Corn Bowl

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Corn Bowl (defunct)
Corn Bowl
Location Bloomington, Illinois
Previous locations Normal, Illinois
Operated 1947–1955
Sponsors
Hybrid Seed Corn Breeders of Illinois
Bloomington American Legion

The Corn Bowl was a college football bowl game played from 1947 until 1955 in central Illinois. The first game was played November 27, 1947[1] in Normal, Illinois between Southern Illinois and North Central College. Its final game was played November 24, 1955 between Western Illinois and Luther College. There was no game played in 1952 and 1954.[2]

The game was primarily organized by A. B. Perry, who called for the construction of a stadium that would seat 150,000. The plans never came to fruition and the largest crowd attracted to a game was 8,000 spectators for the 1948 matchup.[1] The 1949 matchup was witnessed by 4,567 fans.[3]

The bowl was sponsored by the Hybrid Seed Corn Breeders of Illinois and the Bloomington American Legion.[4]

Results[edit]

Year Winner Score Loser Score Location
1947 Southern Illinois 21 North Central College 0 Fred Carlton Field – Normal, Illinois
1948 Illinois Wesleyan 6 Eastern Illinois 0 Wesleyan Field – Bloomington, Illinois
1949 Western Illinois 13 Wheaton 0 Wesleyan Field – Bloomington, Illinois
1950 Missouri-Rolla 7 Illinois State 6 Wesleyan Field – Bloomington, Illinois
1951 Lewis 21 William Jewell 12 Wesleyan Field – Bloomington, Illinois
1953 Western Illinois 32 Iowa Wesleyan 0 Wesleyan Field – Bloomington, Illinois
1955 Luther 24 Western Illinois 20 Wesleyan Field – Bloomington, Illinois

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Kemp, Bill (November 18, 2007). "Corn Bowl was short-lived Thanksgiving gridiron tradition". Pantagraph.com. Retrieved January 3, 2012. 
  2. ^ DeLassus, David. "Corn Bowl Games". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved January 3, 2012. 
  3. ^ "Wins Corn Bowl Game". Reading Eagle. November 25, 1949. Retrieved January 4, 2012. 
  4. ^ Jauss, Bill (October 16, 1997). "Full Crop Of Corn Bowl Memories". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved January 4, 2012.