on the chest. All this changed in 1919 when Cork were preparing to play Dublin in the All-Ireland Hurling Final. In the week leading up to the game, British forces broke into the county board offices on Maylor Street in the city centre and seized all of Cork's jerseys. Because of this the county board borrowed jerseys from the now-defunct Father O'Leary Temperance Association team. Cork went on to win the game, ending a sixteen-year barren spell. Because of this win Cork decided to wear the 'lucky' red jerseys in all future games.

Colours and symbols[edit]

Cork's original colours (1888–1919)

The red and white colour scheme that has been worn since has carried a psychological impact for opposing teams. This has led to the Cork strip being nicknamed the blood and bandage. A colour clash with Louth in the 1957 All-Ireland Football Final saw Cork wear the blue jerseys once again, however, on this occasion it was the blue jersey of the province of Munster. In 1976 Cork's footballers became involved in an incident known as 'the three stripes affair.' Before the Munster football final Cork were offered a set of Adidas jerseys. The use of these jerseys caused controversy as it seemed to undermine the promotion of Irish manufacturers.

Cork's alternative colours are traditionally white jerseys and white shorts. These were most famously worn in the 1973 All-Ireland Football Final when Cork defeated Galway to take their fourth title. They were worn again in 2010 when Cork defeated Down in the All-Ireland final. Since then, Cork have generally worn their traditional red jerseys on all occasions.

The current Cork GAA badge is based around the traditional coat of arms of Cork city. It features the King's old castle and the Queen's old castle with the Shandon Steeple in between. The badge also features a hurley and a football.

Gaelic football[edit]

Gaelic football in County Cork is overseen by the Cork County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association. At present, there are 115 registered Gaelic football clubs in County Cork. Cork senior football team represents the county in the All-Ireland Senior Football Championship.

Hurling[edit]

Hurling in County Cork is overseen by the Cork County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association. At present, there are 93 registered hurling clubs in County Cork. Cork senior hurling team represents the county in the All-Ireland Senior Hurling Championship.

Camogie[edit]

Camogie in County Cork is overseen by the Cork County Board of the Camogie Association. Cork senior camogie team represents the county in the All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship.

Ladies' Gaelic football[edit]

Ladies' football in County Cork is overseen by the Cork County Board of the Ladies' Gaelic Football Association. At present, there are 11 registered ladies' football clubs in County Cork.[1] Cork senior ladies' football team represents the county in the All-Ireland Senior Ladies' Football Championship.

Gaelic handball[edit]

Handball in County Cork is overseen by the Cork Handball Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association.

Rounders[edit]

Rounders in County Cork is overseen by the Cork County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association.

Sponsorship[edit]

Cork were for 15 years sponsored by O2. This came to an end on 31 December 2012.[2] In 2013 Chill Insurance announced they were to sponsor Cork on a three year deal.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Cork ladies' football". 
  2. ^ "Cork GAA and 02 to part ways". RTÉ Sport. 31 October 2012. Retrieved 31 October 2012. 
  3. ^ "Boost for Cork as Chill Insurance announce bumper 1 million three year deal". Irish Independent. 5 March 2013. Retrieved 5 March 2013.