Corpse Reviver

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The Corpse Reviver family of cocktails are intended as 'hair of the dog' hangover cures, hence the name. Most of the corpse reviver cocktails have been lost to time, but the cognac- and gin-based Corpse Reviver and Corpse Reviver #2 cocktails that were first listed in the Savoy Cocktail Handbook by Harry Craddock in 1930[1] have survived to this day.[2]

Corpse Reviver
Type Cocktail
Primary alcohol by volume
Served Straight up; without ice
Standard drinkware
Cocktail Glass (Martini).svg
Cocktail glass
Commonly used ingredients
Preparation Stir with ice, strain into a chilled cocktail glass.

The plain Corpse Reviver cocktail is a cognac-based cocktail, with two parts cognac, one part Calvados or equivalent apple brandy, and one part sweet vermouth.

Corpse Reviver #2[edit]

Corpse Reviver #2
Type Cocktail
Primary alcohol by volume
Served Straight up; without ice
Standard drinkware
Cocktail Glass (Martini).svg
Cocktail glass
Commonly used ingredients
Preparation Shake ingredients together in a mixer with ice. Strain into chilled glass.

The Corpse Reviver #2 is the more popular of the corpse revivers, and consists of equal parts gin, lemon juice, triple sec (commonly Cointreau), Kina Lillet, and a dash of absinthe. The dash of absinthe can either be added to the mix before shaking, or added to the cocktail glass and moved around until the glass has been coated with a layer of absinthe. It can also be used to coat the edge of the glass to give a subtle absinthe aroma and flavor to the drink.[3][4]


Savoy Corpse Reviver[edit]

Savoy Corpse Reviver
Type Cocktail
Primary alcohol by volume
Served Straight up; without ice
Standard drinkware
Cocktail Glass (Martini).svg
Cocktail glass
Commonly used ingredients
Preparation Shake ingredients together with ice, and strain into a glass.

This recipe is a variation invented by Joe Gilmore in 1954.

References[edit]