Corruption in Switzerland

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Corruption in Switzerland is examined on this page.

Extent[edit]

Switzerland has a strong legal framework to combat corruption and several authorities are in charge of curbing the levels of it, particularly when it comes to corruption within Swiss financial institutions.[1] Several sources suggest that the country's fight against corruption has been effective.[2][3]

The Transparency International Global Barometer 2013 shows that 58% of the surveyed households believe that corruption has not changed over the past two years, and 28% believe that it has actually increased. The same survey also shows that political parties are considered the most corrupt institution in Switzerland.[4]

Regarding business and corruption, companies do not consider corruption a problem for doing business in Switzerland, and Swiss companies are active in Corporate Social Responsibility that are generally in line with OECD Guidelines for multinational enterprises.[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Snapshot of the Switzerland Country Profile". Business Anti-Corruption Portal. Retrieved 4 December 2013. 
  2. ^ "2013 Investment Climate Statement - Switzerland (Including Lichtenstein)". US Department of State. Retrieved 4 December 2013. 
  3. ^ "Human Rights Report 2012- Switzerland". US Department of State. Retrieved 4 December 2013. 
  4. ^ "Global Corruption Barometer 2013". Transparency International. Retrieved 4 December 2013. 
  5. ^ "Snapshot of the Switzerland Country Profile". Business Anti-Corruption Portal. Retrieved 4 December 2013. 

External links[edit]