Corrales, New Mexico

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Corrales, New Mexico
Village
Mariquita Road in Corrales
Mariquita Road in Corrales
Location of Corrales, New Mexico
Location of Corrales, New Mexico
Coordinates: 35°14′5″N 106°37′5″W / 35.23472°N 106.61806°W / 35.23472; -106.61806Coordinates: 35°14′5″N 106°37′5″W / 35.23472°N 106.61806°W / 35.23472; -106.61806
Country United States
State New Mexico
Counties Sandoval
Government
 • mayor Scott Kominiak
Area
 • Total 11.3 sq mi (29 km2)
 • Land 10.7 sq mi (28 km2)
 • Water 0.5 sq mi (1.3 km2)
Elevation 5,023 ft (1,531 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 8,329
 • Density 778.4/sq mi (286.2/km2)
Time zone Mountain (MST) (UTC-7)
 • Summer (DST) MDT (UTC-6)
ZIP code 87048
Area code(s) 505
FIPS code 35-17960
GNIS feature ID 0905378
Website www.corrales-nm.org

Corrales is a village in Sandoval County, New Mexico, United States. The population was 8,329 at the 2010 Census. It is part of the Albuquerque Metropolitan Statistical Area. With proximity to the Rio Grande, the village was founded for agricultural purposes. The Rio Grande Bosque on the eastern edge of the village provides refuge for native animals and plants. The village fights hard to maintain its rural character in light of being surrounded by the rapidly growing cities of Rio Rancho and Albuquerque [1] The village was selected as #19 in CNN Money's list of the 100 best places to live in 2007. [2]

Corrales is the residence of former U.S. Senator Fred Harris of Oklahoma, who unsuccessfully sought the 1976 Democratic presidential nomination.[3] Timothy Kraft, a political consultant and campaign manager for Harris' rival, Jimmy Carter, formerly lived in Corrales.[4]


Geography[edit]

Corrales is located at 35°14′5″N 106°37′5″W / 35.23472°N 106.61806°W / 35.23472; -106.61806 (35.234838, -106.618183).[5]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 11.2 square miles (29 km2), of which, 10.7 square miles (28 km2) is land and 0.5 square miles (1.3 km2) (4.71%) is water.

Until 2005, portions of the Village of Corrales were located in both Bernalillo and Sandoval counties. In 2005, a special election annexed the portion of Corrales located in Bernalillo County to Sandoval County, so that now the entire village is located in Sandoval County.

Demographics[edit]

As of the census[6] of 2000, there were 7,334 people, 2,819 households, and 2,122 families residing in the village. The population density was 683.7 inhabitants per square mile (264.0/km2). There were 2,983 housing units at an average density of 278.1 per square mile (107.4/km2). The racial makeup of the village was 86.05% White, 0.57% African American, 1.51% Native American, 0.79% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 8.22% from other races, and 2.82% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 25.55% of the population.

There were 2,819 households out of which 32.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 65.4% were married couples living together, 7.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 24.7% were non-families. 18.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 4.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.60 and the average family size was 2.97.

In the village the population was spread out with 24.6% under the age of 18, 4.8% from 18 to 24, 25.9% from 25 to 44, 34.2% from 45 to 64, and 10.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females there were 93.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.2 males.

The median income for a household in the village was $67,217, and the median income for a family was $79,331. Males had a median income of $52,397 versus $34,091 for females. The per capita income for the village was $33,629. About 3.1% of families and 5.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 7.8% of those under age 18 and 1.8% of those age 65 or over.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Village of Corrales, New Mexico". Retrieved 2012-03-30. 
  2. ^ Ashford, Kate; Bartz, Andrea; Cox, Jeff; Fitch, Asa; Gandel, Stephen; Hyatt, Josh; Kelley, Rob; Knight, Kathleen et al. "CNN Money Magazine 100 Best Places to Live 2007, Corrales". 
  3. ^ Berg, Jeff (March 2008). "The Political Kraft". Desert Exposure. 
  4. ^ Kaufman, Burton Ira (2009). The Carter Years. Facts on File library of American History: Presidential Profiles. New York City: InfoBase Publishing. p. 271. ISBN 9780816074587. 
  5. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  6. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31.